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Tomgram: Aviva Chomsky, How the Green New Deal Is Changing America PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 06 August 2019 06:48

omgram: Aviva Chomsky, How the Green New Deal Is Changing America

Posted by Aviva Chomsky at 7:23am, August 6, 2019.

Honestly, is the phrase “climate-change denier” appropriate for Jair Bolsonaro, the Trumpian president of Brazil, who has denied that climate change is anything to worry about. But far more important, in office, he has opened the planet’s “lungs,” the Amazon rainforest, to exploitation and devastation. He’s a man who is essentially giving lung cancer to his country’s former carbon sink. Under his reign, according to the New York Times, the Brazilian Amazon has already lost 1,330 square miles of forest cover. That, of course, is a planetary, not just a Brazilian, catastrophe and the man working so hard to make it so will, as a result, be partially responsible for the future warming of the planet. In other words, he’s not a climate denier but an aider and abettor of the phenomenon.

That, at least, is the phrase I’ve started using for these guys. Maybe “climate change criminals” would be more appropriate. Yes, Donald Trump has “denied” climate change, calling it a “Chinese hoax,” tweet-mocking global warming whenever it snows, and so on. Far more important, though, he and his cronies are working hard in just about every way imaginable to increase U.S. carbon emissions (which are, as of 2018, again on the rise). So TomDispatch regular Aviva Chomsky arrives just in the nick of time with a vivid description of how so many of the rest of us, particularly labor and environmental groups, are trying to get ourselves together on a planet where a number of our leaders are increasingly intent on taking us all down. Tom

Jobs, the Environment, and a Planet in Crisis 
Unions vs. Environmentalists or Unions and Environmentalists? 
By Aviva Chomsky

When it comes to heat, extreme weather, wildfires, and melting glaciers, the planet is now in what the media increasingly refers to as “record” territory, as climate change’s momentum outpaces predictions. In such a situation, in a country whose president and administration seem hell-bent on doing everything they conceivably can to make matters worse, the Green New Deal (GND) seems to offer at least a modest opening to a path forward.

You know, the resolution introduced this February in the House of Representatives by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Edward Markey (D-MA). Unsurprisingly, the proposal has been roundly attacked by the right. But it’s stirred up some controversy on the left as well. You might imagine that labor unions and environmental organizations would be wholeheartedly for a massive federal investment in good jobs and a just transition away from fossil fuels. But does organized labor actually support or oppose the Green New Deal? What about environmental organizations? If you’re not even sure how to answer such questions, you’re not alone.

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 August 2019 22:39
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B.C. landowners dig in their heels over Trans Mountain pipeline construction PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 11 September 2019 13:13
 
“It’s caused me emotional devastation. They are killing me through stress and legal fees.”
 
LAURA KANE, THE CANADIAN PRESS Updated: September 10, 2019
 
 
Barbara Gard calls her three-hectare property, nestled below the forested peak of Sumas Mountain, a “miniature Stanley Park.” Its lush trees and flowing creek reminded her of Vancouver’s majestic park, and she immediately knew she wanted to call it home.
 
But she said her peaceful retreat in Abbotsford now feels more like a nightmare. Gard is among thousands of landowners along the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion route who have not yet granted the Crown corporation access to their property, and she said her dealings with the project’s owners over the years have shattered her mental health.
 
“It’s caused me emotional devastation,” said Gard, a 64-year-old school psychologist on medical leave from work. “They are killing me through stress and legal fees.”
 
Numerous hurdles remain before significant construction can begin on the massive project. Trans Mountain Corp. has not signed agreements with 33 per cent of landowners, no part of the detailed route has been approved, about half of the necessary permits are outstanding and it must meet dozens of conditions with the Canada Energy Regulator, formerly the National Energy Board.
 
Further, it faces resistance in southwest B.C., where landowners are digging in their heels, Indigenous groups are filing legal challenges and protesters are planning to ramp up activity.
 
The federal Liberal government bought the pipeline for $4.5 billion last year. The parliamentary budget officer has said that if the expansion is not complete by the end of 2021, it would be fair to conclude the government overpaid for the asset.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 September 2019 13:28
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WITH INDUSTRY DATING BACK TO 1859, PENNSYLVANIA STRUGGLES WITH 200,000+ ORPHAN WELLS PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 27 May 2019 10:58
 
FULL STORY: E&E NEWS @EENEWSUPDATES
 
MAY 26, 2019PRIMARY AUTHOR MIKE LEE @MIKELEEFW0
Jeremy Buckingham/flickr
https://theenergymix.com/2019/05/26/with-industry-dating-back-to-1859-pennsylvania-struggles-with-200000-orphan-wells/
 
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Although pressure is building on the fossil industry to address fugitive emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells, deadbeat drillers and insufficient public funds for cleanup mean Pennsylvania landowners who once played host to oil and gas extraction remain captive to all that was left behind.
 
While orphan wells have emerged as a tough, legally contentious issue in Alberta and British Columbia, they’re a much more established problem in Pennsylvania, where the United States’ first well was drilled in 1859, E&E News reports. Today, the state is “home to between 200,000 and 750,000 so-called orphan wells that have been abandoned and that have no apparent owner.” Taken together, these wells “emit 40,000 to 70,000 tonnes of methane a year, between 5% and 8% of the state’s human-caused methane emissions.”
 
Like this story? Subscribe to The Energy Mix and never miss an edition of our free e-digest.
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Elementary students restore, reclaim neighbourhood park PDF Print E-mail
PEJ Events
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:50

Students from Janet Langston’s Grade 3 and 4 class at Margaret Jenkins elementary celebrate the school’s efforts to remove invasive species from Trafalgar Park (below King George Terrace). The park was covered in gorse and blackberry and wild flowers and roses are now thriving. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)

Margaret Jenkins students 2.5 years into restoration

 

The reclamation of Trafalgar Park continues but to anyone who has visited in the past three years, the removal of invasive species has revealed a landscape unseen for decades.

And the work has been done by a pair of Margarets.

Well known Uplands Park advocate and volunteer Margaret Lidkea helped lead a program for nearby Margaret Jenkins elementary school students. Lidkea provides the know-how and the students provide the muscle.

Last Updated on Sunday, 02 June 2019 14:50
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Consent Means Consent Not Consultation, Coercion or “after the Decision", Notification PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 13 June 2019 07:22

1.The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

Image result for The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

 

The Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations exerpts from article by  Amnesty International

he Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations. ... 

Territory that the Lubicon have relied on to hunt, fish and trap is now crisscrossed by more than 2400 km of oil and gas pipelines.

That's more than five wells for every Lubicon person.“..

.the basic health and resistance to infection of community members has deteriorated dramatically.

The lack of running water and sanitary facilities in the community, needed to replace

the traditional systems of water and sanitary management...is leading to the development of diseases associated

with poverty and poor sanitary and healthconditions.” Lubicon complaint upheld by the United Nations Human Rights Committee in 1990

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 24 June 2019 11:37
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