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Consent Means Consent Not Consultation, Coercion or “after the Decision", Notification PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 13 June 2019 07:22

1.The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

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The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

 

The Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations exerpts from article by  Amnesty International

he Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations. ... 

Territory that the Lubicon have relied on to hunt, fish and trap is now crisscrossed by more than 2400 km of oil and gas pipelines.

That's more than five wells for every Lubicon person.“..

.the basic health and resistance to infection of community members has deteriorated dramatically.

The lack of running water and sanitary facilities in the community, needed to replace

the traditional systems of water and sanitary management...is leading to the development of diseases associated

with poverty and poor sanitary and healthconditions.” Lubicon complaint upheld by the United Nations Human Rights Committee in 1990

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 24 June 2019 11:37
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Elementary students restore, reclaim neighbourhood park PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:35

by oak bay news

nalt

 

 

Students from Janet Langston’s Grade 3 and 4 class at Margaret Jenkins elementary celebrate the school’s efforts to remove invasive species from Trafalgar Park (below King George Terrace). The park was covered in gorse and blackberry and wild flowers and roses are now thriving. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)

 
Elementary students restore, reclaim neighbourhood park
Margaret Jenkins students 2.5 years into restoration
 
 
 
 
The reclamation of Trafalgar Park continues but to anyone who has visited in the past three years, the removal of invasive species has revealed a landscape unseen for decades.
 
And the work has been done by a pair of Margarets.
 
Well known Uplands Park advocate and volunteer Margaret Lidkea helped lead a program for nearby Margaret Jenkins elementary school students. Lidkea provides the know-how and the students provide the muscle.
 
 
 
The park was covered with rows of entrenched blackberry and gorse.
 
The students prove their knowledge by munching on a piece of Miner’s lettuce growing next to the six-feet-tall wild roses in Trafalgar.
 
“We gave them clippers, saws, and shears, and they’ve done the work,” Lidkea said. “It’s amazing,”
 
READ MORE: Student work sessions clear Trafalgar Park
 
Vice-principal Janet Langston’s Grade 3-4 class is one of the classes that makes regular trips to Trafalgar to remove invasives.
 
Last year Langston took it to the next level as the school received a grant from the TD Friends of the Environment, to purchase over $2,000 worth of native plants. The native species were planted in the fall to help prevent invasvies from returning and restore the pre-colonial ecosystem.
 
“Students have also been removing English ivy especially along the lower trail and under the native crabapple trees,” Lidkea said. “The camas responded with many purple-blue blooms.”
 
 
 
(Inset photo: Margaret Jenkins students swarm Trafalgar Park in 2017 to remove the invasive gorse.)
 
They also planted grasses on the upper slopes to prevent erosion now that the heavily invasive Himalayan blackberry and gorse have been removed.
 
READ ALSO: Friends of Uplands Park leader honoured at Government House
 
Granted, the stubborn invasives still crop up, which is why Margaret Jenkins students will continue to be relied upon to remove gorse blossoms and other plants which crop up due to a remaining seed bank of invasives embedded on the Trafalgar slopes.
 
Last year Margaret Jenkins also earned one of the Staple’s top 10 Superpower Your School awards for their ecological efforts.
 
Staples gave the school $20,000 in new technology and the Trafalgar Park work was a major project that contributed to the win, Lidkea said.
 
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Invoke the Precautionary Principle, no Highway through the Sooke Hills Wilderness PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 24 February 2019 10:05

 

by Joan Russow

Global Compliance Research Project

 

alt

from Sooke Mirror

 

In 1992, when there was a NDP Government, I received the following from Freedom of information;

In a document obtained through the Freedom of information Act there was evidence of the Provincial cabinet endorsement for the ratification of the Biodiversity and Climate Change Conventions:

..."The Province endorsed the ratification. We agreed with Canada to ratify it. There was provincial endorsement. The move to endorse the Conventions was made by John Cashore, the then B.C. Minister of Environment" Cashore then went to Cabinet, sought their support and endorsement of the ratification and then stated that the Cabinet had approved the Conventions to the CCME meeting

 

Through the endorsement, the BCT NDP government agreed to the precautionary principle as expressed in the UN Framework convention on Climate change and the convention on Biological Diversity. (obtained through freedom of information ,1992)

Last Updated on Sunday, 24 February 2019 10:30
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Ottawa’s Wood Buffalo plan ‘not good enough’: First Nations PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 12 February 2019 20:47
 
Canada’s largest national park is at risk of losing its status as a World Heritage site due to the impacts of dams, oil development and climate change
 
Judith Lavoie Feb 7, 2019 
 
https://thenarwhal.ca/ottawas-wood-buffalo-plan-not-good-enough-first-nations/?fbclid=IwAR34CIc9xuURU8rqlXU5HE_nrIIj4oCkgBU-Q_RMTkA_QMKllV93_gBoo2
 
 
 
The federal government is promising to create artificial ice jams, strategically release water from BC Hydro dams and assess cumulative impacts on northern Alberta’s Peace-Athabasca delta in an attempt to retain the World Heritage status of Canada’s largest national park.
 
 
 
However, Ottawa’s long-awaited action plan for Wood Buffalo National Park rejects a World Heritage Committee recommendation calling on Canada to  conduct an environmental and social impact assessment of the controversial Site C dam. The action plan says the federal government’s hands are tied because an assessment of the project was completed by a federal-provincial review panel before the dam was approved in 2014.
Last Updated on Saturday, 16 February 2019 08:39
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Rachel LaFortune: "Rule of law" is not a justification for colonial violence in Wet'suwet'en pipeline dispute PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 08 February 2019 13:03
 
BY Rachel LaFortaine
https://www.straight.com/news/1196861/rachel-lafortune-rule-law-not-justification-colonial-violence
 
by Guest on February 4th, 2019 at 5:06 PM

By Rachel LaFortune

 
 
SUB.MEDIA SCREEN SHOT
By Rachel LaFortune
 
RELATED STORIES
Tensions rise over pipeline project following truce between Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs and RCMP
David Suzuki: Pipeline blockade is a sign of deeper troubles
RCMP arrest 14 anti-pipeline activists at Gitdumt'en checkpoint on Wet'suwet'en territory
Showdown expected in northwestern B.C. between RCMP and Indigenous protesters over pipeline project
When governments rely on court-granted injunctions to define the “rule of law” in respect to Indigenous land occupations, they risk breaching their Constitutional and international human-rights obligations and undermining any chance at meaningful reconciliation.
 
Case in point: the injunction currently being enforced against Wet’suwet’en land and water defenders in British Columbia.
Last Updated on Friday, 08 February 2019 13:28
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