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The Facts about Kinder Morgan PDF Print E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 08:56
 
 
 
Energy giant Kinder Morgan is planning to export millions of tons of coal to Asia from an
Oregon port on the Columbia River. Many community members are deeply concerned about the
pollution, noise, and economic risk entailed by the plans. Yet the company seems unconcerned.
“It’s just a location.”1 That’s what a Kinder Morgan spokesperson told the Portland Business
Journal.
 
In public, Kinder Morgan likes to point out that the firm already operates coal export
facilities in Virginia, South Carolina, and Louisiana. Or as the company’s spokesperson said in
the same interview, “What we’re proposing is not something we don’t already do.”
And that’s exactly the problem.
 
The truth is that Kinder Morgan’s existing coal export operations are well known for
blighting neighborhoods and fouling rivers. In fact, the company’s track record in the Northwest
and beyond is one of pollution, law-breaking, and cover-ups.
- In Louisiana, Kinder Morgan’s coal export facilities are so dirty that satellite photos
clearly show coal dust pollution spewing into the Mississippi River.
yy In South Carolina, coal dust from Kinder Morgan’s terminal contaminates oysters, pilings,
and boats. Locals have even caught the company on video washing coal directly into
sensitive waterways.
-
-In Virginia, Kinder Morgan’s coal export terminal is an open sore on the neighborhood,
coating nearby homes in dust so frequently that even the mayor is speaking out about the
problem.
 
-In Portland, Kinder Morgan officials bribed a ship captain to illegally dump contaminated
material at sea, and their operations have repeatedly polluted the Willamette River.
 
-Kinder Morgan has been fined by the US government for stealing coal from customer’s
stockpiles, lying to air pollution regulators, illegally mixing hazardous waste into gasoline,
and many other crimes.
 
Kinder Morgan’s pipelines are plagued by leaks and explosions, including two large
dangerous spills in residential neighborhoods in British Columbia.
In “The Facts about Kinder Morgan,” Sightline Institute explores the company’s misbehavior so
that Northwest residents can decide for themselves whether Kinder Morgan’s coal export plans
have a place in the region.
April 2012
Eric de Place
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 2
What is Kinder Morgan?
Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Kinder Morgan is an energy transport company that
describes itself as operating “like a giant toll road” for energy products. Kinder Morgan
was formed in 1997 when a pair of former high-level Enron executives, Richard Kinder and
William Morgan, bought pipelines and other assets from Enron.
The firm’s core business is moving fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas from
mines and wellheads to utilities, refineries, and manufacturers. Through partnerships and
acquisitions, Kinder Morgan has grown into one of the largest pipeline and bulk port
operators in the country. It consists of three major arms: Kinder Morgan, Inc., the parent
company; Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, L.P., the owner and operator of almost all the
assets; and Kinder Morgan Management. Combined, these firms are worth about $65
billion. Kinder Morgan also encompasses a labyrinthine array of subsidiary and partner
companies.2
Kinder Morgan aims to dramatically expand its pipeline operations. The company’s
biggest recent play is a $21.1 billion acquisition of the El Paso Corporation that the New
York Times reports will make Kinder Morgan the nation’s biggest empire of oil and gas
pipelines.3 Although the firm must undergo months of antitrust scrutiny, if the deal goes
through, it will leave Kinder Morgan with 80,000 miles of pipelines in 35 states.4
In the Northwest, Kinder Morgan is planning to double the capacity of its Trans
Mountain pipeline that connects the Alberta oil sands to Vancouver, British Columbia,
as well as to Washington refineries at Cherry Point and Anacortes.5 The company also
maintains the Pacific Pipeline that connects Portland to Eugene, as well as portions of four
port terminals: the Vancouver Wharves in British Columbia; Portland Bulk Terminal #4 in
Oregon; and the Longview and Vancouver Terminals in Washington.6
Primarily known for its extensive network of oil and gas pipelines, Kinder Morgan
is now expanding its coal transport and handling business.7 In 2010, the firm handled
approximately 31.6 million metric tons (mmt) of coal in the United States.8
Yet because demand for coal is declining in the United States, Kinder Morgan is looking
to expand coal exports. In fact, the company nearly doubled the amount of coal it exported
in 2011, and company analysts project an additional 6 mmt increase of coal exports in 2012.
At present, Kinder Morgan’s main coal export growth opportunities appear to be at their
Gulf Coast, Mississippi River, and East Coast terminals, but these are less than ideal for
serving Asian markets.9 To better meet demand for coal in Asia, Kinder Morgan is pursuing
plans for a West Coast coal export terminal.
Kinder Morgan to bring coal to the Northwest
Kinder Morgan is proposing to build and operate a coal export terminal in Oregon at the
Port Westward Industrial Park. The site is located on the Columbia River about 60 miles
northwest of Portland near the small town of Clatskanie. Once billed as a “hotbed for
renewable energy development,” Port Westward is owned by the Port of St. Helens, a public
entity.10
On January 25, 2012, port commissioners approved Kinder Morgan’s proposal.
According to the Oregonian, Kinder Morgan’s terminal could ultimately handle 30 mmt of
coal per year, with 15 mmt in an initial phase of development. The terminal would receive
coal originating in the Powder River Basin in southeast Montana and northeast Wyoming
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 3
that would travel in trains running through the Columbia Gorge. Port operators would
unload the coal into stockpiles and then subsequently load it onto ocean-going vessels bound
for Asia. Kinder Morgan estimates that the project would cost $150 million to $200 million
and would employ as many as 80 fulltime workers.11
A separate coal export proposal at Port Westward, by Australian coal company Ambre
Energy, would ship an additional 3.5 mmt of coal with an expansion potential of up to 8
mmt.12
Kinder Morgan claims that its coal handling operations at Port Westward will, “minimize
or eliminate environmental impact to air, land and water” and “will be conducted under a
strict Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) program.”13
Yet even a cursory examination of Kinder Morgan’s operations raises serious questions
about the company’s commitment to health, safety, and environmental protection. The
company’s petroleum coke operations in Houston, Texas, for example, are so dirty that even
the firm’s promotional literature shows plumes of black dust blowing off its railcar loading
equipment.14 It’s the same story for coal. Many of Kinder Morgan’s coal-handling sites are
rife with pollution, lax oversight, and deception.
River pollution in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana
Kinder Morgan’s International Marine Terminal (IMT), about 45 miles southeast of New
Orleans on the Mississippi River, is a key part of Kinder Morgan’s coal export strategy.15
In 2010, Kinder Morgan shipped about 10 mmt through IMT, and the firm has signed an
agreement to export up to an additional 6 mmt of coal per year.16
Publicly-available satellite imagery of Kinder Morgan’s port site shows plumes of what
appears to be coal dust, or possibly petroleum coke, contaminating the Mississippi River at
several points in and around the ship-loading facilities.17
Coal dust pollutes the Mississippi River at Kinder Morgan’s coal export terminal in Myrtle Grove,
Louisiana.
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 4
Coal dust problems for Charleston
Kinder Morgan’s Shipyard River Terminal covers 60 acres in Charleston, South Carolina.18
Although the terminal handles only about 3 million tons of coal per year, the site plagues
surrounding communities with numerous well-documented incidents of escaping coal dust.19
A typical account from Charleston’s Post and Courier newspaper reads:
As nearby residents and city officials hack about gritty air and clogged roads,
Kinder Morgan says it is just filling a need... Residents say that coal dust
from the facility already is polluting the air in nearby neighborhoods and at
the Cooper River Marina.20
Residents are particularly concerned about pollution on the Cooper River, which flows into
the Atlantic Ocean near Kinder Morgan’s coal terminal. Again, according to the Post and
Courier:
…sailboat owners say that one side of their masts are white and [the] other
side dirty gray. The cleaner half faces north, toward the old Navy base. The
dirtier side faces south, toward the Kinder Morgan Energy Partners’ shipping
terminal…
“[Coal dust] is so excessive that it grinds into the top layer of the fiberglass,”
said George Heinemann, a Summerville resident who keeps his boat in the
marina. “The docks are filthy. Even if your boat is clean and your shoe is wet
when you step on the boat, you can see a shoe imprint.”21
A local marine mechanic, Ken Bonerigo, has documented Kinder Morgan’s violations in
detail. According to the Charleston City Paper:
Bonerigo’s videos… clearly show coal spilling into the water and plumes of
dust escaping into the air as the piles are transferred from ship to shore. In
perhaps the most shocking footage, the video “Midnight Clean Up” shows
a crane scooping up water and sloshing it onto the dock to wash the coal
debris into the water rather than sweeping it up.22
And:
Under Kinder Morgan’s watch, violations of the Pollution Control Act and
Water Classifications and Standards have persisted, covering everything from
spillage of petroleum coke into the water to fugitive emissions from ships.
A 2001 investigation uncovered seven violations, resulting in total fines of
just $32,400... Despite subsequent agreements to improve facilities, 2005
investigations found the company responsible for airborne particulate matter
settling on neighboring properties...23
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 5
Bonerigo’s videos depict coal dust on boats, oysters, pilings, and in the water.24
Problems persist. In 2008, for example, South Carolina regulators fined Kinder Morgan
$19,000 for failing to contain coal dust at its facilities, and the state ordered the firm to
upgrade its operations.25
Until recently, Kinder Morgan used the Shipyard River Terminal to import coal, but with
new export potential and rail shipping agreements, the company is slating the terminal for
expansion, raising serious concerns for area residents.26
Coal dust problems for Newport News
One of Kinder Morgan’s largest coal export facilities is Pier IX, in Newport News, Virginia.
Pier IX has the capacity to ship 12 mmt of coal per year and store 1.3 mmt on site. Located
on the James River, it can accommodate capesize vessels.27 (A second coal terminal in
Newport News is operated by Dominion Terminal Associates.)
Coal dust from Kinder Morgan’s coal terminal contaminates a piling at the Cooper River Marina in
Charleston, South Carolina.
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 6
Despite costly upgrades and 44 sprinklers on Kinder Morgan’s site, the community is
routinely blanketed in coal dust. The Daily Press newspaper reported:
[Mayor] Price said not only are the piles unsightly, but the coal dust blown
from the piles has for decades caused problems in the Southeast Community.
Wind picks up the dust in the piles off of Terminal Avenue… coating
neighborhoods in the Southeast Community…28
In fact, the Daily Press reported that Mayor McKinley Price, who lives about a mile from the
coal piers, has complained that coal dust coats his house and outdoor furniture.29
Coal dust problems in Newport News may even include serious health consequences from
Kinder Morgan’s poor coal handling practices. Reports the Daily Press:
While no correlation between the coal dust and asthma has been proven, a
2005 Peninsula Health District study shows that Newport News residents
in the Southeast Community experience asthma rates more than twice the
citywide and state averages.31
Across the bay in Norfolk, Virginia, communities near the Lambert’s Point coal terminal
operated by Norfolk Southern also worry that coal dust is responsible for the vicinity’s
elevated asthma rates. Near Lambert’s Point, coal dust coats cars, windowsills, and plants.
Even the soil is contaminated with coal and high concentrations of arsenic.32
The coal dust problem in Newport News is so severe that city officials are considering
using public money to attempt to mitigate the spread of coal dust from the terminals.33
In a video by the Newport Daily Press, the mayor raises concerns about coal dust. 30
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 7
Bribery and pollution in Portland
Kinder Morgan’s operations in Portland, Oregon, have been home to pollution, lawbreaking,
and even bribery.
In one incident, Kinder Morgan illegally dumped contaminated potassium chloride
into the Pacific Ocean rather than pay landfill charges to dispose of it properly. In 2003,
according to dockworkers, company officials bribed a ship captain $1,100 to haul 159 tons
of the fertilizer component out to sea and dump it.34 Nearly five years later, Kinder Morgan
finally pled guilty to violating the Ocean Dumping Act and settled with the US Attorney’s
Office, agreeing to pay $240,000.35
Previously, in response to a lawsuit against the company for its poor handling of soda ash
in Portland, Kinder Morgan agreed in 2004 to pay $75,000 for spills and to prevent its soda
ash from continuing to pollute the Willamette River.36 But problems continue.
In July 2011, state officials levied a $10,400 fine for a spill at Kinder Morgan’s port site,
in which a fueling vessel spilled 125 gallons of marine fuel into the Willamette River. Then
in October 2011, the US Coast Guard investigated a mysterious oil spill and fish die-off at
Kinder Morgan’s soda ash facility; state officials say it was the deadliest fish kill on the lower
Willamette in nearly a decade.37
Fraud, scams, and thefts
The bribery case in Oregon is part of a pattern of illegal behavior. A fraud investigation by
the FBI determined that between 1997 and 2001 Kinder Morgan systematically scammed
some of its customers, including the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), a publicly-owned
provider of electricity in the mid-South.
At Kinder Morgan’s Cora Terminal in Illinois, company officials used two different
methods to weigh coal for the TVA and other power producers. 38 Operators used certified
scales to take delivery of coal from rail cars, but then weighed outgoing coal by “barge
draft,” typically yielding weights two to three percent heavier than the certified scales. Kinder
Morgan claimed that it was shipping out the same amount of coal that it had received, but
in reality the company was keeping the “excess” coal yielded by the weight differential and
selling it as its own “Red Lightning” coal.
The same federal investigation found that at its Grand River Terminal in Kentucky, Kinder
Morgan officials simply took coal from its customer stockpiles. Altogether, investigators
established that Kinder Morgan took and resold nearly 259,000 tons of coal. In 2007, the US
Attorney’s Office reached a $25 million civil settlement with Kinder Morgan.39
In another case settled in 2007, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fined
Kinder Morgan $613,000 for violations of the US Clean Air Act after regulators discovered
that the company had been illegally mixing an industrial solvent—a dangerous hazardous
waste described as a “cyclohexane mixture”—into unleaded gasoline and diesel. The
company distributed 8 million gallons of the contaminated fuel, which clogged fuel filters
and caused vehicles to break down.40
In 2010, the federal government fined Kinder Morgan $1 million for repeatedly violating
the Clean Air Act at its Port Manatee Terminal in Florida. The US Department of Justice
found that, among other crimes, Kinder Morgan managers lied in permit applications,
stating that the company would control its pollution when they knew the control equipment
was not being operated nor even maintained properly.41
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 8
Currently, Kinder Morgan is under investigation by the EPA for violating the federal
Renewable Fuels Standard. Officials believe that Kinder Morgan purchased conventional
fossil fuels with falsified documents certifying that the fuels came from renewable sources.42
Pipelines result in deaths, felonies, and environmental
disasters
Kinder Morgan’s pipeline operations in the Northwest have had serious problems.
In 2007, a Kinder Morgan pipeline ruptured in Burnaby, British Columbia, forcing 50
families to evacuate their homes as oil rained down on a residential neighborhood.43 CBC
News reported:
Some witnesses said oil shot 30 metres into the air like a geyser for 25
minutes. The black liquid rained down on houses, spewed across two lanes
of traffic and ran downhill into [Burrard Inlet].
“We smelled oil and the smell of gas in [our] home,” said one resident,
Natalie Marson. “Next thing I know, we heard a frantic knock and it was
police officers telling us to get out.”44
Kinder Morgan’s pipeline ruptures in Burnaby, British Columbia, spraying crude oil into the
community. 45
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 9
Then in January 2012, a separate Kinder Morgan storage facility in British Columbia spilled
roughly 29,000 gallons (110,000 liters) of crude oil into the community of Abbotsford.46
The most tragic Kinder Morgan mishap occurred in November 2004 when an excavator
ruptured a high-pressure oil pipeline in the town of Walnut Creek, California. A welding
torch then ignited the fuel, and five workers were killed as the pipeline erupted in a fiery
explosion.
A Kinder Morgan subsidiary was subsequently convicted of six felony counts related to the
Walnut Creek explosion and ordered to pay $15 million in fines.47
Kinder Morgan has had numerous other problems in California. In April 2004, a long
stretch of corroded pipeline ruptured, spilling more than 123,000 gallons of diesel fuel into
the Suisun Marsh, a sensitive saltwater wetland on San Francisco Bay.48 Local environmental
groups allege that the company waited more than a day before notifying authorities that the
spill had occurred.49 Kinder Morgan pled guilty on four counts related to the Suisun Marsh
spill and an unrelated small spill in Los Angeles Harbor.50
In November 2004, an oil pipeline owned by a Kinder Moran subsidiary burst in
the Mojave Desert, sending a jet of fuel 80 feet into the air. The break closed the nearby
A ruptured Kinder Morgan pipeline in Walnut Creek,
California killed five people when it exploded.
Kinder Morgan’s oil pipeline ruptures in endangered
species habitat in the Mojave Desert.
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 10
interstate highway and contaminated more than 10,000 tons of soil in the habitat of the
federally endangered California Desert Tortoise.51
In 2005, Kinder Morgan spilled 70,000 gallons of fuel into Oakland’s inner harbor, and
then 300 gallons into the Donner Lake watershed in the Sierra Nevada.52 And in 2007, the
city of San Diego sued Kinder Morgan for failing to clean up a fuel leak that contaminated
an aquifer.53
Problems plague Kinder Morgan’s pipeline operations elsewhere too. In one high profile
case, a ruptured pipeline in Arizona spilled 19,000 of gasoline into a housing development
under construction.5
More recently, in May 2011, the US Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety
Administration announced a proposed $425,000 fine against Kinder Morgan for safety
violations, following a federal investigation into Kinder Morgan spilling 8,600 of “hazardous
liquid” in New Jersey.55
Then in December 2011, a two-year-old Kinder Morgan natural gas pipeline leaked in
Ohio, spewing 127,000 cubic feet of natural gas and forcing nearby residents to evacuate
their homes. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported:56
The leak in Ohio was the last in a string of problems with REX. One worker
digging the line in Wyoming was incinerated when his bulldozer hit another
buried line; another firm was fined for not marking it properly. In Kansas,
independent inspectors said they received threats when they flagged bad
work.
The troubled REX pipeline is just one example of Kinder Morgan’s labor problems.
Labor violations and unsafe working conditions
Kinder Morgan has numerous labor and workplace safety violations to its name. In February
2011, for example, the US Department of Labor sued Kinder Morgan, arguing that the
firm had been underpaying nearly 4,600 workers for overtime for at least two years.57 The
company agreed to settle the suit, paying out $830,000 in back pay.58
The company claims that it has “better than industry average” safety performance at
its facilities.59 Yet Kinder Morgan has been fined for workplace safety violations over and
over again by the US Occupational Safety & Health Administration, including “serious”
violations at the company’s bulk handling terminal in Portland, Oregon; its coal-handling
terminal in Louisiana; Sparrows Point and Baltimore, Maryland; Rockwood, Illinois;
Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Fernandina Beach, Florida; and Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania.60
In 2011, Kinder Morgan agreed to pay $7.5 million in a wrongful death lawsuit brought
by the family of a Nevada truck driver. The family accused the company of failing to monitor
and warn workers about exposure to toxic chemicals like benzene.61
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 11
Buying influence
In its promotional materials Kinder Morgan claims “we do not make any political
contributions.”62 Yet public information made available by the Center for Responsive Politics
shows that, in fact, Kinder Morgan has spent more than $1.6 million to lobby Congress since
2003, and the firm was continuing to spend money on lobbying in 2011.63
Kinder Morgan’s leadership also makes lavish political gifts. Richard Kinder seems
to focus his political contributions on unregulated “soft money” giving nearly half a
million dollars to the Republican National State Elections Committee since 2001. He also
contributed over $250,000 to Political Actions Committees (PACs) and an additional
$90,000 in “joint fundraising contributions” for Republican candidates. His wife, Nancy
Kinder, donated over $90,000 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee, and since
2001 she has contributed over $340,000 to Republican candidates and PACs, plus more than
$80,000 in joint fundraising contributions.64 Richard and Nancy Kinder were also major
financial supporters of George W. Bush, raising well over $1 million for his two presidential
candidacies.65
Richard Kinder is still making political contributions. In 2011, he gave thousands of
dollars to top Republicans like House Speaker John Boehner and David Dewhurst, a Texas
candidate for the US Senate.66
Even the family’s ostensibly charitable foundation, the Kinder Foundation, may be
pushing a political agenda. The Foundation contributed $10 million to the George W.
Bush Presidential Center in part to support the Bush Institute, the Center’s policy arm that
promotes public policies related to “free market capitalism” and energy production.67
What do the facts about Kinder Morgan mean for the
Northwest?
Despite Kinder Morgan’s assurances to the contrary, there are good reasons to be concerned
about the company’s coal export plans.
Kinder Morgan’s existing coal export operations are clearly dirty and are often in
violation of clean air and clean water laws. Moreover, the company’s overall track record
of crime, fraud, and deceit are worrisome. Until Kinder Morgan can demonstrate that it
has cleaned up its act, decision-makers who want to protect the public interest should be
extremely cautious about inviting Kinder Morgan to do business in the Northwest.
About the Author
Eric de Place is senior researcher at Sightline Institute. Japhet Koteen, Eric Hess, and Pam
MacRae provided research assistance.
Sightline Institute is a not-for-profit research and communication center—a think tank—
based in Seattle.
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 12
Image Credits
1. Louisiana coal terminal image from Google Maps taken as a screenshot on February 22, 2012 by
Sightline Institute.
2. Charleston coal dust image from YouTube taken as a screenshot on February 22, 2012 by Sightline
Institute, http://youtu.be/buogDaisOnY.
3. Newport News mayor image from Newport News Daily Press website, “Newport News Coal
Terminals,” http://www.dailypress.com/videobeta/0e7be2a2-8793-4c77-9022-5d239ff04669/News/
Newport-News-Coal-Terminals taken as a screenshot on February 22, 2012 by Sightline Institute.
4. Burnaby oil pipeline spill taken as a screenshot on February 22, 2012 by Sightline Institute, http://youtu.
be/d6xXAlsLFhs.
5. Walnut Creek fire image from Wikimedia Commons using a Creative Commons ShareAlike license,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WalCrkKMFire.jpg.
6. Mojave River pipeline spill image from US Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.epa.gov/oem/
docs/oil/fss/fss06/key_1.pdf.
Endnotes
1. Erik Siemers, “NW Coal Debate Centers on Jobs, the Future of Energy,” Portland Business Journal,
March 22, 2012, http://sustainablebusinessoregon.com/articles/2012/03/nw-coal-debate-centers-on-jobsthe.
html.
2. Kinder Morgan, “Welcome,” http://www.kindermorgan.com. For the sake of simplicity, this report will
refer to all Kinder Morgan entities simply as “Kinder Morgan.”
3. Michael J. De La Merced, “El Paso Takeover Crowns a Career of Deal-Making,” New York Times
DealBook, October 17, 2011, http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/10/17/el-paso-takeover-crowns-acareer-
of-deal-making/.
4. Clifford Krauss, “Kinder Morgan’s Major Bet on a Boom in Fracking,” New York Times, December 15,
2011 http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/16/business/energy-environment/kinder-morgans-big-bet-onfracking-
boom.html.
5. The Canadian Press, “Kinder Morgan: Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Gets Enough Support To
Go Ahead,” Canadian Business, February 21, 21012, http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/72030--
kinder-morgan-trans-mountain-pipeline-expansion-gets-enough-support-to-go-ahead.
6. Kinder Morgan, “System Map,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/asset_map/KM_System_
Map_B_12-27-10.pdf; and Kinder Morgan, “West Coast – US,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/
business/terminals/west_coast.cfm; and Kinder Morgan, “Canada Region,” http://www.kindermorgan.
com/business/terminals/canada.cfm.
7. Jeff Armstrong, President Terminals Group, “Terminals,” Kinder Morgan presentation, http://www.
kindermorgan.com/investor/presentations/2011_Analysts_Conf_04_Terminals.pdf.
8. Kinder Morgan, “Form 10-K,” US Securities and Exchange Commission, http://www.kindermorgan.
com/investor/2010_KMI_10K.pdf.
9. Jeff Armstrong, President Terminals Group, “Terminals,” Kinder Morgan presentation, http://www.
kindermorgan.com/investor/presentations/2011_Analysts_Conf_04_Terminals.pdf. Kinder Morgan’s
coal exports increased from 7.9 mmt in 2010 to 13.6 mmt in 2011.
10. Port of St. Helens, “Facilities Locations,” http://www.portsh.org/facilities.php; and Erik Siemers,
“Port of St. Helens Aims to be Renewable Energy Hotbed,” Portland Business Journal, http://www.
sustainablebusinessoregon.com/articles/2010/06/port_of_st_helens_aims_to_be_renewable_energy_
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 13
hotbed.html.
11. Scott Learn, “Port of St. Helens Approves Coal Export Agreements With Two Companies,” Oregonian,
January 26, 2012, http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2012/01/port_of_st_helens_
approves_coa.html; and Port Westward Project, “Kinder Morgan: Port Westward Project,” http://
portwestwardproject.com; Port Westward Project, “Kinder Morgan Port Westward Project fact sheet,”
http://portwestwardproject.com/PortWestwardFactSheet.pdf; and Port of St. Helens, “Resources,”
http://www.portsh.org/resources.php.
12. Ambre plans to ship coal by rail to the Port of Morrow in eastern Oregon where the coal would be
loaded onto covered barges. The barges would travel downstream to Port Westward where it would be
loaded directly on maritime vessels. Scott Learn, “Port of St. Helens Approves Coal Export Agreements
With Two Companies,” Oregonian, January 26, 2012, http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.
ssf/2012/01/port_of_st_helens_approves_coa.html.
13. Port Westward Project, “Kinder Morgan: Port Westward Project,” http://portwestwardproject.com.
14. Kinder Morgan, “Houston, TX (Petcoke Operation),” http://www.kindermorgan.com/business/
terminals/petcoke/p-Houston.pdf.
15. Kinder Morgan, “Myrtle Grove, LA Terminal (International Marine Terminal),” http://www.
kindermorgan.com/business/terminals/lower_river/LR-IMT2008-Aug.pdf.
16. Lee Buchsbaum, “Coal Producers & Shippers Work to Increase Export Capacity,” Coal Age, June 9,
2011, http://www.coalage.com/index.php/features/1087-coal-producers-a-shippers-work-to-increaseexport-
capacity.html.
17. Image from Google Maps taken as a screenshot on February 22, 2012 by Sightline Institute.
18. Kinder Morgan, “Shipyard River Terminal,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/business/terminals/
southeast/SE-ShipyardRiver2009-Mar.pdf.
19. Katy Stech and Kyle Stock, “Utilities are Importing More Coal Than Ever,” The Post and Courier,
September 2, 2007, http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2007/sep/02/utilities_are_importing_more_
coal_ever.
20. Katy Stech and Kyle Stock, “Utilities are Importing More Coal Than Ever,” The Post and Courier,
September 2, 2007, http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2007/sep/02/utilities_are_importing_more_
coal_ever.
21. Katy Stech, “Shipping Terminal Faces Opposition to Expansion Plans,” The Post and Courier, April
22, 2007, http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2007/apr/22/shipping_terminal_faces_opposition_
expansion_pla.
22. Stratton Lawrence, “Vigilant Citizen Confronts Kinder Morgan,” Charleston City Paper, August
1, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/vigilant-citizen-confronts-kinder-morgan/
Content?oid=1110798.
23. Stratton Lawrence, “Vigilant Citizen Confronts Kinder Morgan,” Charleston City Paper, August
1, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/vigilant-citizen-confronts-kinder-morgan/
Content?oid=1110798.
24. Stratton Lawrence, “DHEC Not Allowed to Consider Past Violations by Kinder Morgan,” Charleston
City Paper, September 5, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/dhec-not-allowed-toconsider-
past-violations-by-kinder-morgan/Content?oid=1111316; and svosprey’s channel, “Kinder
Morgan-Shipyard Creek,” YouTube, http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL054D090FE8E4A807&fe
ature=plcp.
25. Katy Stech, “Agency Honors Coal Shipper, Hits it With Fine,” The Post and Courier, December 31,
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 14
2008, http://archives.postandcourier.com/archive/arch08/1208/arc12317313217.shtml.
26. North Charleston City Council, “Minutes,” May 10, 2007, https://docs.google.com/View?docid=0ATt8
VNyslCL8ZGc2amY1czdfMTI3aG1rZjhrZGg&pageview=1&hgd=1&embedded=1&hl=en_US.
27. Kinder Morgan, “Pier IX, VA Terminal,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/business/terminals/midatlantic/
MA-PierIX.pdf.
28. Joe Lawlor, “Coal Dust, Piles An Issue for Southeast Newport News,” Daily News, July 16, 2011,
http://articles.dailypress.com/2011-07-16/news/dp-nws-cp-nn-coal-dust-20110716_1_coaldust-coalpiles-
coal-terminals.
29. Joe Lawlor, “Coal Dust, Piles An Issue for Southeast Newport News,” Daily News, July 16, 2011,
http://articles.dailypress.com/2011-07-16/news/dp-nws-cp-nn-coal-dust-20110716_1_coaldust-coalpiles-
coal-terminals.
30. Daily Press, “Newport News Coal Terminals,” video, http://www.dailypress.com/videobeta/0e7be2a2-
8793-4c77-9022-5d239ff04669/News/Newport-News-Coal-Terminals.
31. Joe Lawlor, “Coal Dust, Piles An Issue for Southeast Newport News,” Daily News, July 16, 2011,
http://articles.dailypress.com/2011-07-16/news/dp-nws-cp-nn-coal-dust-20110716_1_coaldust-coalpiles-
coal-terminals.
32. Soil samples contain up to 20 percent coal at a site less than 1 kilometer from the docks and arsenic
levels are 5 times higher than background soil concentrations nearby. William J. Bounds and Karen H.
Johannesson, “Arsenic Addition to Soils from Airborne Coal Dust Originating at a Major Coal Shipping
Terminal,” Water, Air, & Soil Pollution, June 21, 2007, 185: 195-207, http://www.springerlink.com/
content/98146r1160021h13.
33. Joe Lawlor, “Newport News, Coal Terminals Looking Into Wind Fence,” Daily Press, August 1, 2011,
http://articles.dailypress.com/2011-08-01/news/dp-nws-coal-dust-folo-20110801_1_weathersolve-coaldust-
wind-fence.
34. James Pitkin, “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,” Willamette Weekly, August 15, 2007, http://www.
wweek.com/portland/article-7447-voyage_to_the_bottom_of_the_sea.html.
35. Mike Rogoway, “Port Operator Gets Penalty for Dumping,” Oregonian, April 23, 2008, http://www.
oregonlive.com/business/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/business/1208917515292290.xml; and Jim Robison,
“Kinder Morgan Admits Disposing Potash At Sea – Pays $240,000,” Portland Harbor Community
Advisory Group, http://www.portlandharborcag.info/node/10.
36. James Pitkin, “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,” Willamette Weekly, August 15, 2007, http://www.
wweek.com/portland/article-7447-voyage_to_the_bottom_of_the_sea.html.
37. Scott Learn, “Oil Spill, Fish Kill at Port of Portland Terminal Under Investigation,” Oregonian, October
26, 2011, http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2011/10/oil_spill_fish_kill_at_port_of.html.
38. Tennessee Valley Office of the Inspector General, “Multi-Million Dollar Settlement – Largest in History
of TVA OIG,” Tennessee Valley Authority, November 28, 2007, http://oig.tva.gov/PDF/pressreleases/
KinderMorgan.pdf.
39. PR News Wire, “Kinder Morgan Agrees to $25 Million Civil Settlement for Unauthorized Sales of
Customers’ Coal,” US Department of Justice, http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kinder-morganagrees-
to-25-million-civil-settlement-for-unauthorized-sales-of-customers-coal-59896332.html.
40. US Environmental Protection Agency, “Kinder Morgan Consent Agreement and Final Order Fact
Sheet,” http://www.epa.gov/Compliance/resources/cases/civil/caa/kindermorgan-fcsht.html.
41. Kinder Morgan, “Port Manatee Terminal,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/business/terminals/southeast/
SE-PortManatee2009-Mar.pdf; and US Department of Justice, “Kinder Morgan Port Manatee Terminal
LLC To Pay $1 Million Penalty for Environmental Crimes,” US Environmental Protection Agency,
June 22, 2010, http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/cases/criminal/highlights/2010/kinderSightline
Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 15
morgan-06-22-10.pdf.
42. Phillip Brooks, director Air Enforcement Division, US Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.
epa.gov/compliance/resources/novs/civil/caa/fuel/kingermorgan.pdf.
43. Stratton Lawrence, “DHEC Not Allowed to Consider Past Violations by Kinder Morgan,” Charleston
City Paper, September 5, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/dhec-not-allowed-toconsider-
past-violations-by-kinder-morgan/Content?oid=1111316.
44. CBC News, “Cleanup Continues on BC Oil Spill,” Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, July 24, 2007,
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2007/07/24/bc-oilspill.html.
45. westerneye “Oil Companies Plead Guilty to Burnaby Oil Spill,” YouTube, October 3, 2011, http://www.
youtube.com/watch?v=d6xXAlsLFhs.
46. Christina Toth, “Kinder Morgan Needs to Spill More Info: Ross,” Abbotsford Times, January 31, 2012,
http://www.abbotsfordtimes.com/news/Kinder+Morgan+needs+spill+more+info+Ross/6077180/story.
html.
47. Henry K. Lee, “Energy firm convicted in Walnut Creek pipeline blast that killed 5,” San Francisco
Chronicle, September 22, 2007, http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/09/21/
BAFDSB0LD.DTL.
48. US Fish & Wildlife Service and California Department of Fish & Game, “Kinder Morgan Suisun Marsh
Diesel Fuel Oil Spill: Final: Damage Assessment and Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment,” US
Department of the Interior, May 27, 2010, http://www.interior.gov/restoration/library/casedocs/upload/
CA_Kinder_Morgan_Suisun_Marsh_RP_05-10.pdf.
49. Demian Bulwa, Kelly St. John, Peter Fimrite, “Pipeline Spills 60,000 gallons of fuel into Suisun Marsh,”
San Francisco Chronicle, April 30, 2004, http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/04/30/
MNGQ46DALP47.DTL.
50. PR News Wire, “Kinder Morgan Energy Partners Reaches Settlement with California Attorney
General,” April 26, 2005, http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=93621&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=
701533&highlight.
51. John W. Key, “Mojave River Pipeline Spill, San Bernardino County, California,” US Bureau of Land
Management, http://www.epa.gov/osweroe1/docs/oil/fss/fss06/key_2.pdf.
52. Stratton Lawrence, “Vigilant Citizen Confronts Kinder Morgan,” Charleston City Paper, August
1, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/vigilant-citizen-confronts-kinder-morgan/
Content?oid=1110798; and US Environmental Protection Agency, “Kinder Morgan, SFPP agree to pay
nearly $5.3 million to resolve federal and state environmental violations: Settlement addresses Suisun,
Alameda, Donner Lake spills,” May 21, 2007, http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/d0cf6618525a
9efb85257359003fb69d/4bbf4038800cedd6852572e200711592.
53. Stratton Lawrence, “DHEC Not Allowed to Consider Past Violations by Kinder Morgan,” Charleston
City Paper, September 5, 2007, http://www.charlestoncitypaper.com/charleston/dhec-not-allowed-toconsider-
past-violations-by-kinder-morgan/Content?oid=1111316.
54. Phoenix Business Journal, “Kinder Morgan Says Gas Spill Larger Than Originally Estimated,” January
27, 2004, http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2004/01/26/daily19.html.
55. “PHMSA Fines Kinder Morgan $425,000 for New Jersey Pipeline Leak,” Occupational Health &
Safety, May 13, 2011, http://ohsonline.com/articles/2011/05/13/phmsa-fines-kinder-morgan-425000-fornew-
jersey-pipeline-leak.aspx.
56. Craig R. McCoyand and Joseph Tanfani, “Ambitious US gas pipeline illustrates hazards,” Philadelphia
Inquirer, December 10, 2011, http://www.philly.com/philly/news/special_packages/inquirer/marcellusshale/
135273803.html.
Sightline Report • The Facts about Kinder Morgan • April 2012 16
57. Fuel Fix, “Feds Accuse Kinder Morgan of Underpaying on Overtime,” February 7, 2011, http://fuelfix.
com/blog/2011/02/07/feds-accuse-kinder-morgan-of-underpaying-on-overtime.
58. US Department of Labor, “Kinder Morgan to pay more than $830,000 in overtime back wages to 4,659
employees, resolving US Labor Department lawsuit,” July 6, 2011, http://www.dol.gov/opa/media/press/
whd/WHD20111039.htm.
59. Kinder Morgan, “Kinder Morgan 12 Month Safety Performance: All Business Unit Summary as of
02/29/12,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/ehs/ehs_performance/KM_Safety_Performance.pdf; and
Kinder Morgan, “All Business Unit 12-Month External Contractor Safety Performance Summary as of
December 31, 2011,” http://www.kindermorgan.com/ehs/ehs_performance/KM_Contractor_Safety_
Performance.pdf.
60. US Safety & Occupational Health reports for specific locations available here: http://www.osha.gov/
pls/imis/establishment.search?establishment=Kinder%20Morgan&state=all&officetype=all&office=a
ll&startmonth=02&startday=06&startyear=2002&endmonth=02&endday=06&endyear=2012&p_
case=closed&p_start=&p_finish=0&p_sort=12&p_desc=DESC&p_direction=Next&p_show=20.
61. Breaking Lawsuit News, “Kinder Morgan To Pay $7.5 Million in Wrongful Death Case,” http://
breakinglawsuitnews.com/kinder-morgan-to-pay-7-5-million-in-wrongful-death-case.
62. Port Westward Project, “Kinder Morgan Port Westward Project,” fact sheet, http://portwestwardproject.
com/PortWestwardFactSheet.pdf.
63. Center for Responsive Politics, Opensecrets.org database, http://www.opensecrets.org; and US Senate,
“Query the Lobbying Disclosure Act Database,” http://soprweb.senate.gov/index.cfm?event=selectfields.
64. Center for Responsive Politics, Opensecrets.org database, http://www.opensecrets.org.
65. Nancy Kinder was a Bush “Pioneer” in 2000 and a “Ranger” in 2004, honorifics that imply she raised
at least $100,000 in direct campaign contributions in 2000 and at least $250,000 in 2004. After
contributing nearly $1 million to George W. Bush, Kinder even received an invitation to dine with the
Queen of England in 2007. ABC News, “18 Big GOP Donors Dine With the Queen,” May 8, 2007,
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2007/05/18_big_gop_dono.
66. David Dewhurst US Senate, “The Dewhurst Plan,” http://www.daviddewhurst.com/the-dewhurst-plan.
67. Kinder Foundation, “Bush Center,” http://www.kinderfoundation.org/major-gifts/education/bushlibrary.
asp; and George W. Bush Presidential Center, “Economic Growth,” http://www.bushcenter.com/
portal-EG/economic-growth.
 

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