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The ICCA Consortium stands with the Wet’suwet’en PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 30 January 2019 19:05
 
We submit this message to you as a demonstration of our support and solidarity as you uphold and defend your unceded, ancestral homeland. The Wet’suwet’en have the right to live in balance with their lands and waters and have a responsibility to defend their culture, language, and livelihood.
 
The ICCA Consortium is an international association under Swiss law uniting federations and organizations  of  indigenous  peoples,  local  communities  and civil  society  organisations concerned  with  the  appropriate  recognition  of  the territories  and  areas  conserved  by indigenous peoples and local communities (ICCAs) throughout the world.  We are a partner organization  of  the  Secretariat  of  the  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity  (CBD),  the  United Nations  Development  Programme  (UNDP  GEF  SGP)  and  the  International  Union  for  the Conservation  of  Nature  (IUCN).  Our direct Members  and  Honorary  members  span  over seventy-five countries.
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223 international scientists urge B.C. to protect provincial rainforests PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 27 January 2019 17:28
 
'There are certain places that are so biologically rare and important'
Matt Humphrey · CBC News · Posted: Jun 28, 2018 8:00 AM PT | Last Updated: June 28, 2018
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/rain-forest-gone-1.4724448
 
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B.C. is known for its towering trees and temperate rain forests, but an international group of scientists is warning that without urgent protection, those forests are at risk of disappearing.
 
A total of 223 scientists from nine countries have signed a letter urging the provincial government to take immediate action to protect B.C.'s remaining temperate rain forests.
 
"There are certain places that are so biologically rare and important," said Dominick DellaSala, the chief scientist at the Geos Institute in Oregon who helped organize the letter.
 
"The B.C. rainforests are among those rare places."
 
NDP blamed for failing to save Vancouver Island old-growth giants from logging
DellaSala said both the province's coastal rainforests and rainforests further inland are dissimilar to anywhere else on the planet. Both play important roles in the preservation of biodiversity and the battle against climate change, he said.
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No Access without Consent WEDZIN KWA CHECK POINT UNISTOTEN PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 15 January 2019 16:39
Rise and Resist's photo.
 
JAN16

No More Business as Usual: We Stand with Wet'suwet'en!

 
SITE C contravenes the precautionary principle, risking irreversible harm, misconstrues the equitable remedy of the injunction and discounts indigenous rights. PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 12 January 2019 23:03

 

Posted by Joan Russow
Monday, 30 July 2018 21:34

By JoanRussow  Global Compliance Research Project

Joan Russow founded the Global Compliance Research Project that  calls upon countries to comply with their international obligations and commitments. She has attended many international climate change, and environmental conferences.  Injunctions should be against those who cause irreversible harm not those who strive to prevent irreversible harm. Since Clayoquot Sound, she has been concerned about the misconstruing of injunctions and she is still saying, as she did then, “who are the real criminals?

 

 

Is it a crime to strive to prevent crime or is it a crime to cause and condone it?

 

A. NOT HEEDING AN INJUNCTION AS BEING AN EQUITABLE REMEDY THAT MOVES WITH TIME AND CIRCUMSTANCES AND TREATIES MUST BE COMPLIED WITH IS UNIVERSALLY RECOGNIZED (PACTA SUNT SERVANDA)

B. DISREGARDING “BEING HARMFUL” TO ECOSYSTEMS AS BEING A CRIME TO STATE AND SOCIETY –

C. OVERLOOKING THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE AND CONSERVATION  COMMITMENTS

D DISCOUNTINGA GLOBAL VISION FROM COP21 CONFERENCE  IN PARIS

E. DISRESPECTING RIGHTS OF FUTURE GENERATION

F. DISPENSING WITH UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (UNDRIP)

G. CONCLUSION 

Last Updated on Saturday, 12 January 2019 23:20
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Alex Neve and Sarah Morales: Site C dam still far from ‘point of no return’ PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 November 2018 11:49
Alex Neve and Sarah Morales: Site C dam still far from ‘point of no return’
ALEX NEVE & SARAH MORALES Updated: November 19, 2018
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Installation of concrete for the south-bank tailrace wall in July at B.C. Hydro's Site C dam construction project on the Peace River near Fort St. John. B.C. HYDRO / PNG

ADJUST
 
Installation of concrete for the south-bank tailrace wall in July at B.C. Hydro's Site C dam construction project on the Peace River near Fort St. John. B.C. HYDRO / PNG
 
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Last month, the B.C. Supreme Court handed the Horgan government a victory that may prove much more costly than a defeat.
 
The West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations had asked the court to temporarily suspend construction of the Site C dam, or at least protect critical areas of the Peace Valley while their still unresolved Treaty rights challenge is being considered. On Oct. 24, Justice Warren Milman dismissed the injunction application entirely. This is exactly what the provincial government and B.C. Hydro had asked the court to do.
 
At the same time, the judge ruled that the First Nations’ legal challenge can continue with the possibility that, if the First Nations are able to prove their case, the dam could be stopped before plans to flood the Peace River Valley are completed.
 
In other words, the court told the province, if you so choose, you’re free to continue sinking billions of dollars into a project you might never be allowed to complete.
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