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“Banning neonicotinoid pesticides will have almost no impact on corn and soy production PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 22 May 2015 20:32

MEDIA RELEASE / May 22, 2015

 
OTTAWA – A leaked report from Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) will make banning bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides a lot easier.

An economic analysis of the use of neonicotinoids on soy and corn crops shows a very tiny benefit to a very few farmers. Corn growers in some parts of Ontario may be seeing an economic benefit of only 3.6% while soy planters see almost no benefit (0.4%). These numbers are orders of magnitude lower than the doomsday predictions of the agro-chemical industry.

Banning neonicotinoid pesticides will have almost no impact on corn and soy production, and the vast majority of farmers will actually make more money not using them,” said John Bennett, National Program Director, Sierra Club Canada Foundation.

Neonicotinoid pesticides are used indiscriminately on almost all corn and soy crops in Canada. They are applied to the seeds before planting and the poison is absorbed by all parts of the plant, including pollen and nectar. The PMRA study looked at the added cost to the farmer of using the bee-killing pesticides and compared yields and losses to calculate the cost/benefit of their use.

The chemical industry may have convinced farm organizations that they need neonicotinoids to succeed, but this study strongly suggests the true value of these pesticides has been way over stated.

“Removing neonicotinoid pesticides from the marketplace will not have a significant impact on farmers or the their incomes,” said Mr. Bennett. “It’s time to do the right thing and ban these bee-killing pesticides.”

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John Bennett, National Program Director
Sierra Club Canada Foundation
1510-1 Nicholas Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 7B7
613-291-6888
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
John on Twitter / Bennett Blog

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 23 May 2015 06:58
 
Expert quits 'rigged' Trans Mountain oil pipeline review PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 20 May 2015 14:17
Economist Robyn Allan has quit as intervenor in the Trans Mountain pipeline hearings, saying the process is biased. - File photo
Economist Robyn Allan has quit as intervenor in the Trans Mountain pipeline hearings, saying the process is biased.
— Image Credit: File Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A prominent expert has withdrawn as an intervenor from the National Energy Board review of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion project to protest what she calls a broken system.

Robyn Allan, an economist and former ICBC president, quit in a strongly worded eight-pageletter to the NEB outlining her concerns with the review and the board itself.

"The game is rigged," she wrote. "We are being conned by the very agency entrusted to protect us."

Among Allan's criticisms is that the NEB is examining the project based only on Kinder Morgan's appli

Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 May 2015 14:23
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QUEBEC CITY RALLY TARGETS TAR SANDS PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 23 April 2015 10:32
 

 Canadians have a choice when it comes to fighting global warming, but true change can't be achieved by tar sands expansion

BY 

 

https://nowtoronto.com/news/quebec-city-rally-targets-tar-sands/

 

 

APRIL 14, 2015

Last Updated on Thursday, 23 April 2015 10:40
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Pacific herring stocks are shadows of their former abundance. But the Canadian government wants to reopen fishing off British Columbia. PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 12 February 2015 14:30

Fighting Over Herring­the Little Fish That Feeds Multitudes

By Craig Welch

National Geographic
http://news.
nationalgeographic.com/news/2015/02/150211-herring-decline-british-columbia-fishery-seabirds-environment/ 

Pacific herring in British Columbia, Canada, come near shore in massive schools every spring to spawn.

The Pacific herring­an oily, silvery, schooling fish­is rarely high on the list of marine animals people fret about.

But for the second straight year, the Canadian government has ignited a skirmish in British Columbia by moving to let fishing nets scoop up spawning herring, despite objections from scientists, Native people, and even commercial fishing groups.

"Last year it almost got to a war­locals were geared up to block fishing boats in port," said Tony Pitcher, a fisheries scientist with the University of British Columbia. "There were more police on the dock than there were local people."

This unusual battle is part of a global debate about the future of some of the oceans' most important fish: the abundant schools of sardines, squid, smelt, anchovies, and herring that serve as forage for larger animals in the sea.

Scientists like Pitcher argue that too few governments take into account the essential role these forage fish play in marine systems before deciding how many of them can be caught.

Last Updated on Thursday, 12 February 2015 16:58
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NAFTA environment watchdog won't probe oilsands tailings ponds PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 19:02

By Bob Weber, The Canadian Press 

 Wednesday, January 28, 2015 2:30PM EST

Alberta oilsands
A hydraulic shovel loads a heavy hauler at an oilsands mine north of Fort McMurray, Alta. on June 19, 2003. (Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS)
The three countries that run the North American Free Trade Agreement's environmental watchdog have voted against an investigation into how Canada oversees Alberta's oilsands.

The unanimous decision by Canada, Mexico and the United States comes despite recommendations from staff at the Commission on Environmental Co-operation. They had concluded there were enough questions about how environmental rules are enforced on oilsands tailings ponds to justify an investigation.

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Killing wolves without purpose PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 22 January 2015 11:58

BY John Bennett,  the Sierra Club of Canada

 

 

 
I have to report an ongoing travesty.

 

In the name of protecting Woodland Caribou, the Alberta Government has killed more than 1000 wolves using poison, traps, and guns from helicopters. Hundreds of other animals have also been killed, including moose and elk to bait wolf traps. Others have died by eating poison intended for the wolves. It’s barbaric and senseless.

This is all happening in the name of protecting Woodland Caribou. They call it a “cull”. The problem is it doesn’t work.

The reality is Woodland Caribou are declining as a result of habitat loss and disruption. In order to survive, Woodland Caribou need large areas of undisturbed, old growth woodland habitat for food, shelter and protection.

Woodland caribou have already lost at least one-half of their historic range in Canada. We’re in danger of losing the caribou if we don’t get a handle on industrial development and enact strong laws to restrict activities in caribou habitat.

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Five reasons to oppose BC’s wolf cull PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 22 January 2015 11:58
 
by Raincoast 
http://www.raincoast.org/2015/01/bc-wolf-hunt/2015 · 01 · 21
 
3 running wolves-PCP wm
3 running wolves-PCP wm
 
For your MLA contact info click here:  www.leg.bc.ca/mla
One.  Killing wolves will not improve caribou recovery. Ostensibly to protect caribou, the BC government has been engaging in wolf sterilization experiments and wolf killing for more than a decade. These programs have not resulted in any measurable benefits for caribou (as stated in the BC Wolf Management Plan).  Alberta’s wolf cull, as reported in the Canadian Journal of Zoology in Nov 2014, failed to achieve any improvement in Boreal Woodland Caribou adult female survival, or any improvement in calf survival, and as such had no effect on population dynamics.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 28 January 2015 06:58
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Mining firm takes on B.C. environmental group in defamation court battle PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 January 2015 15:33
Taseko Mines Limited offices in Vancouver, B.C.

The offices of Taseko Mines Limited is pictured in Vancouver on Thursday, Nov. 25, 2010. (Darryl Dyck / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

 
y Tamsyn Burgmann, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, January 19, 2015 7:13PM EST
Last Updated Monday, January 19, 2015 7:27PM EST

 

VANCOUVER -- Criticism of a proposed mine by an environmental group and allegations of defamation by the project's owner have landed both parties in British Columbia Supreme Court.

Taseko Mines Ltd. (TSX:TKO) launched the lawsuit after the Wilderness Committee made claims during a 2012 public comment period that the New Prosperity mine could destroy Fish Lake.

The proposed gold and copper mine, 125 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, was undergoing a federal environmental assessment when the statements were made.

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Canada opts not to block international trade in 76 endangered species PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 10 December 2014 20:10

Canada expressed reservations at 2013 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

The Canadian Press Posted: Dec 10, 2014 1:30 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 10, 2014 1:30 PM ET

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray.

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray. (David Loh/Reuters)

Canada has declined to restrict international trade for 76 endangered plant and animal species, including the manta ray. (David Loh/Reuters)

Recently released documents indicate the federal government has reservations about restricting international trade in endangered species — more of them than almost any other government on Earth.

Last Updated on Thursday, 11 December 2014 21:07
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Pipeline threatens beluga whales, activists say PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 06 December 2014 09:19

Environmental groups seek injunction to stop planned drilling near Cacouna, Que.

CBC News Posted: Aug 29, 2014 9:17 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 29, 2014 9:17 PM ET

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/pipeline-threatens-beluga-whales-activists-say-1.2751200

 
The latest figures on beluga calves come amid a debate over whether to allow exploratory drilling off shore of Cacouna, Que., near the breeding ground at the mouth of the St. Lawrence.
 

our environmental groups are fighting to get a temporary injunction to stop exploratory drilling in the Saint Lawrence River.

They say the TransCanada pipeline project threatens a nursing ground for beluga whales.

Drilling is expected to begin near Cacouna, Que., just northeast of Rivière-du-Loup, on Sept. 2, but lawyers argued in court Friday for an injunction.

Karine Peloffy, an administrator of the Centre québécois du droit de l'environnement, said the main issue is protecting a beluga nursery in the region.

“Specifically this area around Cacouna because it’s shallower so the females feel more safe feeding their with their newborns than they would where it’s deeper,” Peloffy said.

Read more...
 
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