Who's Online

We have 742 guests online

Popular

International Earth Articles
Battle of the Desert (and III): UNCCD ‘s Louise Baker on The Silk Road PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 24 November 2016 08:34

By Baher Kamal

Louise Baker

Louise Baker

 

BONN / ROME, Nov 23 2016 (IPS) - Marking this year’s World Day to Combat Desertification last June, the United Nations announced the launch of a China-United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) Belt and Road Joint Action initiative to curb Desertification along the Silk Road.

UNCCD  is the key United Nations legal framework to combat desertification. IPS interviews Louise Baker, Coordinator External Relations, Policy and Advocacy Unit, UNCCD about the current effects of drought in the countries, which are expected to benefit from this initiative?

Drought is a complex natural hazard that causes more deaths and displaces more people than any other natural disaster. Its socio-economic and environmental impacts are severe and far-reaching, Baker states.

Last Updated on Friday, 25 November 2016 15:47
Read more...
 
COP22 MUST AVOID THE SYSTEMIC CONSTRAINTS OF COP21 PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 10 November 2016 13:38

 

by Joan Russow PhD

Clobal Compliance Research Project 

 

Thursday, 10 November 2016 12:53

 

ClimateChange
 

At COP 21Ban Ki Moon, in Paris, urged states to negotiate with a global vision not with national vested interests (Cop21 press conference)

A global vision  would be to address article 2 of the UNFCCC and at a minimum to immediately end all subsidies for fossil fuel, to calculate the carbon budget for each state,

to divest in fossil fuels and to reinvest in renewable energy, to conserve sinks -such as old growth forests and bogs, to strengthen conservation of  biodiversity, 

to avoid all false solutions such as nuclear, geo-engineering and biofuels which would all violate principles within the UNFCCC, to compensate for historical  emissions,

and to institute a fair and just transition for workers affected negatively by the new vision.  and to promote nature based solutions  and socially equitable

and environmentally sound such as solar, wind, tidal, and geothermal

 

 
COP22 must avoid the systemic constraints that undermined COP21
 
 
 
SYSTEMIC CONSTRAINTS PREVENTING THE COMMITMENT TO URGENCY
 
IN COP21 IN THE PREAMBLE IS THE “RECOGNITION THAT CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENTS AN URGENT AND POTENTIALLY IRREVERSIBLE THREAT TO HUMAN SOCIETY AND THE PLANET” YET THE EXISTENCE OF SYDTEMIC CONSTRAINTS PREVENTED COP21 FROM EMBODYING THIS RECOGNITION
 
1.THE BEST IS THE ENEMY OF THE GOOD- THE COMPROMISERS CREDO
 
2 BASELINES TARGETS TIMEFRAMES WERE ALL OUT OF SYNC
 
3. -EXPEDIENT OMISSION; GLOBAL CARBON BUDGET. HISTORICAL AND PER CAPITA EMISSIONS
 
4. THE SHORTNESS OF INSTITUTIONAL MEMORY AND THE UNDERMINING OF LEGAL OBLIGATIONS FROM ARTICLE 2 3 AND 4
 
5. A SOLUTION SHOULD NEVER BE EQUALLY BAD OR WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM IT IS INTENDED TO SOLVE
 
6.SOME STATES ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHER
 
 
7. THE LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR; THE  TYRANNY OF CONSENSUS
 
8 THE FAILURE TO REVERSE THE EXEMPTION FOR THE CONTRIBUTION TO GREEMHOUSE GAS EMISSION
 
9. RELUCTANCE TO USE THE INTERNATIONAL COURT AGAINST THE MAJOR EMMITTERS FOR THEY VIOLATIONS OF ARTICLE 2 OF THE UNFCCC
 
10. IGNORING COMMITMMENT FOR FUNDING SOURCE
Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 November 2016 13:23
Read more...
 
Doubts About the Promised Bounty of Genetically Modified Crops PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 30 October 2016 13:06

BY DANNY HAKIM
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/30/business/gmo-promise-falls-short.html?smid=re-share&_r=0OCT. 29, 2016

Arnaud Rousseau, a sixth-generation farmer in France, in a field of rapeseed. Twenty years ago, Europe largely rejected genetic modification at the same time the United States and Canada were embracing it. CreditEd Alcock for The New York TimesLONDON — The controversy over genetically modified crops has long focused on largely unsubstantiated fears that they are unsafe to eat.
But an extensive examination by The New York Times indicates that the debate has missed a more basic problem — genetic modification in the United States and Canada has not accelerated increases in crop yields or led to an overall reduction in the use of chemical pesticides.
The promise of genetic modification was twofold: By making crops immune to the effects of weedkillers and inherently resistant to many pests, they would grow so robustly that they would become indispensable to feeding the world’s growing population, while also requiring fewer applications of sprayed pesticides.
Twenty years ago, Europe largely rejected genetic modification at the same time the United States and Canada were embracing it. Comparing results on the two continents, using independent data as well as academic and industry research, shows how the technology has fallen short of the promise.

Last Updated on Sunday, 30 October 2016 21:37
Read more...
 
Cultivating a Different Future for Rural Women in Argentina PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 15 October 2016 22:48

 

This article is published ahead of the International Day of Rural Women, celebrated October 15

Olga Campos (left), her grandson Jhonny and her sister-in-law Limbania Limache, on the three-hectare leased plot of land where they plant organic vegetables in El Pato, 44 km south of Buenos Aires.In cold, hot or wet weather they work every day in the vegetable garden. Credit: Guido Ignacio Fontán/IPS

 

EL PATO, Argentina, Oct 13 2016 (IPS) - Her seven children have grown up, but she now takes care of a young grandson while working in her organic vegetable garden in El Pato, south of the city of Buenos Aires. Olga Campos wants for them what she wasn’t able to achieve: an education to forge a different future.

I am 40 years old and I am just now going to school,.. something that I never thought I would do. As I was not able to go to school, to me as a mother the most important thing was that my kids got to go,” Campos told IPS in this town of 7,000 people in the municipality of Berazategui, (44 km from the capital of Argentina.)

Last Updated on Monday, 17 October 2016 14:00
Read more...
 
Conservation Congress Votes to Ban All Domestic Trade in Elephant Ivory PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 14 September 2016 06:32

 

HONOLULU, Hawaii, Sep 11 2016 (IPS) - The international conservation community has taken an important step towards saving African elephants from mass slaughter by voting at a major congress to call on all governments to ban their domestic trade in ivory.

A resolution at the World Conservation Congress of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) was passed overwhelmingly by governments and NGOs on its last day on Saturday despite fierce opposition from a minority of countries led by Japan, South Africa and Namibia.

Tusks end up smuggled by criminal organisations to Asia where they are carved and sold openly -- mostly in China, Vietnam and Hong Kong -- under the guise of legal ivory imported before a ban on international trade came into force in 1989.

 

Motion 007 was the last and most contentious of 105 resolutions voted on at the 10-day IUCN congress in Honolulu. Delegates cheered and applauded as some 20 amendments put forward by Namibia and Japan were defeated, and the text of the resolution was approved.

The resolution, sponsored on the government side by the United States and Gabon, aims to deprive illegal poachers of market demand for elephant ivory. Results of a recently released Great Elephant Census of 18 African countries showed that poachers are killing some 27,000 savanna elephants a year, resulting in an annual population decline of 8 percent.

Activists say an elephant is being shot for its ivory every 15 minutes. Tusks end up smuggled by criminal organisations to Asia where they are carved and sold openly — mostly in China, Vietnam and Hong Kong — under the guise of legal ivory imported before a ban on international trade came into force in 1989.

Read more...
 
Politics for the planet: why nature and wildlife need their own seats at the UN June 30, 2016 3.32pm EDT PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 03 July 2016 10:08

alt

Street artwork in Sydney reminds us to think about how much we depend on the planet. Stefanie FishelAuthor provided

 

The Conversation

Academic rigor, journalistic flair

 

https://theconversation.com/politics-for-the-planet-why-nature-and-wildlife-need-their-own-seats-at-the-un-59892

Whether we consider wild weather, unprecedented Arctic melting and global temperatures, or the Great Barrier Reef, the global environment is generating alarming news. Predictions of multi-metre sea level rises, the collapse of marine biodiversity and food chains, and global warming far beyond 2℃ are equally concerning. Is our system of global environmental law and governance adequate to this crisis?

 

Our short answer is “no”, but what should be done? We believe new international institutions and laws are needed, with one fundamental purpose: to give a voice to ecosystems and non-human forms of life.

We say this knowing that the current global system is inadequate to respond to many human crises, but with the conviction that environmental justice often overlaps with social justice.

Read more...
 
Update Message from Captain Paul Watson PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 29 June 2016 10:31
Last year Sea Shepherd shut down the entire illegally operated six ship fleet of Antarctic toothfish poachers.
 
This year Sea Shepherd shut down a six ship Chinese drift net fleet in the Indian Ocean with the STEVE IRWIN and arrested three Chinese trawlers in the waters of Gabon with the BOB BARKER
 
Last month the SAM SIMON crew arrested numerous poachers in the marine reserves of Sicily and earlier this year the MARTIN SHEEN and the FARLEY MOWAT confiscated over 50 illegal gill nets and longlines in the sea of Cortez and assisted in the arrest of totoaba poachers
 
Our efforts to work in cooperation with various governments and with Interpol is getting incredible results.
Read more...
 
Building Africa’s Energy Grid Can Be Green, Smart and Affordable PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 17 June 2016 08:26

By Friday Phiri

A Congolese man transports charcoal on his bicycle outside Lubumbashi in the DRC. An estimated 138 million poor households spend 10 billion dollars annually on energy-related products such as charcoal, candles, kerosene and firewood. Credit: Miriam Mannak/IPS

A Congolese man transports charcoal on his bicycle outside Lubumbashi in the DRC. An estimated 138 million poor households spend 10 billion dollars annually on energy-related products such as charcoal, candles, kerosene and firewood. Credit: Miriam Mannak/IPS

PEMBA, Zambia, Jun 16 2016 (IPS) - It’s just after two p.m. on a sunny Saturday and 51-year-old Moses Kasoka is seated outside the grass-thatched hut which serves both as his kitchen and bedroom.

Physically challenged since birth, Kasoka has but one option for survival—begging. But he thinks life would have been different had he been connected to electricity. “I know what electricity can do, especially for people in my condition,” he says.

Read more...
 
New Protocol Aims to Cut Trillion-Dollar Food Waste Bill PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 09 June 2016 04:01

By Stella Paul| 

Tsering Dorji works on his farm in western Bhutan’s Satsam village. Due to inadequate transportation and marketing opportunities, he loses half of what he produces every rainy season. Credit: Stella Paul/IPS

Tsering Dorji works on his farm in western Bhutan’s Satsam village. Due to inadequate transportation and marketing opportunities, he loses half of what he produces every rainy season. Credit: Stella Paul/IPS

COPENHAGEN, Jun 8 2016 (IPS) - Four years ago, 27-year-old Tsering Dorji of western Bhutan’s Satsam village took to organic vegetable farming. Since then, thanks to composted manure and organic pesticide, the soil health of his farm has improved, and the yield has increased manifold.

Dorji, once a subsistence farmer, now has about 60 bags of surplus food every two months to sell and earn a profit.  But come the rainy season and he still loses thousands of rupees carrying his produce to markets that are miles away.

Last Updated on Thursday, 09 June 2016 04:08
Read more...
 
UN Chief Seeks Fast-Paced Ratifications for Climate Change Treaty PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 20 April 2016 06:21

By Thalif Deen 

“Predictions are that the emission reduction pledges under the Agreement would lead to rise in temperatures beyond 3 degrees celsius, which would be catastrophic for the world,” Meena Raman told IPS. Credit: Manipadma Jena/IPS.

“Predictions are that the emission reduction pledges under the Agreement would lead to rise in temperatures beyond 3 degrees celsius, which would be catastrophic for the world,” Meena Raman told IPS. Credit: Manipadma Jena/IPS.

UNITED NATIONS, Apr 19 2016 (IPS) - Over 150 countries are expected to sign the Paris climate change agreement on April 22 but the historic treaty will not come into force until it has been ratified by 55 countries.

 

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who has hailed the agreement as “a landmark of international cooperation on one of the world’s most complex issues”, is hoping for fast-paced ratifications – perhaps before the end of the year so that it will also be considered as one of his lasting political legacies before he steps down in December.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 April 2016 07:24
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Latest News