Who's Online

We have 359 guests online

Popular

International Categories
Canada backs coup against Bolivia’s president PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 27 November 2019 10:50

Canada backs coup against Bolivia’s president

BY Yves Engler https://yvesengler.com/2019/11/11/canada-backs-coup-againgst-bolivias-president/

Unknown-2In yet another example of the Liberals saying one thing and doing another, Justin Trudeau’s government has supported the ouster of Evo Morales. The Liberals position on Bolivia’s first ever indigenous president stands in stark contrast with their backing of embattled pro-corporate presidents in the region.

Hours after the military command forced Morales to resign as president of the most indigenous nation in the Americas, Chrystia Freeland endorsed the coup. Canada’s foreign affairs minister released a statement noting “Canada stands with Bolivia and the democratic will of its people. We note the resignation of President Morales and will continue to support Bolivia during this transition and the new elections.” Freeland’s statement had no hint of criticism of Morales’ ouster, who still has two months left on his 2015 election mandate. Elsewhere, leaders from Argentina to Cuba, Venezuela to Mexico, condemned Morales’ forced resignation.

Ten days ago Global Affairs Canada echoed the Trump administration’s criticism of Morales’ first round election victory. “It is not possible to accept the outcome under these circumstances,” said a Global Affairs statement. “We join our international partners in calling for a second round of elections to restore credibility in the electoral process.”

Read more...
 
Bolivia’s Coup Enabled by the Trump Administration and the OAS PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 14 November 2019 15:19

"There's really nothing in [the OAS's] latest so-called preliminary audit that shows that there was any fraud in this election. But it was repeated over and over again," Weisbrot told Democracy Now. The coup came after "The Trump administration and the OAS...tried — without offering any evidence — to discredit Bolivia's national election in the past couple of weeks," Weisbrot wrote at The Nation.

<"2020 Presidential candidates have elevated [housing] as an issue" />

CEPR's Andrea M. Beaty and Shawn Fremstad prepared a report comparing rental housing and homelessness policies expressed or proposed by most of the presidential candidates of the two major parties. This report documents the candidates' positions on a broad range of rental housing policy, including affordabilty, housing assistance, tenant protections, discrimination, and homelessness. In addition, it outlines the current funding levels of selected federal housing and homelessness programs.

Inflation inequality is one more reason the US must update its poverty measure, writes Shawn Fremstad. Citing research by the Groundwork Collaborative, Fremstad notes that the US "is the only country in the world…using a poverty line set over half a century ago and since then only adjusted for inflation." 

Eileen Appelbaum will be a featured presenter at The Hidden Costs of Healthcare, a special two-hour event hosted by the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET). The event draws attention to important, but overlooked, factors contributing to rising healthcare costs, including groundbreaking research from Appelbaum and Rosemary Batt into the role private equity firms play in surprise medical billing.

The event is tomorrow, November 15, starting at 10 am, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This is a public event, but please register here.

CEPR is Looking for Winter Interns (January – May 2020)
If you're passionate about current economic and global justice issues, apply for a paid internship in our domestic program by Saturday, November 30 or in our international program by Sunday, December 8th.

The intellectual authors of this crime have yet to face justice.

The Revolving Door Project (RDP), a project of CEPR, now has a newsletter and its own official Twitter account. Every two weeks, the newsletter will give you an update on how the executive branch is promoting economic inequality, what Congress is or isn't doing in response, and whether 2020 presidential candidates would be any better. Subscribe to the RDP newsletter and follow @revolvingdoorDC on Twitter.

Newsletter:
Less Drowsy Congress Still Less Observant than Bank Lobbyists
November 6, 2019

RDP Highlights:

Dems Must Confront GOP Attacks On Independent Agencies
by Max Moran

Freshman Democrats Seek to Make Corporate Oversight Routine Again
by Eleanor Eagan

CEPR in the News

New York Magazine, quoting Eileen AppelbaumThe Senseless Death of Deadspin

BBC World News, interviewing Mark WeisbrotThe Bolivian Elections

New York Times, quoting Dean BakerBill Gates, I Implore You to Connect Some Dots

CNN, citing CEPRBolivia's Evo Morales on Plane to Mexico Amid Political Crisis

MarketPlace Radio, quoting Dean BakerWorker Productivity Declined for First Time in Four Years

Thom Hartmann Program, interviewing Guillaume LongRight Wing Oligarchs Behind Bolivian Coup Exposed!

CEPR Blog

Inflation Inequality and the Poverty Measure

by Shawn Fremstad


Beat the Press

CEPR

The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) is an independent, nonpartisan think tank that was established to promote democratic debate on the most important economic and social issues that affect people's lives.

CEPR was co-founded by economists Dean Baker and Mark Weisbrot in 1999.

Last Updated on Thursday, 14 November 2019 18:19
 
No Evidence That Bolivian Election Results Were Affected by Irregularities or Fraud, Statistical Analysis Shows PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 08 November 2019 16:14

 

 

Examination Finds Tally Sheets Consistent with Evo Morales’s First-Round Victory

 

For Immediate Release: November 8, 2019
Contact: Dan Beeton, 202-239-1460

WRITTEN BY CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND POLICY RESEARCH CEPR

 

Washington, DC — Statistical analysis of election returns and tally sheets from Bolivia’s October 20 elections shows no evidence that irregularities or fraud affected the official result that gave President Evo Morales a first-round victory, researchers and analysts at the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) say. Contrary to a postelection narrative that was supported, without evidence, by the OAS Electoral Observation Mission, statistical analysis shows that it was predictable that Morales would obtain a first-round win, based on the results of the first 83.85 percent of votes in a rapid count that showed Morales leading runner-up Carlos Mesa by less than 10 points.

Last Updated on Friday, 15 November 2019 23:21
Read more...
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 02 November 2019 11:37
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy', suggests researchers in new Japanese study in Science, which showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers after introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies, rapidly followed by the collapse of fish populations.
 
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy'
Common pesticides found to starve fish ‘astoundingly fast’ by killing aquatic insects
Damian Carrington, 31 Oct 2019 
 
Man spraying pesticides on rice paddyfield
 The research looked at the periods before and after the introduction of neonicotinoids on rice paddies in 1993. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
Man spraying pesticides on rice paddyfield
The research looked at the periods before and after the introduction of neonicotinoids on rice paddies in 1993. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
The Silent Spring prophecy that pesticides could “still the leaping of fish” has been confirmed, according to scientists investigating the collapse of fisheries in Japan. They say similar impacts are likely to have occurred around the world.
 
The long-term study showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers in a large lake after the introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies. This was rapidly followed by the collapse of smelt and eel populations, which had been stable for decades but rely on the tiny creatures for food.
 
The analysis shows a strong correlation but cannot prove a causal link between the insecticides and the collapse. However, independent scientists said other possibilities had been ruled out and that the work provided “compelling evidence”.
 
The research is the first to reveal the knock-on effects of insecticides on fish. Harm to bees is well known, but previous studies in Europe have linked neonicotinoids to die-offs in other freshwater species including mayflies, dragonflies and snails and also to falling populations of farmland bird that feed on insects, including starlings and swallows. The insecticide has also been shown to make migrating songbirds lose their way.
 
Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring, her seminal book on the dangers of pesticidesin 1962. In their report, the Japanese researchers said: “She wrote: ‘These sprays, dusts and aerosols are now applied almost universally to farms, gardens, forests and homes – nonselective chemicals that have the power to kill every insect, the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’, to still the song of birds and the leaping of fish in the streams.’ The ecological and economic impact of neonicotinoids on the inland waters of Japan confirms Carson’s prophecy.”
 
“This disruption likely also occurs elsewhere, as neonicotinoids are currently the most widely used class of insecticides globally,” worth more than $3bn year, they said.
 
Prof Olaf Jensen, at Rutgers University in the US and not part of the research team, said: “This study, although observational, presents compelling evidence. A fishery that was sustainable for decades collapsed within a year after farmers began using neonicotinoids. This is a large and astoundingly fast response.”
 
The research, published in the journal Science, looked at data from Lake Shinji spanning the decade before and the period after the introduction of neonicotinoids in 1993, from which point the pesticides started running off into the lake. They found neonicotinoid concentrations in the water frequently exceeded levels that are toxic to aquatic invertebrates.
 
The midge Chironomus plumosus, an important food source for smelt, was one of the worst affected. It vanished completely from all 39 locations sampled in 2016, despite being abundant in 1982. Another important food source, an abundant zooplankton species, Sinocalanus tenellus, fell by 83%.
 
The researchers found annual catches of smelt fell 90% in the decade after neonicotinoids were introduced, compared with the decade before. Catches of eels dropped by 74% over the same time period.
 
“Several alternative explanations for the collapse were evaluated and rejected: invasive species, hypoxia, or changes in fish stocking cannot plausibly explain the observations,” said Jensen. Furthermore, catches of icefish, which do not rely on the affected invertebrates for food, remained unchanged.
 
The research shows neonicotinoid pesticides can affect entire food webs, he said. On the lack of other reports of similar collapses, Jensen said: “There is the issue of not seeing a problem if we don’t look for it.”
 
Matt Shardlow, from the charity Buglife, said: “Japan has had a tragic experience with nerve-agent insecticides. In the paddy fields, where the air once thrummed with the clatter of billions of dragonfly wings, these insecticides have imposed near silence.”
 
“The annihilation of humble flies and the knock on effects on fish serve as further testament to the dreadful folly of neonicotinoids,” he said. “Let’s hope this is a wake-up call for Asian countries and they move to quickly ban the chemicals from paddyfields.”
 
“It is also extremely worrying that the levels of neonicotinoids in rivers in eastern England, as recently reported by Buglife, are very similar to the levels reported in this research,” Shardlow said. “Unfortunately, while it is clear that harm must have been done to UK river health, the exact impact of neonicotinoids has yet to be quantified.”
 
Last Updated on Saturday, 02 November 2019 11:43
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy' PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 02 November 2019 11:29
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy', suggests researchers in new Japanese study in Science, which showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers after introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies, rapidly followed by the collapse of fish populations.
 
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy'
Common pesticides found to starve fish ‘astoundingly fast’ by killing aquatic insects
Damian Carrington, 31 Oct 2019 
Man spraying pesticides on rice paddyfield
The research looked at the periods before and after the introduction of neonicotinoids on rice paddies in 1993. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
The Silent Spring prophecy that pesticides could “still the leaping of fish” has been confirmed, according to scientists investigating the collapse of fisheries in Japan. They say similar impacts are likely to have occurred around the world.
 
The long-term study showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers in a large lake after the introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies. This was rapidly followed by the collapse of smelt and eel populations, which had been stable for decades but rely on the tiny creatures for food.
 
The analysis shows a strong correlation but cannot prove a causal link between the insecticides and the collapse. However, independent scientists said other possibilities had been ruled out and that the work provided “compelling evidence”.
 
The research is the first to reveal the knock-on effects of insecticides on fish. Harm to bees is well known, but previous studies in Europe have linked neonicotinoids to die-offs in other freshwater species including mayflies, dragonflies and snails and also to falling populations of farmland bird that feed on insects, including starlings and swallows. The insecticide has also been shown to make migrating songbirds lose their way.
 
Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring, her seminal book on the dangers of pesticidesin 1962. In their report, the Japanese researchers said: “She wrote: ‘These sprays, dusts and aerosols are now applied almost universally to farms, gardens, forests and homes – nonselective chemicals that have the power to kill every insect, the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’, to still the song of birds and the leaping of fish in the streams.’ The ecological and economic impact of neonicotinoids on the inland waters of Japan confirms Carson’s prophecy.”
 
“This disruption likely also occurs elsewhere, as neonicotinoids are currently the most widely used class of insecticides globally,” worth more than $3bn year, they said.
 
Prof Olaf Jensen, at Rutgers University in the US and not part of the research team, said: “This study, although observational, presents compelling evidence. A fishery that was sustainable for decades collapsed within a year after farmers began using neonicotinoids. This is a large and astoundingly fast response.”
 
The research, published in the journal Science, looked at data from Lake Shinji spanning the decade before and the period after the introduction of neonicotinoids in 1993, from which point the pesticides started running off into the lake. They found neonicotinoid concentrations in the water frequently exceeded levels that are toxic to aquatic invertebrates.
 
The midge Chironomus plumosus, an important food source for smelt, was one of the worst affected. It vanished completely from all 39 locations sampled in 2016, despite being abundant in 1982. Another important food source, an abundant zooplankton species, Sinocalanus tenellus, fell by 83%.
 
The researchers found annual catches of smelt fell 90% in the decade after neonicotinoids were introduced, compared with the decade before. Catches of eels dropped by 74% over the same time period.
 
“Several alternative explanations for the collapse were evaluated and rejected: invasive species, hypoxia, or changes in fish stocking cannot plausibly explain the observations,” said Jensen. Furthermore, catches of icefish, which do not rely on the affected invertebrates for food, remained unchanged.
 
The research shows neonicotinoid pesticides can affect entire food webs, he said. On the lack of other reports of similar collapses, Jensen said: “There is the issue of not seeing a problem if we don’t look for it.”
 
Matt Shardlow, from the charity Buglife, said: “Japan has had a tragic experience with nerve-agent insecticides. In the paddy fields, where the air once thrummed with the clatter of billions of dragonfly wings, these insecticides have imposed near silence.”
 
“The annihilation of humble flies and the knock on effects on fish serve as further testament to the dreadful folly of neonicotinoids,” he said. “Let’s hope this is a wake-up call for Asian countries and they move to quickly ban the chemicals from paddyfields.”
 
“It is also extremely worrying that the levels of neonicotinoids in rivers in eastern England, as recently reported by Buglife, are very similar to the levels reported in this research,” Shardlow said. “Unfortunately, while it is clear that harm must have been done to UK river health, the exact impact of neonicotinoids has yet to be quantified.”
 
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 1364

Latest News