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Trans Mountain Pipline PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Sue Hiscocks   
Thursday, 16 January 2020 20:06
The health of our oceans are at risk. The Supreme Court is allowing the pipeline to go through because they say that it is more important to enable the provinces to do business than to protect the environment. By making such a ruling they are saying in a broader seance that business trumps the protection of the environment and have set a precedence.that will decide every environmental issue on the side of the polluters. This needs to be stopped.
Last Updated on Thursday, 16 January 2020 20:10
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 02 November 2019 11:37
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy', suggests researchers in new Japanese study in Science, which showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers after introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies, rapidly followed by the collapse of fish populations.
 
 
Fishery collapse ‘confirms Silent Spring pesticide prophecy'
Common pesticides found to starve fish ‘astoundingly fast’ by killing aquatic insects
Damian Carrington, 31 Oct 2019 
 
Man spraying pesticides on rice paddyfield
 The research looked at the periods before and after the introduction of neonicotinoids on rice paddies in 1993. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
Man spraying pesticides on rice paddyfield
The research looked at the periods before and after the introduction of neonicotinoids on rice paddies in 1993. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA
The Silent Spring prophecy that pesticides could “still the leaping of fish” has been confirmed, according to scientists investigating the collapse of fisheries in Japan. They say similar impacts are likely to have occurred around the world.
 
The long-term study showed an immediate plunge in insect and plankton numbers in a large lake after the introduction of neonicotinoid pesticides to rice paddies. This was rapidly followed by the collapse of smelt and eel populations, which had been stable for decades but rely on the tiny creatures for food.
 
The analysis shows a strong correlation but cannot prove a causal link between the insecticides and the collapse. However, independent scientists said other possibilities had been ruled out and that the work provided “compelling evidence”.
 
The research is the first to reveal the knock-on effects of insecticides on fish. Harm to bees is well known, but previous studies in Europe have linked neonicotinoids to die-offs in other freshwater species including mayflies, dragonflies and snails and also to falling populations of farmland bird that feed on insects, including starlings and swallows. The insecticide has also been shown to make migrating songbirds lose their way.
 
Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring, her seminal book on the dangers of pesticidesin 1962. In their report, the Japanese researchers said: “She wrote: ‘These sprays, dusts and aerosols are now applied almost universally to farms, gardens, forests and homes – nonselective chemicals that have the power to kill every insect, the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’, to still the song of birds and the leaping of fish in the streams.’ The ecological and economic impact of neonicotinoids on the inland waters of Japan confirms Carson’s prophecy.”
 
“This disruption likely also occurs elsewhere, as neonicotinoids are currently the most widely used class of insecticides globally,” worth more than $3bn year, they said.
 
Prof Olaf Jensen, at Rutgers University in the US and not part of the research team, said: “This study, although observational, presents compelling evidence. A fishery that was sustainable for decades collapsed within a year after farmers began using neonicotinoids. This is a large and astoundingly fast response.”
 
The research, published in the journal Science, looked at data from Lake Shinji spanning the decade before and the period after the introduction of neonicotinoids in 1993, from which point the pesticides started running off into the lake. They found neonicotinoid concentrations in the water frequently exceeded levels that are toxic to aquatic invertebrates.
 
The midge Chironomus plumosus, an important food source for smelt, was one of the worst affected. It vanished completely from all 39 locations sampled in 2016, despite being abundant in 1982. Another important food source, an abundant zooplankton species, Sinocalanus tenellus, fell by 83%.
 
The researchers found annual catches of smelt fell 90% in the decade after neonicotinoids were introduced, compared with the decade before. Catches of eels dropped by 74% over the same time period.
 
“Several alternative explanations for the collapse were evaluated and rejected: invasive species, hypoxia, or changes in fish stocking cannot plausibly explain the observations,” said Jensen. Furthermore, catches of icefish, which do not rely on the affected invertebrates for food, remained unchanged.
 
The research shows neonicotinoid pesticides can affect entire food webs, he said. On the lack of other reports of similar collapses, Jensen said: “There is the issue of not seeing a problem if we don’t look for it.”
 
Matt Shardlow, from the charity Buglife, said: “Japan has had a tragic experience with nerve-agent insecticides. In the paddy fields, where the air once thrummed with the clatter of billions of dragonfly wings, these insecticides have imposed near silence.”
 
“The annihilation of humble flies and the knock on effects on fish serve as further testament to the dreadful folly of neonicotinoids,” he said. “Let’s hope this is a wake-up call for Asian countries and they move to quickly ban the chemicals from paddyfields.”
 
“It is also extremely worrying that the levels of neonicotinoids in rivers in eastern England, as recently reported by Buglife, are very similar to the levels reported in this research,” Shardlow said. “Unfortunately, while it is clear that harm must have been done to UK river health, the exact impact of neonicotinoids has yet to be quantified.”
 
Last Updated on Saturday, 02 November 2019 11:43
 
Petition to UNGA to set up an international Tribunal to try President Donald J Trump for Crimes Against the Peace PDF Print E-mail
Peace News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 06 January 2020 13:18

By the Global  Compliance Research Project 

The UN General Assembly should invoke under Article 22 of the Charter of the United Nations to Establish an International Tribunal to try  Donald J. Trump for Crimes Against Peace  for authorizing the United States’ military assassination of Iran’s most powerful military commander General Qasem Soleimani.

Image result for un ga third committee

The Nuremberg trial established key principles to apply in the case of Crimes against Peace, and War crimes. Two key principles are the following: (Principle 3) The fact that a person who committed an act which constitutes a crime under international law acted as head of state or responsible government official does not relieve him from responsibility under international law. 

(Principle 1) Any person who commits an act which constitutes a crime under international law is responsible therefore and liable to punishment.

It is time to finally establish an international tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law 

AND to try Donald J. Trump. This tribunal will incorporate the principles from the Nuremberg  and would be based previous  International Tribunals.

The Nuremberg trial established key principles to apply in the case of Crimes against Peace, and War crimes. Two key principles are the following: (Principle 3) The fact that a person who committed an act which constitutes a crime under international law acted as head of state or responsible government official does not relieve him from responsibility under international law. 

(Principle 1) Any person who commits an act which constitutes a crime under international law is responsible therefore and liable to punishment.

It is time to finally establish an international tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law 

AND to try President Donald J Trump,


Having been established by the United Nations General Assembly, under Article 22 of the Charter of the United Nations, the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed by PRESIDENT Donald J. Trump in the Territory of IRAQ  (hereinafter referred to as "the International Tribunal") shall function in accordance with the provisions of the present Statute.

Last Updated on Monday, 06 January 2020 17:34
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Avocado boom wreaks havoc on Latin America’s environment PDF Print E-mail
PEJ Events
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 21 December 2019 14:23
 
Avocado consumption surges in China but more cultivation means deforestation and drought in Latin America
 
 
avocado deforestation

image: Kevin Brown

 
Alejandra Cuéllar November 13, 2018
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avocado deforestation
image: Kevin Brown
 
“In Chile you have breakfast, lunch and you dream about avocado, but living in China it wasn’t easy to find,” says Camila Kemeny, a Chilean English teacher who lives in the eastern city of Hefei. “Lately I’ve been seeing more avocados, so I’m happy, because I’m always looking for them like crazy,” she added.
 
In recent years, imports of the “butter fruit”, as it is known in China, have exploded. Almost all come from Latin America. In 2017, China imported more than 32 thousand tonnes of avocado, 22% more than the previous year.
Last Updated on Saturday, 21 December 2019 14:29
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B.C. Civil Liberties Association to release CSIS papers on environmental groups Social Sharing PDF Print E-mail
Letters to Editor
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 08 July 2019 03:16

BCCLA complained to the Security Intelligence Review Committee in 2014

The Canadian Press · Posted: Jul 07, 2019 5:57 PM PT | Last Updated: 10 hours ago

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/b-c-civil-liberties-association-to-release-csis-papers-on-environmental-groups-1.5203323

The Canadian Press · 

Demonstrators block a road during a protest in the streets following the federal government's approval of the Enbridge's Northern Gateway pipeline in Vancouver, B.C., on June 17, 2014. (Reuters)

The British Columbia Civil Liberties Association is set to release what it calls a "trove" of heavily redacted documents disclosed by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service on Monday morning.

They concern the BCCLA's allegation that CSIS was monitoring the organizing activities and peaceful protests of Indigenous groups and environmentalists who were opposed to the now-defunct Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline project.

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 August 2019 22:50
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