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Rwanda Leverages Green Climate Fund’s Opportunities to Fast-Track Sustainable Development PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 12 October 2018 17:31
 
By Aimable Twahirwa
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Greening practices are being adopted in Rwanda which include the terracing on hillsides to control erosion like here in Rulindo district, Northern Rwanda. Credit: Aimable Twahirwa/IPS
 
KIGALI, Oct 12 2018 (IPS) - In a move to achieve its green growth aspirations by 2050, Rwanda has placed a major focus on promoting project proposals that shift away from “business as usual” and have a significant impact on curbing climate change while attracting private investment.
 
The latest report published by the Rwanda Environmental Management Authority (REMA) in 2015 states that the country needs to adapt – and keep adapting – so that Rwandans can become climate resilient and be assured that they can thrive under changing climate conditions.
 
Rwanda is one of a few nations in the world to develop its own climate-related domestic budget to finance mitigation and adaptation projects and leverage international climate finance. Since it was established in 2012, the National Fund for Climate and Environment, commonly known as “FONERWA”, has played a major role in this country’s climate resilient development by financing various green economy projects.
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New study links common herbicides and antibiotic resistance PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 12 October 2018 11:54
 
12 October 2018
 
A new study finds that bacteria develop antibiotic resistance up to 100,000 times faster when exposed to the world’s most widely used herbicides, Roundup (glyphosate) and Kamba (dicamba) and antibiotics compared to without the herbicide.
 
BY Jack Heinemann
A new study finds that bacteria develop antibiotic resistance up to 100,000 times faster when exposed to the world’s most widely used herbicides, Roundup (glyphosate) and Kamba (dicamba) and antibiotics compared to without the herbicide.
 
Jack Heinemann
 
 
This study adds to a growing body of evidence that herbicides used on a mass industrial scale, but not intended to be antibiotics, can have profound effects on bacteria, with potentially negative implications for medicine’s ability to treat infectious diseases caused by bacteria, says University of Canterbury scientist Professor Jack Heinemann, one of the study’s authors.
 
“The combination of chemicals to which bacteria are exposed in the modern environment should be addressed alongside antibiotic use if we are to preserve antibiotics in the long-term,” he says.
 
An important finding of the new study was that even in cases where the herbicides increase the toxicity of antibiotics they also significantly increased the rate of antibiotic resistance, which the study’s authors say could be contributing to the greater use of antibiotics in both agriculture and medicine.
 
Previously these researchers found that exposure to the herbicide products Roundup, Kamba and 2,4-D or the active ingredients alone most often increased resistance, but sometimes increased susceptibility of potential human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli depending on the antibiotic.[1]
 
“We are inclined to think that when a drug or other chemical makes antibiotics more potent, that should be a good thing. But it also makes the antibiotic more effective at promoting resistance when the antibiotic is at lower concentrations, as we more often find in the environment” Professor Heinemann says.
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U.S. conservation groups decry B.C. decision to allow logging in Skagit River system PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 11 October 2018 10:50
 
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/british-columbia/article-us-conservation-groups-decry-bc-decision-to-allow-logging-in/?cmpid=rss&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=Watershed+Watch+Email+List&utm_campaign=c1e8ad9a9b-SALMON_NEWS_2018_08_29_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_405944b1b5-c1e8ad9a9b-166906521&mc_cid=c1e8ad9a9b&mc_eid=57336e93bf
 
 
Published October 9 2018
The B.C. government, which opposes the expansion of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline because of the potential threat to the Salish Sea’s marine environment and its endangered killer whales, is putting those same waters at risk by approving logging in a sensitive watershed, a coalition of U.S. conservation organizations says.
 
The Skagit River system flows south from B.C. through Washington State and into Puget Sound, including waters that are critical to chinook salmon – the primary source of food for the southern resident killer whales.
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UN Experts Warn of 'Climate Catastrophe' by 2040 Without 'Rapid' and 'Unprecedented' Global Action PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 08 October 2018 16:27

"The climate crisis is here and already impacting the most vulnerable," notes 350.org's program director. "Staying under 1.5ºC is now a matter of political will."

 

byJessica Corbett, staff writer Common Dreams

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change held a press conference on its new report in South Korea on Monday.

IPCC presser

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change held a press conference on its new report in South Korea on Monday. (Photo: @IPCC_CH/Twitter)

 

Underscoring the need for "rapid, far-reaching, and unprecedented" changes to life as we know it to combat the global climate crisis, a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)—the United Nations' leading body for climate science—details what the world could look like if the global temperature rises to 1.5°C versus 2°C (2.7°F versus 3.6°F) above pre-industrial levels, and outlines pathways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty.

Last Updated on Monday, 08 October 2018 18:56
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Mexico’s new science minister is a plant biologist who opposes transgenic crops PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 06 October 2018 14:55
I'm not a Luddite who is scared of technology," Elena Álvarez-Buylla says. GDA/EL UNIVERSAL/MéXICO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
 

"I'm not a Luddite who is scared of technology," Elena Álvarez-Buylla says.

GDA/EL UNIVERSAL/MéXICO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mexico’s new science minister is a plant biologist who opposes transgenic crops
By Lizzie WadeOct. 4, 2018 , 11:30 AM
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/10/mexico-s-new-science-minister-plant-biologist-who-opposes-transgenic-crops
 
 
MEXICO CITY—In early June, evolutionary developmental biologist Elena Álvarez-Buylla received an out-of-the-blue phone call from the campaign of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, then the front-runner in Mexico's presidential election, with a question. If López Obrador won, would she consider becoming the next director of the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt), the country's science ministry and primary granting agency? "My first reaction was to say, ‘I can't,’" recalls Álvarez-Buylla, a professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) here. "I have a great passion for scientific research," and she couldn't imagine leaving the laboratory.
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