Greenpeace: Coal & Nukes, But No Green Energy Print
Earth News
Wednesday, 15 June 2005 14:35
Greenpeace: Coal & Nukes, But No Green Energy
McGuinty government backtracks on coal phaseout

Toronto, Wednesday June 15, 2005: Nanticoke will remain North America?s single largest emitter of acid rain, smog and climate change gases. The McGuinty government backtracked on its promise to shut down the Nanticoke coal generating station by 2007. Greenpeace called on the government to stop paying lip service to conservation and renewable energy and to end its obsession with nuclear power. With 8 generating units of about 500 megawatts (MW) each, Nanticoke is North America?s single largest emitter of acid rain, smog and climate change gases.

greenpeace.ca

From: "Dave Martin" < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2005 15:21:41 -0400
Subject: Greenpeace: coal & nukes, but no green energy

GREENPEACE

"Today?s announcement is bad news for the environment. If the McGuinty government stopped paying lip service to conservation and renewable energy, it could phase out both coal and nuclear power" said Greenpeace Energy Campaigner, Shawn-Patrick Stensil. "Conservation, wind and solar have huge potential. The government?s modest targets should be at least doubled. If the McGuinty Liberals don?t begin to seriously invest in renewables and conservation and stop investing billions in rebuilding old nuclear stations, our dependence on polluting coal plants will only continue."

The government is proceeding with an aggressive nuclear program, continuing secret negotiations with Bruce Power to restart two nuclear reactors -- Bruce reactors 1 and 2 at the Bruce "A" nuclear station, totalling 1540 MW, on the shore of Lake Huron near Kincardine. The McGuinty government also approved a second 500 MW reactor at the old and dangerous Pickering "A" nuclear station just east of Toronto, expected to be restarted later this month. Government approval for rebuilding two more reactors at the Pickering "A" station is expected to follow soon after the restart of the second reactor. Last month Energy Minister Dwight Duncan also opened the door to the possibility of building new nuclear power plants, for the first time in more than a generation.

"Reliance on nuclear plants that didn?t work caused coal emissions to double in the last decade. The McGuinty government should learn the big lesson of Ontario?s electricity history ? invest in green energy instead of nuclear power and coal. Conservation and renewable energy are cleaner, safer, cheaper, and more reliable," said Stensil. "Premier McGuinty will be pleasantly surprised if he actually raises the bar and sets more ambitious targets on green power."

In 2000, Germany decided to phase out its nuclear plants by 2020. Germany closed its first reactor in 2003 and has installed over 15,000 megawatts of wind energy. In 1997, Ontario was forced to shut down 8 of its 20 nuclear reactors due to bad performance and safety problems. The cost of restarting these reactors is at least $7 billion, and four of them remain mothballed. All of the remaining reactors reach the end of their useful lives after about 25 years, meaning they must all be shut down between now and 2018, or rebuilt at massive cost.

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For more information:

Shawn-Patrick Stensil, Energy Campaigner, 416-597-8408 X 3013 (cell) 416-884- 7053

Dave Martin, Energy Coordinator, (cell) 416-627-5004

Andrew Male, Communications Coordinator, 416-597-8408 X 3030 (cell) 416-880- 2757

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David H. Martin, Energy Co-ordinator, Greenpeace Canada

250 Dundas St. W., Suite 605

Toronto, Ontario, Canada  M5T 2Z5

TEL 416-597-8408 X 3050  CELL 416-627-5004  FAX 416-597-8422

ICQ 269129334  E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

www.greenpeace.ca

Last Updated on Wednesday, 15 June 2005 14:35