1994 Resolution on canadian Forests passed by the IUCN Print
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow
Monday, 08 April 2019 12:02
1994 Resolution passed by the IUCN General Assembly meeting at Buenos Aires, Tuesday, January 25, 
 
The IUCN (World Conservation Union) an organization representing 125 countries
passed a resolution  calling for a change in forest practices and forest preservation policies in B.C.
 
The voting body of the IUCN is divided into two houses: one house with government representatives, and the other with non-governmental representatives. 
At the 1994 meeting of the IUCN (World Conservation Union) the following resolution  was passed:
by 124 countries with only one country abstaining: Canada. 
 
19.72 REV2 North American Coastal Temperate Forests 
(retyped with January 25 Amendments from the floor)
 
RECOGNISING that temperate coniferous forests, and especially rain forests, constitute a very rare type of ecosystem in the world, originally covering less than one-fifth of one percent of the earth's land surface, and that one half of the earth's original forest of this type occurs along the pacific Coast of North America from northwestern California to southeastern Alaska;
 
UNDERSTANDING  that many endemic and unusual plants and animals occur only in these forests; and that in biomass productivity, the old growth forests (ancient forests) of this biome are unequaled anywhere; 
 
AWARE that more than one half of the Earth's original coastal coniferous forests (ancient forests) have been logged, including more than 40 % of the ancient forests of this type on North America, and that few large unfragmented examples of this type of forest, other than in protected areas, exist outside of British Columbia and Alaska; 
 
MINDFUL  of the fact that such ancient forests on Vancouver Island and on the mid-coast of British Columbia are disappearing at a rapid rate as a result of practices that have, to date, not been ecologically sustainable; 
ALSO MINDFUL that past management practices have been controversial, while the US government has enacted legislation to ensure sustainable management of all forests, questions continue to arise; 
 
UNDERSTANDING  that the Raincoast Conservation Society, the Sierra Club, and the Western Canada Wilderness Committee have proposed a large network of protected areas, including conservation corridors, in areas of such ancient forests on Vancouver Island and the midcoast of British Columbia; 
 
AWARE  of the fact that none of the protected areas that Canada maintains in forest areas along the Pacific Coast have been designated as World Heritage sites under the provisions of the World Heritage Convention[s] and that these ancient forests may be of outstanding universal value; 
The General Assembly of IUCN — the World Conservation Union, at its 19th Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 17-26 January 1994:
 
1. URGES the Government of Canada and the United States to properly manage the temperate coastal coniferous forests of the Pacific Coast of North America by establishing appropriate protected areas and by adopting ecologically oriented systems of forest management which can be permanently sustained and which protect biodiversity;
 
2. CALLS UPON the Governments of Canada and British Columbia to substantially expand the amount of land in networks of protected areas, with conservation corridors, on Vancouver Island and the midcoast of British  Columbia, taking into consideration the recommendations of environmental groups active in the regions such as the Raincoast Conservation Society, the Sierra Club and the Western Canada 
Resolution proposed by Michael McCloskey, Sierra Club USA, in collaboration with Joan Russow (B.C. Canada) member of the IUCN Commission on Education and Communication