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COP21 leaves nuclear dream adrift PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 01 January 2016 18:08

BY Paul Brown The Ecologist 

1st January 2015

Qinshan Phase III Units 1 & 2

ake a significant contribution to China's future electricity needs. Photo: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited via Wikimedia Commons.

Charlatans, or planetary saviours? Post-Paris views on the nuclear industry suggest few experts believe it will bring closer a world rid of fossil fuels, writes Paul Brown. Despite the best efforts of nuclear lobbyists, no revival is due any time soon.

There are still some who hope that nuclear power will magically undergo a massive expansion. The evidence so far suggests that this is a false hope, one that is best abandoned if we are to deal with climate change with the seriousness the problem demands.

In Paris, in early December, the advocates of nuclear power made yet another appeal to world leaders toadopt their technology as central to saving the planet from dangerous climate change.

Yet analysis of the plans of 195 governments that signed up to the Paris Agreement, each with their own individual schemes on how to reduce national carbon emissions, show thatnearly all of them exclude nuclear power.

Only a few big players - China, Russia, India, South Korea and the United Kingdom - still want an extensive programme of new-build reactors.

To try to understand why this is so the US-based Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists asked eight experts in the field to look at the future of nuclear power in the context of climate change.

One believed that large-scale new-build nuclear power "could and should" be used to combat climate change, and another thought nuclear could play a role, although a small one.

The rest thought new nuclear stations were too expensive, too slow to construct and had too many inherent disadvantages to compete with renewables.

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 January 2016 00:25
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cop21 “RED LINES”: AVENUE DE LA GRANDE ARMÉE MORE THAN 10,000 PEOPLE EXPECTED TO COME PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 11 December 2015 18:58

 

MEDIA MEETING POINT:

WHERE: 2 Tunnel de l'Étoile, 75017 Paris --  Google map link here.

WHEN: Saturday 12th December - 11:00am CET


ACTION WILL TAKE PLACE AT:  Avenue de la Grande Armée, Arc de Triomphe

A major public demonstrations is planned for this Saturday, 12th December. As the climate talks come to an end, 350.org, Attac, Confédération Paysanne, Réseau Sortir du Nucléaire, Climate Games and others[1] are taking the message to the streets tomorrow at 12PM (that is 12.12.12). Defying a ban on public protests that has been implemented in France under the State of Emergency, campaigners are planning for a gathering of thousands.

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COP21: “1.5 Degrees is More Than Enough” Arctic and Island States Call on Leaders to Agree to Deep Cuts to Greenhouse Gas Emissions PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 09 December 2015 21:35

PRESS RELEASE

 

“1.5 Degrees is More Than Enough”

Arctic and Island States Call on Leaders to Agree to Deep Cuts to Greenhouse Gas Emissions

 

December 9, 2015 – Paris, France – Voices from some of the world’s coldest and hottest regions were raised in unison today calling for ambitious greenhouse gas emissions targets that would limit the average global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

 

The call was issued by Indigenous Peoples’ representatives from the Inuit Circumpolar Council, Saami Council, the Pacific and the Government of the Seychelles after the release of the latest draft negotiating text at the climate change negotiations underway in Paris.

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HERACKLES FARMS: From Forest to Palm oil PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 06 December 2015 05:35

By Aaron Yancho kaah  and Ngalla Killian

bamenda cameroon

 

alt

 

In the thick tropical forest of Ndian division in Cameroon's South West Region, a group of chimpanzees skip from tree branch to tree branch as they forage for food . This pristine forest is also  sanctuary to a wide  variety of mammals including  Monkeys, Antelopes, insects  and birds.

 

Nonetheless the bio-diversity of this forest is at risk.  The US base Agro Industrial Cooperation Herackles Farms has established a 73000 hectares of plantation plams seedlings in this vast  forest reserve. This project is in the heart of one of Africa's most cherished bio diversity and forest zones. This 99 years lice granted Herackles by the Cameroon government  is adjacent several  important reserves including the world renowned  Korup national park.

 

The Herackles palm oil plantation that has covered farm land and forest patches also has left over 14000 people without a livelihood. Many local people in this community have being opposed to this project. "We  dont   want them because they are no advantages that our people here will have  and we don't need them. We  don't need them we are fine." remarked  Ayuk Sunde a  resident of the locality. "And if they come to say they want to take this land from us  we are not ready for it" cried another villager Thomas Ojong.

Last Updated on Sunday, 06 December 2015 05:41
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Confined livestock management help young farmers to plant trees for fodders and to make an income in Cameroon PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 06 December 2015 04:41


By AARON KAAH,for IPS. reporting in Cameroon  .
alt

 

The scarcity of grazing land and the rampant farmer grazer conflicts

in most communities has led to confined livestock management in barns,

fences and stables across Cameroon. In the semi urban peripheries of

most towns where the prices of dairy products like fresh milk, yogurt

and butter are sky rocking every day; most young farmers have taken up

zero grazing livestock management to get food and to make income.

Last Updated on Sunday, 06 December 2015 05:44
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Against the Odds, Caribbean Doubles Down for 1.5 Degree Deal in Paris PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 24 November 2015 04:28

By Zadie Neufville

The high cost of electricity in the Caribbean is pushing many to install alternative energy sources. Credit: Zadie Neufville/IPS

The high cost of electricity in the Caribbean is pushing many to install alternative energy sources. Credit: Zadie Neufville/IPS

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov 23 2015 (IPS) - Negotiators from the 15-member Caribbean Community (CARICOM) are intent on striking a deal to keep the global temperature rise at 1.5 degrees of pre-industrial levels, but many fear that a 10-year-old agreement to buy cheap petroleum from Venezuela puts their discussions in jeopardy.

Across the region, countries are rolling out their “1.5 to Stay Alive” Campaign to raise awareness about the effects of climate change, while building momentum for the region’s negotiating position ahead of the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (UNCCC) in France in December.

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The Elephant in Paris – Guns and Greenhouse Gases PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 15 November 2015 20:21
Published on

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2015/11/13/elephant-paris-guns-and-greenhouse-gases

by

alt

Though the Pentagon itself warns about the coming dangers posed by a warming planet, there is evidence that many players in the corporate-military-security industrial nexus are already seeing climate change not just as a threat but an opportunity. (Photo: Stephen Melkisethian/flickr/cc)

There is no shortage of words in the latest negotiating document for the UN climate negotiations taking place in Paris at the end of November – 32,731 words to be precise and counting. Yet strangely there is one word you won’t find: military. It’s a strange omission, given that the US military alone is the single largest user of petroleum in the world and has been the main enforcer of the global oil economy for decades.

Last Updated on Sunday, 15 November 2015 20:30
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The World Meterological Organization:New Report on Extreme Events PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 10 November 2015 08:51

 by The World Meterological Organizaation

https://www.wmo.int/media/content/new-report-extreme-events

November 6 2015

 

Human activities, such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use, influenced specific extreme weather and climate events in 2014, including tropical cyclones in the central Pacific, heavy rainfall in Europe, drought in East Africa, and stifling heat waves in Australia, Asia, and South America, according to a new report released today. The report, "Explaining Extreme Events of 2014 from a Climate Perspective" published by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, addresses the natural and human causes of individual extreme events from around the world in 2014, including Antarctica. NOAA scientists served as three of the five lead editors on the report.

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/news/explaining-extreme-events-2014

Last Updated on Monday, 23 November 2015 06:06
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Elevated CO2 Levels Directly Affect Human Cognition, New Harvard Study Show PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 27 October 2015 20:20

 OCT 26, 2015 10:05AM

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/10/26/3714853/carbon-dioxide-impair-brain/

 

 

CREDIT: CLIMATE INTERACTIVE

In a landmark public health finding, a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health finds that carbon dioxide (CO2) has a direct and negative impact on human cognition and decision-making. These impacts have been observed at CO2 levels that most Americans — and their children — are routinely exposed to today inside classrooms, offices, homes, planes, and cars.

Carbon dioxide levels are inevitably higher indoors than the baseline set by the outdoor air used for ventilation, a baseline that is rising at an accelerating rate thanks to human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels. So this seminal research has equally great importance for climate policy, providing an entirely new public health impetus for keeping global CO2 levels as low as possible.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 October 2015 20:25
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Terrace Farming – an Ancient Indigenous Model for Food Security PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 22 October 2015 10:02

By Marianela Jarroud

Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. Credit: Marianela Jarroud/IPS

Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. Credit: Marianela Jarroud/IPS

CASPANA, Chile, Oct 21 2015 (IPS) - Terrace farming as practiced from time immemorial by native peoples in the Andes mountains contributes to food security as a strategy of adaptation in an environment where the geography and other conditions make the production of nutritional foods a complex undertaking.

This ancient prehispanic technique, still practiced in vast areas of the Andes highlands, including Chile, “is very important from the point of view of adaptation to the climate and the ecosystem,” said Fabiola Aránguiz.

“By using terraces, water, which is increasingly scarce in the northern part of the country, is utilised in a more efficient manner,” Aránguiz, a junior professional officer on family farming with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), told IPS from the agency’s regional headquarters in Santiago, some 1,400 km south of the town of Caspana in Chile’s Atacama desert.

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