Who's Online

We have 1241 guests online

Popular

Indigenous Peoples Least Responsible for the Climate Crisis E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:50

 

By Jamison Ervin is Manager, UNDP’s Global Programme on Nature for Development 
 
This article is part of a series of stories and op-eds initiated by IPS on the occasion of the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples, on August 9.

alt

Photo - UNDP/ PNG-Bougainville People celebration

UNITED NATIONS, Aug 9 2018 (IPS) - Indigenous peoples, who comprise less than five percent of the world’s population, have the world’s smallest carbon footprint, and are the least responsible for our climate crisis. Yet because their livelihoods and wellbeing are intimately bound with intact ecosystems, indigenous peoples disproportionately face the brunt of climate change, which is fast becoming a leading driver of human displacement.

In Papua New Guinea, for example, residents of the Carteret Islands – one of the most densely populated islands in the country – have felt the effects of climate change intensify over recent years. With a high point on their islands of just 1.2 meters above sea level, every community member is now at risk from sea level rise and storm surges.

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:54
Read more...
 
Kinder Morgan expansion, contravenes the precautionary principle, risking irreversible harm, misconstrues the equitable remedy of the injunction and discounts indigenous rights. E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 30 July 2018 21:34

By JoanRussow  Global Compliance Research Project

Joan Russow founded the Global Compliance Research Project that  calls upon countries to comply with their international obligations and commitments. She has attended many international climate change, and environmental conferences. She walked 76 km from Victoria to Burnaby against Kinder Morgan. Injunctions should be against those who cause irreversible harm not those who strive to prevent irreversible harm. Since Clayoquot Sound, she has been concerned about the misconstruing of injunctions and she is still saying, as she did then, “who are the real criminals?

 

J1 under Mt. Baker©Stefan Jacobs

/www.orcanetwork.org/nathist/salishorcas1.html

 

 

Is it a crime to strive to prevent crime or is it a crime to cause and condone it?

 

A. NOT HEEDING AN INJUNCTION AS BEING AN EQUITABLE REMEDY THAT MOVES WITH TIME AND CIRCUMSTANCES AND TREATIES MUST BE COMPLIED WITH IS UNIVERSALLY RECOGNIZED (PACTA SUNT SERVANDA)

B. DISREGARDING “BEING HARMFUL” TO ECOSYSTEMS AS BEING A CRIME TO STATE AND SOCIETY –

C. OVERLOOKING THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE AND CONSERVATION  COMMITMENTS

D DISCOUNTINGA GLOBAL VISION FROM COP21 CONFERENCE  IN PARIS

E. DISRESPECTING RIGHTS OF FUTURE GENERATION

F. DISPENSING WITH UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (UNDRIP)

G.  JEOPARDIZING FUTURE CONSERVATION PROJECTS IN THE SALISH SEA,

H. FAILING TO APPLY THE DOCTRINE OF LEGITIMATE EXPECTATION

I. IGNORING A MEANS TO CANCEL KINDER MORGAN WITHOUT A REPRISAL FROM NAFTA UNDER CHAPTER  11

J. CLOSING THE EYES TO A POTENTIAL BOONDOGGLE OF AN INVESTMENT

K. CONCLUSION  AND POEM BY NNIMMO BASSEY

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 August 2018 02:46
Read more...
 
Oilsands could eventually acidify an area the size of Germany, study says E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 26 July 2018 12:05
 
By BOB WEBERThe Canadian Press
Wed., July 25, 2018
The largest and most precise study yet done on acid emissions from Alberta’s oilsands suggests they could eventually damage an area almost the size of Germany.
 
The study finds that in 2013 more than 330,000 square kilometres in northern Alberta and Saskatchewan absorbed acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta. A new study finds that in 2013, more than 330,000 square kilometres received acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
 
A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta. A new study finds that in 2013, more than 330,000 square kilometres received acid deposits high enough to eventually damage life in rivers and lakes.
 
 
lakes.  (JEFF MCINTOSH / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO)
 
“This work is a warning,” said Paul Makar, an Environment Canada scientist and lead author on the paper published in the Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.
 
“If emissions continue at 2013 levels, there will be ecosystem damage over a very large area.”
Read more...
 
Palestine to Lead UN’s Largest Group of Developing Nations E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 24 July 2018 11:20

 

Reprint |    | alt Print | 
alt

 

Credit: Institute for Palestine Studies

 

UNITED NATIONS, Jul 24 2018 (IPS) - The Group of 77 (G77) — the largest single coalition of developing countries at the United Nations– is to be chaired by Palestine, come January.

“It’s a historical first, both for Palestine and the G77,” an Asian diplomat told IPS, pointing out that Palestine will be politically empowered to collectively represent 134 UN member states, including China.

Created in June 1964, the 54-year-old Group comprises over 80 per cent of the world’s population and approximately two-thirds of the United Nations membership

Read more...
 
DESTABILIZING VENEZUELA- RAMIFICATIONS ON LATIN AMERICA, AND TIME LINE E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 23 July 2018 12:12
 
By joan Russow PhD
Global Compliance Research Project
 
Image result for venezuelan cartoon of us intervention
 
 
Notes for a presentation August 17, 2018 NOTE ARTICLE UNDER CONSTRUCTION
 
 
A. Destabilization of Venezuela
B. Use of destabilization in Venezuela in elections in Latin America
C. Brief time line in Bolivia, Colombia, Chile  Honduras, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala Mexico,  Nicaragua Venezuela  
Last Updated on Thursday, 02 August 2018 00:00
Read more...
 
hile Has Medicine Against Desertification, But Does Not Take It E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 19 July 2018 06:33

By Orlando Milesi

Hundreds of children, many from rural schools in the Coquimbo region, have visited the fog catchers in Cerro Grande as part of an educational programme to raise awareness among future generations about the importance of rational use of water in Chile. Credit: Foundation un Alto en el Desierto

Hundreds of children, many from rural schools in the Coquimbo region, have visited the fog catchers in Cerro Grande as part of an educational programme to raise awareness among future generations about the importance of rational use of water in Chile. Credit: Foundation un Alto en el Desierto

OVALLE, Chile, Jul 17 2018 (IPS) - The retention of rainwater which otherwise is lost at sea could be an excellent medicine against the advance of the desert from northern to central Chile, but there is no political will to take the necessary actions, according to experts and representatives of affected communities.

“One of the priority actions, especially in the Coquimbo region, is the retention of rainwater. That is key because since we have eroded and degraded soil and we have occasional rains in winter, the soil is not able to retain more than 10 percent of the water that falls,” Daniel Rojas, the head of the Peña Blanca farmers’ association, told IPS.

“The rest ends up in the sea,” added Rojas, the head of the association of 85 small-scale farmers, located 385 km north of Santiago, which has 6,587 hectares, 98 percent of them rainfed, irrigated exclusively by rainfall.

Read more...
 
Mexico Votes Overwhelmingly for "Change" by Electing Lopez Obrador President, CEPR Experts Say E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 01 July 2018 19:27
BY Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it via mail.salsalabs.net 
8:03 PM (21 minutes ago)
to me 
New Release from CEPR
View this email in your browser
CEPR
Mexico Votes Overwhelmingly for "Change" by Electing López Obrador President, CEPR Experts Say
 
Sluggish Economy, Corruption, Crime Fueled Voters’ Discontent with the Status Quo
For Immediate Release: July 1, 2018
Contact: Dan Beeton, 202-239-1460
 
Washington, DC and Jilotepec, Mexico ? Voters in Mexico have "made history" and opted for change in electing Andrés Manuel López Obrador president today, experts from the Center for Economic and Policy Research, based in Washington, said. Candidates from López Obrador's National Regeneration Movement (Morena) party are also projected to have a plurality of seats in the Chamber of Deputies.
Read more...
 
Leopoldo López Is Not Venezuela’s Savior E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 29 June 2018 15:20
Leopoldo López Is Not Venezuela’s Savior
Despite US support, the revolutionary has only succeeded in pushing like-minded opposition leaders far, far away.
By Greg Grandin  the NATION
JULY 29, 2015
https://www.thenation.com/article/leopoldo-lopez-is-not-venezuelas-savior/JULY 29, 2015
 
JULY 29, 2015
 
Caracas_Venezuela_protest_rtr_img

Opposition supporters protest against the Venezuelan government and in support of 

 
fbtwmailPrint
Caracas_Venezuela_protest_rtr_img
Opposition supporters protest against the Venezuelan government and in support of jailed opposition leaders Leopoldo Lopez and Antonio Ledezma on February 28, 2015. (Reuters / Carlos Garcia Rawlins)
 
Ready To Join The Resistance?
Sign up for Take Action Now and we’ll send you three actions every Tuesday. 
Enter Email
You will receive occasional promotional offers for programs that support The Nation’s journalism. You can read our Privacy Policy here.
 
Roberto Lovato has just published a great investigative essay in Foreign Policy on Leopoldo López, the jailed darling of Venezuela’s opposition. López is celebrated in the US press as a cross between Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. He is handsome, like King, and, like Gandhi, occasionally shirtless. Newsweek blushes over López’s “twinkling chocolate-colored eyes and high cheekbones.” He is, apparently, a “revolutionary who has it all”: an “attractive and supportive wife, two children who get along with each other and impossibly adorable Labrador puppies.” Everything except a revolution.
Last Updated on Friday, 29 June 2018 15:31
Read more...
 
Will it Be “The Economy, Stupid” in Mexico? E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 28 June 2018 10:53

 

By Center for Economic Research (CEPR)
 
alt
 
 
 
On the eve of historic elections, and five years after leaders of Mexico’s then most prominent political parties agreed on a “Pact for Mexico,” the Mexican economy is mired in a “trap of low investment and low growth,” and imperiled by liberalization of financial markets. These are the findings of a new CEPR report. With the left-leaning candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador far ahead in the polls, co-director Mark Weisbrot was interviewed about how the lackluster 
Last Updated on Thursday, 28 June 2018 11:33
Read more...
 
B.C. pension fund manager pouring billions of public workers’ retirement dollars into fossil fuels, report finds E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 26 June 2018 08:46
B.C. pension fund manager pouring billions of public workers’ retirement dollars into fossil fuels, report finds
By JENNY PENGStarMetro Vancouver
https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/2018/06/25/bc-investment-management-corporation-still-betting-on-fossil-fuels.htmlMon., June 25, 2018
 
A new report outlines how many pension plans from B.C.’s public sector are invested in the fossil fuel industry through the B.C. Investment Management Corporation.
 
VANCOUVER—Policy analysts and researchers are calling out a large, but low-profile, pension fund manager for pooling billions of dollars worth of public workers’ retirement plans into the fossil fuel industry.
 
 
The findings come in a report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and University of Victoria, which examines where British Columbian public servant pension funds are invested.
 
 
An examination of the B.C. Investment Management Corporation’s investment portfolio, the fourth largest such fund manager in Canada, found it invested $3 billion in the top 200 public fossil fuel companies.
 
The BCI oversees pensions funds for 500,000 people through 11 provincial government plans, including WorkSafe BC and the teachers’ pension plan.
 
Critics say investing in oil and gas hinders Canada’s ability to meet its Paris Agreement commitments signed in April 2016, which seeks to limit the rise in Earth’s average temperature to 2 C.
 
“You see the BCI calling themselves ‘responsible investors’ throughout much of their publications but we find that really, in the context of climate change, this is absolutely misinformation,” said Zoë Yunker, University of Victoria graduate and co-author of the report released Monday.
Read more...
 
As Trump tightens asylum rules, thousands of Venezuelans find a warm welcome in Miami E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 24 June 2018 12:08
 
 
Venezuelan citizens living in Miami line up last year to vote in a nonbinding referendum against the Venezuelan government. The vote was organized by groups seeking to undermine Venezuela’s unpopular president, Nicolás Maduro. (Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images)
By Anthony Faiola and Nick Miroff
 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/even-as-trump-tightens-asylum-rules-thousands-of-venezuelans-find-a-warm-welcome-in-miami/2018/05/15/5e747fec-52cf-11e8-a551-5b648abe29ef_story.html?utm_term=.357892d28b78May 18
 
 
 
Venezuelan citizens living in Miami line up last year to vote in a nonbinding referendum against the Venezuelan government. The vote was organized by groups seeking to undermine Venezuela’s unpopular president, Nicolás Maduro. (Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images)

 Venezuelans seeking asylum in the United States are arriving to this city in soaring numbers — and receiving a far warmer welcome than the Central American migrants President Trump wants to block at the Mexican border.

Last year, 27,629 Venezuelans petitioned U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for asylum, an 88 percent increase from 2016 and up from 2,181 in 2014. So far this year, the number of Venezuelans who have applied — nearly all of them in Miami — is almost three times as great as any other nationality, according to the latest USCIS asylum data.

Unlike the Central Americans who wade illegally across the Rio Grande and turn themselves in to U.S. border guards, the Venezuelans typically land at the Miami airport with tourist and business visas.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 3

Latest News