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Chemicals Called Cause of Cancer:Disease hits epidemic proportions PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Thursday, 04 March 2004 10:04
Dennis Bueckert
The Canadian Press

Thursday, March 04, 2004

Manmade chemicals in air, water, food and the workplace are largely to blame for a devastating cancer epidemic that will strike 41 per cent of Canadian males and 38 per cent of females, says a study released Wednesday.

Genetics and lifestyle factors such as smoking and diet can't explain the soaring cancer rates of recent decades, says the report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
Chemicals called cause of cancer
Disease hits epidemic proportions

Dennis Bueckert
The Canadian Press

Thursday, March 04, 2004

Manmade chemicals in air, water, food and the workplace are largely to blame for a devastating cancer epidemic that will strike 41 per cent of Canadian males and 38 per cent of females, says a study released Wednesday.

Genetics and lifestyle factors such as smoking and diet can't explain the soaring cancer rates of recent decades, says the report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

>From 1970 to 1998, the incidence of the disease increased by 35 per cent for men and 27 per cent for women after the effects of population aging have been discounted, say authors Lissa Donner and Robert Chernomas.

When lung cancers are removed from the statistics, the rates still increased by 23.9 per cent for males and 17.1 per cent for females over the period.

The toll is more dramatic when considered over a longer time: In 1921, cancer killed 6.6 per cent of males and 8.6 per cent of females, but now the death rate has risen to 27.4 per cent for men and 23.1 per cent for women, says the report.

There has been a great deal of controversy about the role of environmental contaminants in cancer, and mainstream medical organizations have tended to downplay their importance.

The Canadian Cancer Society estimates five per cent of cancers can be directly linked to contaminants in the environment, representing about 6,400 cases a year in Canada.

Donner and Chernomas say the medical profession is fixated o­n screening, diagnosis and damage control rather than prevention.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 04 March 2004 10:04
 

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