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NAFTA THE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROVISIONS IN NAFTA AND THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT'S PUBLISHED INTERPRETATION OF THESE PROVISIONS. PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 16 August 2018 11:46
 
 
1993 NAFTA THE DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROVISIONS IN NAFTA AND THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT'S PUBLISHED INTERPRETATION OF THESE PROVISIONS.
 
Prepared for presentation at a panel discussion on NAFTA
by
 
JOAN RUSSOW
DOCTORAL CANDIDATE
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
 
May, 23, 1993
 
BACKGROUND 
In all three countries, Canada, Mexico and the U.S., citizens and organizations are concerned about the misplacing of government priorities, 
 The delusion of public process, 
 The exploitation of the labour force, 
The inequitable distribution of resources,  
 The disenfranchisement of the many, 
 The violation of human rights and 
The denigration of social justice
Read more...
 
GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC RISKS AND THE SCIENCE COUNCIL OF CANADA: THE CASE OF CLIMATE CHANGE PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 16 August 2018 10:04
 
GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC RISKS AND THE SCIENCE COUNCIL OF CANADA: THE CASE OF CLIMATE CHANGE
Rod Dobell and Joan Russow University of Victoria
March, 1993
 
Annex to Contribution Number D.1, Version 2 Submission to Social Learning project at the Kennedy Centre, Harvard University
for the project on Social Learning in the Management of Global Environmental Risks.
 
Please send comments to R. Dobell and J. Russow, Department of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria,  Canada. Fax-604-721-8849
This work was partially supported by the John  D and Catherine T. MacArthur  Foundation and the Atmospheric Environment Service of the Government of Canada
This Annex examines the treatment of climate change in publications of the Science Council of Canada, identifying for expository purposes five phases:
Phase 1. (1968-1976). In this phase the Council moved from the early formulation  in 1968 of goals and policies related to the environment , and early exploration of scientific data related to the global warming issue in 1972, to a Conference sponsored by the Council  in 1975 on "Living with Climatic Change" and the publication of the proceedings from this conference in 1976.
Phase 2. (1977) The Science Council published its significant document, Conserver Society: Resource Uncertainties and the Need for New  Technologies. In the same year, the Council also published documents related to environmental and health regulations, and the Government of Canada passed legislation requiring environmental regulations to be subjected to Socio-Economic Impact Analysis (SEIA). 
Phase 3. (1978-1983)  In this third phase, Council documents are more strongly oriented toward economic issues, coupled with a few significant publications on regulation of activities affecting the environment. 
Phase 4. (1984-87) Pre-Brundtland: During this period of Brundtland Commission hearings , there was in Council policy documents a continued emphasis on the economy; if there was concern for sustainability it was  primarily for economic sustainability. 
Phase 5. (1988-1992) Post-Brundtland: In this phase the Council embraced the expansive interpretation which the National Task Force on the Environment and the Economy gave to the concept of "sustainable development".
Last Updated on Thursday, 16 August 2018 10:22
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Dozens dead in Yemen as bus carrying children hit by airstrike PDF Print E-mail
Peace News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 11 August 2018 12:20

 

 

Red Cross says strike hit bus at market in Dahyan, in rebel-held north of country

 
By Saeed Kamali Dehghan @SaeedKD
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/09/dozens-dead-in-yemen-as-bus-carrying-children-hit-by-airstrike-icrc
 
Thu 9 Aug 2018 18.46 BST First published on Thu 9 Aug 2018 11.38 BST
 
A doctor treats an injured child.
 A doctor treats an injured child.
 
Injured Yemeni children receive medical treatment - see video
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/09/dozens-dead-in-yemen-as-bus-carrying-children-hit-by-airstrike-icrc
 
Saudi Arabia is facing an international outcry after at least 29 children were among dozens of civilians killed by a US-backed Saudi-led coalition airstrike that hit a bus in Yemen’s Houthi rebel-held north.
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Indigenous Peoples Least Responsible for the Climate Crisis PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:50

 

By Jamison Ervin is Manager, UNDP’s Global Programme on Nature for Development 
 
This article is part of a series of stories and op-eds initiated by IPS on the occasion of the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples, on August 9.

alt

Photo - UNDP/ PNG-Bougainville People celebration

UNITED NATIONS, Aug 9 2018 (IPS) - Indigenous peoples, who comprise less than five percent of the world’s population, have the world’s smallest carbon footprint, and are the least responsible for our climate crisis. Yet because their livelihoods and wellbeing are intimately bound with intact ecosystems, indigenous peoples disproportionately face the brunt of climate change, which is fast becoming a leading driver of human displacement.

In Papua New Guinea, for example, residents of the Carteret Islands – one of the most densely populated islands in the country – have felt the effects of climate change intensify over recent years. With a high point on their islands of just 1.2 meters above sea level, every community member is now at risk from sea level rise and storm surges.

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:54
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Oilsands could eventually acidify an area the size of Germany, study says PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 26 July 2018 12:05
 
By BOB WEBERThe Canadian Press
Wed., July 25, 2018
The largest and most precise study yet done on acid emissions from Alberta’s oilsands suggests they could eventually damage an area almost the size of Germany.
 
The study finds that in 2013 more than 330,000 square kilometres in northern Alberta and Saskatchewan absorbed acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta. A new study finds that in 2013, more than 330,000 square kilometres received acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
 
A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta. A new study finds that in 2013, more than 330,000 square kilometres received acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
 
 
lakes.  (JEFF MCINTOSH / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO)
 
“This work is a warning,” said Paul Makar, an Environment Canada scientist and lead author on the paper published in the Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.
 
“If emissions continue at 2013 levels, there will be ecosystem damage over a very large area.”
Read more...
 
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