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Liberal Convention: Unsolicited Advice for Stephane Dion, the New Liberal Party Leader PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Saturday, 02 December 2006 08:19

2006 December 2

Liberal Convention: Unsolicited Advice for Stephane Dion, the New Liberal Party Leader

PEJ News- Joan Russow PhD, Global Compliance Research Project - At the Convention of the Liberal Party of Canada the Liberals, as usual are talking from the "left " purporting to be progressive. Yet when they are elected they govern from the "right.". The following unsolicited advice comprises a modest proposal to assist the new leader in framing actions to bring to fruition this "progressive vision" if the Liberals were to form the next government.



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Liberal Convention: Unsolicited Advice for Stephane Dion, the New Liberal leader.

The Canadian Liberal Party Convention is overflowing with euphemisms, evoking the party as being ?progressive? with a ?vision? espousing lofty claims. The following objectives will assist the new leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in framing this ?progressive vision?. Stephane Dion should undertake to do the following if the Liberal party forms the next government:

(1) to call for the invocation of Article 22 of the Charter of the United Nations and for a resolution in the UN General Assembly to set up an international tribunal to try Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld et al;

(2) to support the Canadian and German cases against Bush and his regime for violations of the Convention Against Torture;

(3) to lobby for the international Court of Justice to give an advisory opinion on the US policy of ?pre-emptive/preventive aggression?;

(4) to oppose the use of ?human security?, ?humanitarian intervention? and ?responsibility to protect? to justify the invasion and occupation of a sovereign state;

(5) to respect international rule of law, and to accept the jurisdiction and decision of the International Court of Justice;

(6) to discharge obligations incurred through conventions, treaties, and covenants; and to act on commitments made through conference action plans related to Common security - peace, environment, human rights and social justice;

(7) to sign, to ratify, and to enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance with, and respect for Common Security international Conventions, Covenants and Treaties;

(8) to act on commitments made through UN Conference Action Plans, and to fulfill expectations created through General Assembly Resolutions, and Declarations;

(9) to adhere to the Charter of the United Nations and to work to ?prevent the scourge of war?, and to thus resolve not support the US in its misinterpretation and its disregard for the rule of international law;

(10) to discharge obligations under the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Arms treaty by discontinuing the sale of CANDU reactors around the world and to acknowledge that the sale of Canadian nuclear technology has been linked to the development of nuclear arms in India and Pakistan;

(11) to phase out the mining of uranium and to acknowledge Canada?s continued contribution to the development of nuclear weapons; [ ?there is probably a little bit of Canadian uranium in all the US nuclear arsenal? (Fred Knelman, PhD, author of ?America, God and the Bomb?]:

(12) to link civil nuclear energy with the development of nuclear arms
[Canada selling uranium to the US-probably a little bit of uranium in every one of the US nuclear bombs):

(13) to condemn the failure on the part of the nuclear weapon states including the permanent members of the UN Security Council to eliminate weapons of mass destruction such as nuclear, chemical, and biological, in defiance of the global commitment made at Stockholm in 1972 to eliminate the production of weapons of mass destruction;

(14) to condemn the US for withdrawing from the ABT treaty and the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty, and for failing, as a nuclear arms power, to reduce nuclear weapons as agreed under Article VI but also has resumed development of nuclear weapons (Article VI: commits all parties to pursue negotiations in good faith on measures to end the nuclear arms race and to achieve disarmament.);

(15) to support the disbanding of NATO and to openly criticize NATO'S first strike nuclear policy, and NATO?s undermining to the United Nations and international law, and NATO?s contribution to global insecurity;


(16) to condemn the use of weapons such as Depleted Uranium and cluster bombs that would be prohibited under the Geneva Protocol II

Prohibiting or restricting use of certain conventional weapons which may be deemed to be excessively injurious or to have indiscriminate effects
Recalling with satisfaction the adoption, on 10 October 1980, of the
Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons Which May Be Deemed to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects;

(17) to prevent the circulating and berthing of US nuclear powered or nuclear arms capable vessels;

(18) to discontinue the production of arms, and to phase out the Canadian arms industries while establishing a fair job transition program; )

(19) to promote disarmament, and to condemn the continued profiting from the sale of arms;

(20) to oppose ballistic missile defence and to recognize that ballistic missile defence contravenes obligations under the Outer Space treaty, and risks resumption of arms race, and weaponization of space;

In 1967, the Outer space Treaty came into force. Under this treaty states, including the US, incurred the following obligations;

The exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind humanity....(Art. 1 Outer Space Treaty of 1967 in force 1967) ;

...the moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military maneuvers on celestial bodies shall be forbidden... (Art. IV Outer Space Treaty of 1967 in force 1967;

(21) to condemn the longstanding US practice of engaging in covert and overt "Operations" against independent states; from "Operation Zapata", and "Operation Northwoods" against Cuba, through "Operation Condor" in Chile, through years of euphemistic operations such as "Operation Just Cause" against Panama and more recently "Operation enduring freedom" against Afghanistan, and "Operation Iraqi Freedom" against Iraq;

(22) to advocate that the term ?American? will apply to all citizens of North, Central and South America, and that henceforth the term ?USers? will apply to citizens of the United States. [This change is proposed in honour of the Nicaragua revolutionary, Augusto Sandino, who in the 1920s countered the US President?s claim that all of America was for the Americans with ?all Latin America is for the Latin Americans?. [To advance the proposal that if the US has co-opted the calendaric day of ?9 11?, India should be able to have ?12 4? to remember Bhobal]

(23) to condemn the US propping up and financing of military dictators that further vested national interests and to condemn the longstanding US practice of assassinating or facilitating the assassination of state leaders who interfere with US interests or who are deemed to be a potential threat;

(24) to oppose the continued installation by the US of over 750 military bases in sovereign states around the world and to oppose the promulgation of propaganda for war in violation of the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights;

(25) to abide by the provisions in the Convention on the Right to Correction which affirmed:
",,, to protect mankind [humanity] from the scourge of war, to prevent the recurrence of aggression from any source, and to combat all propaganda which is ether designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression;

(26) to oppose the notion of ?human security" which has been extended to incorporate "humanitarian intervention" and the "Responsibility to protect?, all of which have become a licence to increase military expenditures and to legitimize military intervention;

(27) to comply with Geneva Conventions on the treatment of civilians, and to abide by both international human rights and humanitarian law

(28) to condemn the causing works or installations to release dangerous forces [substances and activities] that could impact on civilians:
?Works or installations containing dangerous forces, namely dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations, shall not be made the object of attack, even where these objects are military objectives, if such attack may cause the release of dangerous forces and consequent severe losses among the civilian population. Other military objectives located at or in the vicinity of these works or installations shall not be made the object of attack if such attack may cause the release of dangerous forces from the works or installations and consequent sever losses among the civilian population. (Art. LVI.1 Bern [Geneva] Protocol II of 1977 on the Protection of Victims of Non-international Armed Conflicts in Force 1978)?;

(29) To condemn the starvation of civilians that has occurred through attacking objects indispensable to the survival of civilian population
?Starvation of civilians as a method of combat is prohibited. It is therefore prohibited to attack, destroy, remove or render useless, for that purpose, objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, such as foodstuffs, agricultural areas for the production of foodstuffs, crops, livestock, drinking water installations and supplies and irrigation works. (Art. XIV Bern [Geneva] Protocol II of 1977 on the Protection of Victims of Non-international Armed Conflicts in force 1978)?;

(30) to condemn the US violation of the Convention against Torture; the violations have occurred through Cruel, Inhumane or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, through counseling other parties to engage in torture, through being a party to the offence of torture, and through counseling another person to be a party to the offence of torture in Guantanamo Bay prison, and in Abu Ghraib prison; and to condemn the US for acts of rendition

(31) to criticize states that engage in cruel and inhumane punishment such as through the practice of capital punishment, in violation of accepted international norms:

(32) to oppose the continued violation of the Geneva Protocols including the planting of land mines throughout the world, and condemn states that failed to sign and ratify the Convention for the Banning of Land mines;

in disregard of the 1981 Convention on Prohibition or restriction on the Use of Mines, Booby Traps and other devices; including those prohibited that are deemed ?to Be Excessively Injurious or to Have Indiscriminate Effects, particularly the Protocol on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Mines, Booby Traps and Other Devices (Protocol II);

(34) to call for compliance with the five Geneva Protocols: Protocol on Non-Detectable Fragments (Protocol I), the Protocol on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Mines, Booby Traps and Other Devices (Protocol II) and the Protocol on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Incendiary Weapons (Protocol III) (United Nations Resolution, 38/71, 1993) and the responsibility of states to clear up previous implemented weapon systems (Protocol V) ;

(33) to resolve to embark upon a ?socially equitable and environmentally sound? investment campaign which supports the adherence to principles, and promotes prevention technology?doing it right the first time, and does not invest in any company that does not comply with the principles in all aspects of its operation:

(35) to work for the immediate withdrawal of all Canadian troops in Afghanistan;

(36) to oppose justice being perceived in terms of revenge through military intervention rather than through seeking justice from the International Court of Justice

The fundamental purpose of the Charter of the United Nations is to prevent the scourge of war. Chapter VI --peaceful resolution of disputes of the Charter, provides the means to prevent war, including the application of article 27-the requirement for parties to a conflict to abstain from the vote, and the requirement under article 37 to take potential situations of conflict to the International Court of Justice;

(37) to criticize the way the US misconstrued article 51 ? self defence- of UN charter to t justify premeditated military aggression through the illegal act of invading Afghanistan;

In 2001, NATO States disregarded the Charter of the United Nations when they accepted the US misinterpretation of Article 51- self defence clause- as justification for the US act of revenge against Afghanistan;

(38) to recognize that the NATO Mission (ISAF) in Afghanistan Violates UN Charter by Failing to Fulfill UN Conditions
UN Security Council gave conditional support for the NATO?s International Security Force. This force was sanctioned in UN Security Council resolutions only if the force's actions were ?in keeping with the Charter of the United Nations. Under UN Charter, one of the purposes of the United Nations is the following:

"To establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained,...?

The NATO states has been found to have violated the Convention against Torture and they have yet to be assessed on their violation of Geneva Protocols on banned weapons systems such as Depleted uranium, and on their violation of international environmental instruments;

(39) to acknowledge that the NATO ISAF force Ignores a Fundamental International Principle

Since 2001, most of the NATO countries have been belligerents in Afghanistan. The current "mission" described as a 3D - defense, development, and diplomacy- mission violates a fundamental international principle that a belligerent state should never be involved on the ground in reconstruction. NATO states are supporting a 3 B campaign: BOMB, BRUTE, and BRIBE OPERATION. Bombing a village, blasting in doors, brutally killing and wounding citizens and ignoring culture and then bribing with funds for reconstruction of hospitals to heal the victims are beyond any claims of legitimacy.

The principle of dissociation between militarism and development is stressed in the 1986 Declaration of the Right to Development:

In the Preamble to the Declaration states reaffirmed:
That there is a close relationship between disarmament and development and that progress in the field of disarmament would considerably promote progress in the field of development and that resources released through disarmament measures should be devoted to the economic and social development and well-being of all peoples and in particular , those of the developing countries. (Preamble, Declaration of the Right to Development)

(40) to criticize NATO?s Using Machiavellian ?Hearts and Minds? Strategy
NATO supports the longstanding Vietnam strategy of attempting to win hearts and minds in order to obtain ?intelligence?. Although there are irreversible environmental, social, and human rights consequences of the invasion and occupation of Afghanistan, the only immediate recourse is for NATO to withdraw immediately, and be required to pay full compensation for damage and destruction of their invasion and occupation of Afghanistan;

(41) to oppose NATO?s Undermining Sovereignty and Democracy of Member States of NATO
At the recent Quebec meeting of NATO. there was a resolution passed by the Defence Committee that ??in reference to Afghanistan Caveats must be removed?. The member states of NATO had previously voted in their respective assemblies and parliaments ?caveats? which would limit the state?s participation in Afghanistan. The parliamentary Committee qualified the call for removal of caveats by passing a resolution calling for the removal of caveats that would interfere with the operation (a paraphrase of the resolution). NATO is contemplating pressuring the member states to remove the caveats that were voted on through the democratic process, and in doing so is proclaiming that NATO is above the sovereignty and democratic processes of member states.

(42) to prevent war by condemning the policy of pre-emptive/preventive attack against sovereign states, the practice of designating states as being on ?the axis of evil?, the illegal act of invading Iraq:
The fundamental purpose of the Charter of the United Nations is to prevent the scourge of war. Chapter VI of the Charter, provides the means to prevent war, including the application of article 27-the requirement for parties to a conflict to abstain from the vote, and the requirement under article 37 to take potential situations of conflict to the International Court of Justice;

(43) to act on international commitments in conference action plans and to fulfill expectations created though UN General Assembly resolutions. to reduce the military budget and transfer the savings into social programs

In 1976 at Habitat 1, member states of the United Nations affirmed the following in relation to the military budget:

"The waste and misuse of resources in war and armaments should be prevented. All countries should make a firm commitment to promote general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control, in particular in the field of nuclear disarmament. Part of the resources thus released should be utilized so as to achieve a better quality of life for humanity and particularly the peoples of developing countries" (II, 12 Habitat 1).

In 1981, in the General Assembly resolution entitled Resolution on the reduction of the military budget, the member states
(i) reaffirmed "the urgent need to reduce the military budget, and agreed to freeze and reduce the military budget";
(ii) recognised that "the military budget constitutes a heavy burden for the economies of all nations, and has extremely harmful consequences on international peace and security";
(iii) reiterated the appeal "to all States, in particular the most heavily armed States, pending the conclusion of agreements on the reduction of military expenditures, to exercise self-restraint in their military expenditures with a view to reallocating the funds thus saved to economic and social development, particularly for the benefit of developing countries" (Resolution on the Reduction of Military budgets, 1981).

These appeals were further reinforced in a 1983 General Assembly Resolution on the Relationship between Disarmament and Development, that curbing the arms build-up would make it possible to release additional resources for use in economic and social development, particularly for the benefit of the developing countries." Also in the 1993 resolution, member states considered that "the magnitude of military expenditures is now such that their various implications can no longer be ignored in the efforts pursued in the international community to secure the recovery of the world economy and the establishment of a new international economic order."

Also in 1992, all member states recognized that "Warfare is inherently destructive of sustainable development" ( Rio Declarations. Principle 24, UNCED, 1992), and in Chapter 33, of Agenda 21, member states of the Untied Nations made a commitment to the "the reallocation of resources presently committed to military purposes" (33.18e)

In 1994, in adopting the statement from the International Conference on Population and Development, the member states of the United Nations concurred that the attainment of ?quantitative and qualitative goals of the present Programme of Action clearly require additional resources, some of which could become available from a reordering of priorities at the individual, national and international levels. However, none of the actions required?nor all of them combined? is expensive in the context of either current global development or military expenditures." (Article 1.19)
In the 1984 General Assembly Resolution entitled the Right of Peoples to Peace, there were "Appeals to all States and international organizations to do their utmost to assist in implementing the right of peoples to peace through the adoption of ...measures at both the national and the international level." (4. Declaration on the Right of Peoples to Peace approved by General Assembly resolution 39/11 of 12 November 1984)

Currently the Global Community spends more than 1 trillion dollars on the military budget at a time when many basic and fundamental rights have not been fulfilled: the right to affordable and safe housing; the right to unadulterated food (pesticide-free and genetically engineered-free food); the right to safe drinking water; the right to a safe environment; the right to universally accessible, not for profit health care; and the right to free and accessible education;

(44) to repeal the Anti-terrorism Act which violates international law, including the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights, and the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination

(45) to end racial profiling which violates the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination;

(46) to end the targeting and intimidating of activists resulting in discrimination on the grounds of ?political and other opinion? - a listed ground in the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights;

(47) to end the practice of CSIS targeting citizens engaged in lawful advocacy and dissent- a practice prohibited under the CSIS Act;

(48) to fully implement the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights

(49) to fully discharge obligations under the International Covenant of Social, Economic and Cultural Rights by ensuring citizens right to housing, right to food, and the right to education

(50) to call for the signing and ratifying of the Convention on the Rights of Migrant workers and their Families, and to ensure the enactment of statutory legislation necessary to ensure compliance;

(51) to no longer undermine Convention on the Rights of Indigenous peoples, and work towards strengthening the Convention; and to abide by No 169 Convention:
?Indigenous and tribal peoples shall enjoy the full measure of human rights and fundamental freedoms without hindrance or discrimination. The provisions of the Convention shall be applied without discrimination to male and female members of these peoples.?(Art. 3 Convention Concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries No. 169, 1990)

(52) to prevent discrimination on the following grounds:
- race, tribe, or culture;
- colour, ethnicity, national ethnic or social origin, or language; nationality, place of birth, or nature of residence (refugee or immigrant, migrant worker);
- gender, sex, sexual orientation, same sex marriage, gender identity, marital status, or form of family,
- disability or age;
- religion or conviction, political or other opinion, or - class, economic position, or other status;

(53) to respect labour rights including the right to strike, the right to equal pay for work of equal value, the right to safe working conditions; and to ensure compliance with all International Labour Organization Conventions

(54) to institute a fair and just transition program for workers in industries that have been phased out because the industries are deemed to be harmful to human health and the environment;

(55) to ensure women's reproductive rights and choice is in compliance with commitments made under the International Conference on Population and Development;
to comply fully with the commitments in the Beijing Platform of Action, with obligations under the Convention for the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, to support the Charter challenge to the first past the post electoral system, and the goal of 50/50 with equal representation of women in Parliament and in the legislatures. In addition, to fully fund a national day care program.

(56) to ensure that fundamental rights are not denied by the imposition of religious beliefs, and religious extremism;

(57) to discharge obligations under the Convention on Biological Diversity, and thus to identify biodiversity, conserve biodiversity, and implement the precautionary principle to prevent the loss or reduction of biodiversity,

(58) to protect Endangered species;

(59) to ban introduction of off site species;

(60) to prohibit salmon aquaculture;

(61) to eliminate the threat to biodiversity and to ban ecologically unsound practices;

(62) to restructure the current environmental assessment review process so that it becomes a legitimate environmental assessment and less a project review mechanism;

(63) to discharge obligations under the Framework Convention on Climate Change by accepting the conclusion of the Intergovernmental panel, by abiding by the precautionary principle, by conserving carbon sinks, and by reducing greenhouse gas emissions;

(64) to act on the commitment in Agenda 21, UNCED, to redirect subsidies from the fossil fuel and nuclear industries to socially equitable and environmentally sound energy;

(65) to discharge obligations under comply the Convention on the Elimination of the Production and Consumption of Ozone-depleting substances by phasing out the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances;

(66) to enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance with the Law of the Seas;

(67) to act on the commitment from the Rio Declaration to prevent the transfer to other states of substances or activities that are harmful to human health or the environment;

(68) to implement the commitment made at the United Nations conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) 1992, to promote a "culture of safety" by preventing disasters, and to enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance with the Convention for the Prevention of Disasters?:

(70) to ensure adequate regulatory and other measures to avoid the occurrence of disasters..." agreed to at Habitat II, 1996

(71) to work to eliminate environmentally induced diseases and poverty related health problems and to ensure universal access, to publicly funded not for profit health care system;

(72) to phase out the production of toxic, hazardous, atomic waste, and subsidize environmentally benign substitutes

(73) to reaffirm the importance of precautionary principle which reads where there is a threat to the environment lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing measures that would prevent the threat

(74) to prevent the transfer to other states of substances and activities that are harmful to human health or the environment as agreed at the UN Conferences on the Environment and Development, 1992;

(75) to ban genetically engineered foods and crops which have led to a deterioration of the food supply, and heritage seeds;

(76) to act upon a commitment in recent UN Conferences to move away from the overconsumptive model of development, to reduce the ecological footprint and to reject the notion that economic growth will solve the urgency of the global situation;

(77) to move away from using the Gross Domestic Product as a means of determining economic health to using Genuine Progress Indicators or the Criteria of Public Trust;

(78) to redirect budget allocations away from socially inequitable and environmentally unsound practices to socially equitable and environmentally sound practices;

(79) to act on the commitment made at the UN conference on Women and the Habitat II conference to ensure that corporations including transnationals comply with international law including international environmental law;

(80) to revoke charters of corporations that violate human rights, cause environmental degradation, deny social justice and labour rights or contribute to conflict or war (Taking care of Business Campaign launched by Richard Grossman)

(81) to prevent agribusiness and pharmaceutical companies, along with other corporations involved with biotechnology, and with environmentally unsound practices from sponsoring and influencing the direction of research at University;

(82) to support the efforts of organic and ecological agriculture associations in establishing organic/ecological farm practice codes, standards and certification processes;

(83) to ban genetically engineered foods and crops and to institute a fair and just transition program for farmers and communities affected by the ban;

(84) to phase out Agriculture Canada and other federal research support for large-scale agribusiness chemical, pesticide and genetic and other bioengineering practices and refocus support on the development of family and community scale ecological agriculture models, principles and practices such as biological soil and pest management approaches like soil rebuilding crop rotations, companion planting, intercropping, and perennial polycultures;

(85) to phase-out federal support for college and agency agribusiness educational programmes and refocus supports on family farm and community scale eco-agriculture workshops, distance education, undergraduate and graduate and diploma;

(86) to oppose the promotion of globalization, deregulation and privatization through trade agreements, such as the WTO/FTAA/NAFTA/CAFTA etc that undermine the rule of international public trust law, and to condemn the practice of corporations benefiting and profiting from war; [to call for the dismantling of the WTO, and for the abrogation os NAFTA/FTAA/CAFTA other similar vested interest economic agreements that undermine Public Trust international Law. In addition to ensure that principle and rule drive corporations rather than being overruled by corporations;

(87) to oppose the Trade, Investment and Labour Mobility Agreement (TILMA) which would undermine provincial and municipal regulations;

(88) to recognize the failures of IMF structural adjustment programs SAPS), which have exploited vulnerable and indigenous peoples around the world;

(89) to oppose the notion of ?public private partnerships? which have resulted in the privatization of public services such as water, and health care;

(90) to oppose the reduction of federal funding for universities; this reduction has given rise to corporate funding of education and corporate direction of research; and has resulted in academics groveling for funds;

(91) to end the subsidizing and investing in companies that have developed weapons of mass destruction, that have violated human rights, that have denied social justice, that have exploited workers, that have destroyed the environment;

(92) to institute Mandatory International Ethical Normative (MIEN) standards and enforceable regulations to drive industry to conform to international law, and to oppose corporate "voluntary compliance";

(93) to act on an international commitment to transfer .7% of the GDP for overseas aid, and to contribute to the canceling of third world debt;

(95) to further global common security

(96) to recognize that true security- is not "human security" which has been extended to "humanitarian intervention" and used along with the "responsibility to protect" notion to justify military intervention in other states. True security is not ?military security? but common security and involves the following objectives:

? to promote and fully guarantee respect for human rights including labour rights, civil and political rights, social and cultural rights- right to food, right to housing, right to universally accessible not for profit health care system , right to education and social justice;
? to enable socially equitable and environmentally sound employment, and ensure the right to development;
? to achieve a state of peace, social justice and disarmament; through reallocation of military expenses
? to create a global structure that respects the rule of law ; and
? to ensure the preservation and protection of the environment, respect the inherent worth of nature beyond human purpose reduce the ecological footprint and move away from the current model of overconsumptive development.

(97) to condemn the intimidating or offering of economic incentives in exchange for support for military intervention; (the US continually cajoles, intimidates, and bribes other members of the United Nations);

(98) to accept that if the Security Council, because of lack of unanimity of the permanent members, fails to exercise its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security in any case where there appears to be a threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression, the General Assembly shall consider the matter immediately with a view to making appropriate recommendations to Members for collective measures, including in the case of a breach of the peace or act of ? to maintain or restore international peace and security. If not in session at the time, the General Assembly may meet in emergency special session within twenty-four hours of the request therefore. Such emergency special session shall be called if requested by the Security Council on the vote of any seven members, or by a majority of the Members of the United Nations; (1951, Uniting for peace resolution);

(99) to recognize that the UN Security Council violates the fundamental principle of the sovereign equality enshrined in the Charter of United Nations;

(100) to call for the removal of Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, and the strengthening of Chapter VI (peaceful resolutions of disputes) and of the role of the UN General Assembly;

For years, through conventions, treaties and covenants, through Conference Action plans, and through UN General Assembly resolutions, member states of the United Nations have incurred obligations, made commitments and created expectations related to the furtherance of Common Security.

The Liberal party leader can stand in support of global common security or be coerced into supporting the US in its long standing and accelerating contribution to global militarism and global insecurity. Common security can only be achieved if there is a concerted international effort to eliminated the complexity and interdependence of the actions that have led to global insecurity.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 July 2015 17:05
 

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