Who's Online

We have 142 guests online

Popular

British Columbia Categories
No Access without Consent WEDZIN KWA CHECK POINT UNISTOTEN PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 15 January 2019 16:39
Rise and Resist's photo.
 
JAN16

No More Business as Usual: We Stand with Wet'suwet'en!

 
SITE C contravenes the precautionary principle, risking irreversible harm, misconstrues the equitable remedy of the injunction and discounts indigenous rights. PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 12 January 2019 23:03

 

Posted by Joan Russow
Monday, 30 July 2018 21:34

By JoanRussow  Global Compliance Research Project

Joan Russow founded the Global Compliance Research Project that  calls upon countries to comply with their international obligations and commitments. She has attended many international climate change, and environmental conferences.  Injunctions should be against those who cause irreversible harm not those who strive to prevent irreversible harm. Since Clayoquot Sound, she has been concerned about the misconstruing of injunctions and she is still saying, as she did then, “who are the real criminals?

 

 

Is it a crime to strive to prevent crime or is it a crime to cause and condone it?

 

A. NOT HEEDING AN INJUNCTION AS BEING AN EQUITABLE REMEDY THAT MOVES WITH TIME AND CIRCUMSTANCES AND TREATIES MUST BE COMPLIED WITH IS UNIVERSALLY RECOGNIZED (PACTA SUNT SERVANDA)

B. DISREGARDING “BEING HARMFUL” TO ECOSYSTEMS AS BEING A CRIME TO STATE AND SOCIETY –

C. OVERLOOKING THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE AND CONSERVATION  COMMITMENTS

D DISCOUNTINGA GLOBAL VISION FROM COP21 CONFERENCE  IN PARIS

E. DISRESPECTING RIGHTS OF FUTURE GENERATION

F. DISPENSING WITH UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (UNDRIP)

G. CONCLUSION 

Last Updated on Saturday, 12 January 2019 23:20
Read more...
 
Alex Neve and Sarah Morales: Site C dam still far from ‘point of no return’ PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 November 2018 11:49
Alex Neve and Sarah Morales: Site C dam still far from ‘point of no return’
ALEX NEVE & SARAH MORALES Updated: November 19, 2018
alt

Installation of concrete for the south-bank tailrace wall in July at B.C. Hydro's Site C dam construction project on the Peace River near Fort St. John. B.C. HYDRO / PNG

ADJUST
 
Installation of concrete for the south-bank tailrace wall in July at B.C. Hydro's Site C dam construction project on the Peace River near Fort St. John. B.C. HYDRO / PNG
 
ADJUST
COMMENT
PRINT
Last month, the B.C. Supreme Court handed the Horgan government a victory that may prove much more costly than a defeat.
 
The West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations had asked the court to temporarily suspend construction of the Site C dam, or at least protect critical areas of the Peace Valley while their still unresolved Treaty rights challenge is being considered. On Oct. 24, Justice Warren Milman dismissed the injunction application entirely. This is exactly what the provincial government and B.C. Hydro had asked the court to do.
 
At the same time, the judge ruled that the First Nations’ legal challenge can continue with the possibility that, if the First Nations are able to prove their case, the dam could be stopped before plans to flood the Peace River Valley are completed.
 
In other words, the court told the province, if you so choose, you’re free to continue sinking billions of dollars into a project you might never be allowed to complete.
Read more...
 
'It blows my mind': How B.C. destroys a key natural wildfire defence every year PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 18 November 2018 21:02

Provincial rules require spraying of fire-resistant aspen trees to make way for valuable conifers

 

PLEASE SIGN PETITION 

 

https://www.change.org/p/government-of-british-columbia-stop-spraying-bc-forests-with-herbicide-to-kill-trees-like-poplar-that-wildlife-need?recruiter=728416211&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition

 

Bethany Lindsay · CBC News · Posted: Nov 17, 2018 8:00 AM PT | Last Updated: November 17

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/it-blows-my-mind-how-b-c-destroys-a-key-natural-wildfire-defence-every-year-1.4907358

 

Aspen trees naturally flourish after a wildfire, but they're also less vulnerable to flames than coniferous trees. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)

Last year, 12,812 hectares of B.C. forest was sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. It's an annual event — a mass extermination of broadleaf trees mandated by the province.

The eradication of trees like aspen and birch on regenerating forest stands is meant to make room for more commercially valuable conifer species like pine and Douglas fir.

 

But experts say it also removes one of the best natural defences we have against wildfire, at a time when our warming climate is helping make large, destructive fires more and more common.

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 November 2018 09:11
Read more...
 
Drought in northern and central B.C. has officials worried PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 17 October 2018 08:23

B.C. lands ministry is asking for voluntary reductions in water use so fracking can continue.

The Canadian Press · Posted: Oct 10, 2018 10:35 AM PT | Last Updated: October 10

 

alt

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 November 2018 23:00
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 105

Latest News