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Mining firm takes on B.C. environmental group in defamation court battle PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 January 2015 15:33
Taseko Mines Limited offices in Vancouver, B.C.

The offices of Taseko Mines Limited is pictured in Vancouver on Thursday, Nov. 25, 2010. (Darryl Dyck / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

 
y Tamsyn Burgmann, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, January 19, 2015 7:13PM EST
Last Updated Monday, January 19, 2015 7:27PM EST

 

VANCOUVER -- Criticism of a proposed mine by an environmental group and allegations of defamation by the project's owner have landed both parties in British Columbia Supreme Court.

Taseko Mines Ltd. (TSX:TKO) launched the lawsuit after the Wilderness Committee made claims during a 2012 public comment period that the New Prosperity mine could destroy Fish Lake.

The proposed gold and copper mine, 125 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, was undergoing a federal environmental assessment when the statements were made.

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Canada opts not to block international trade in 76 endangered species PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 10 December 2014 20:10

Canada expressed reservations at 2013 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

The Canadian Press Posted: Dec 10, 2014 1:30 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 10, 2014 1:30 PM ET

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray.

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray. (David Loh/Reuters)

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray. (David Loh/Reuters)

Recently released documents indicate the federal government has reservations about restricting international trade in endangered species — more of them than almost any other government on Earth.

Last Updated on Thursday, 11 December 2014 21:07
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Pipeline threatens beluga whales, activists say PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 06 December 2014 09:19

Environmental groups seek injunction to stop planned drilling near Cacouna, Que.

CBC News Posted: Aug 29, 2014 9:17 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 29, 2014 9:17 PM ET

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/pipeline-threatens-beluga-whales-activists-say-1.2751200

 
The latest figures on beluga calves come amid a debate over whether to allow exploratory drilling off shore of Cacouna, Que., near the breeding ground at the mouth of the St. Lawrence.
 

our environmental groups are fighting to get a temporary injunction to stop exploratory drilling in the Saint Lawrence River.

They say the TransCanada pipeline project threatens a nursing ground for beluga whales.

Drilling is expected to begin near Cacouna, Que., just northeast of Rivière-du-Loup, on Sept. 2, but lawyers argued in court Friday for an injunction.

Karine Peloffy, an administrator of the Centre québécois du droit de l'environnement, said the main issue is protecting a beluga nursery in the region.

“Specifically this area around Cacouna because it’s shallower so the females feel more safe feeding their with their newborns than they would where it’s deeper,” Peloffy said.

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Widespread Use and Frequent Detection of Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Wetlands of Canada's Prairie Pothole Region PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 04 October 2014 10:41
  • By Anson R. Main,John V. Headley, Kerry M. Peru, Allan J. Cessna, Christy A. Morrissey mail
  • Published: March 26, 2014
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092821 ArticleAbout the AuthorsMetrics
Corrections

24 Jun 2014: The PLOS ONE Staff (2014) Correction: Widespread Use and Frequent Detection of Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Wetlands of Canada's Prairie Pothole Region. PLoS ONE 9(6): e101400. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0101400 | View correction

Abstract
Neonicotinoids currently dominate the insecticide market as seed treatments on Canada's major Prairie crops (e.g., canola). The potential impact to ecologically significant wetlands in this dominantly agro-environment has largely been overlooked while the distribution of use, incidence and level of contamination remains unreported. We modelled the spatial distribution of neonicotinoid use across the three Prairie Provinces in combination with temporal assessments of water and sediment concentrations in wetlands to measure four active ingredients (clothianidin, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid and acetamiprid). From 2009 to 2012, neonicotinoid use was increasing; by 2012, applications covered an estimated ~11 million hectares (44% of Prairie cropland) with >216,000 kg of active ingredients. Thiamethoxam, followed by clothianidin, were the dominant seed treatments by mass and area. Areas of high neonicotinoid use were identified as high density canola or soybean production. Water sampled four times from 136 wetlands (spring, summer, fall 2012 and spring 2013) across four rural municipalities in Saskatchewan similarly revealed clothianidin and thiamethoxam in the majority of samples. In spring 2012 prior to seeding, 36% of wetlands contained at least one neonicotinoid. Detections increased to 62% in summer 2012, declined to 16% in fall, and increased to 91% the following spring 2013 after ice-off. Peak concentrations were recorded during summer 2012 for both thiamethoxam (range:
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 19:53
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Lakes across Canada face being turned into mine dump sites PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 11 August 2014 10:58

Lakes across Canada face being turned into mine dump site

Posted:Jun 16, 2008
By Terry Milewski CBC News

http://www.cbc.ca/m/touch/ canada/story/1.733972

CBC News has learned that 16 Canadian lakes are slated to be officially but quietly "reclassified" as toxic dump sites for mines. The lakes include prime wilderness fishing lakes from B.C. to Newfoundland.

Environmentalists say the process amounts to a "hidden subsidy" to mining companies, allowing them to get around laws against the destruction of fish habitat.

Under the Fisheries Act, it's illegal to put harmful substances into fish-bearing waters. But, under a little-known subsection known as Schedule Two of the mining effluent regulations, federal bureaucrats can redefine lakes as "tailings impoundment areas."

Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 August 2014 22:27
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Nunavut artist refuses to perform for MP Leona Aglukkaq PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 09 August 2014 15:17

CBC News Posted: Aug 08, 2014 5:57 AM CT Last Updated: Aug 08, 2014 6:23 AM CT

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nunavut-artist-refuses-to-perform-for-mp-leona-aglukkaq-1.2730755

 Lucy Tulugarjuk says Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq is not speaking up for the people of Nunavut.

Lucy Tulugarjuk says Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq is not speaking up for the people of Nunavut. (CBC)

An artist has refused to perform for Nunavut's Member of Parliament, Leona Aglukkaq.

Nunavut's Lucy Tulugarjuk was asked to throat sing and drum dance during Aglukkaq's upcoming visit to Fort Smith, N.W.T., where the artist is currently living.

But she said she's not pleased with Aglukkaq. She said the MP has not addressed the concerns from Nunavummiut over seismic testing.

Some Inuit in Nunavut are furious over the National Energy Board's decision to approve an application to do seismic testing for oil and gas in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait off the east coast of Baffin Island.

They're worried wildlife will leave the area.

Leona Aglukkaq

Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq is under pressure from constituents over environmental issues. (CBC)

Tulugarjuk said Aglukkaq should be standing up for her people, rather than taking orders from Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

"I thought it was important to share with Inuit fellows, my friends and family that I am against it also and I will speak against it, if I must, and in that protest I refuse to throat sing and drum dance," Tulugarjuk said.

Tulugarjuk said a chief in Fort Smith asked her to perform, not Aglukkaq's staff.

 
NAFTA Environmental Watchdog Wants To Probe Oilsands Tailings Leakage PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 07 August 2014 16:54

 

 
OILSANDS
Investigators from an environmental watchdog set up as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement want to investigate whether Canada is enforcing its laws adequately when it comes to the oilsands. (CP) | Getty Images

Investigators from an environmental watchdog set up as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement want to investigate whether Canada is enforcing its laws on toxic leakage from giant oilsands tailings ponds.

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 17:03
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More than half of Ontario honey bees did not survive the winter Add to ... Eric Atkins PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 23 July 2014 19:43

Honey bees cluster on a bee keeping suit in Ravenna on October 18, 2013. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail) (DEBORAH BAIC/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
Honey bees cluster on a bee keeping suit in Ravenna on October 18, 2013. (Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail) (DEBORAH BAIC/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

BY Eric Atkins

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/more-than-half-of-ontario-honey-bees-did-not-survive-the-winter/article19721276/The Globe and Mail

54 commentsA new report on the health of honey bees in Canada says 58 per cent of the colonies in Ontario did not survive the winter, a figure that exceeds the 15-per-cent mortality rate seen as acceptable.
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Newfoundland bees drawing international scientific attention PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 13:53

By The Canadian Press Posted: Jul 21, 2014 1:14 PM NT Last Updated: Jul 21, 2014 1:19 PM NT

Newfoundland's healthy honeybees are an increasing draw for researchers in the race to understand why colonies across much of the globe are struggling or dying off.

Newfoundland's healthy honeybees are an increasing draw for researchers in the race to understand why colonies across much of the globe are struggling or dying off. (The Canadian Press)

Newfoundland's healthy honeybees are an increasing draw for researchers in the race to understand why colonies across much of the globe are struggling or dying off.

"There is definitely interest in what's happening here," said Dave Jennings, a director with the provincial Natural Resources department.

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Consider banning insecticides to save honeybees: Merulla PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 16 July 2014 10:49
 
By Samantha Craggs, CBC News Posted: Jun 16, 2014 5:15 PM ET| Last Updated: Jun 17, 2014 10:49 AM ET 
 
Beekeepers such as Les Simonffy of Ancaster have seen large portions of their hives die in the last few years. One Hamilton councillor wants to see what the city can do about it. (Matt Moir/CBC)

Beekeepers such as Les Simonffy of Ancaster have seen large portions of their hives die in the last few years. One Hamilton councillor wants to see what the city can do about it. (Matt Moir/CBC) 

 
 
Research has found neonicotinoids, a widely used insecticide, are contributing to honeybee deaths
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