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APEC GOVERNMENT NEGOTIATORS DANGLING BY CORPORATE STRINGS PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow
Wednesday, 27 April 2016 12:07

From pejnews archives

 

June 23 1997
APEC GOVERNMENT NEGOTIATORS DANGLING BY CORPORATE STRINGS
 
By Joan Russow 
 
Victoria Monday June 23, 1997 Ñ "no organization such as OECD or APEC and no trade agreement including GATT, NAFTA, WTO  should undermine any state resolve to raise standards and strengthen regulations.  MEmber states of the United Naitons must urge the OECD countries to discontinue all further negotiations on MAI (the Multilateral Agreement on Investment) whose 'standards of investment' undermine principles derived from member states obligations, expectations and commitments through international law."
 
"The meeting of APEC transport representatives in Victoria is one more attempt to devolve power and responsibility to corportations," 
For fifty -two years through international agreements, the member states of the United Nations have undertaken: 
 
(i) to promote and fully guarantee respect for human rights; 
(ii) to ensure the preservation and protection of the environment; 
(iii) to create a global structure that respects the rule of law; 
(iv) to achieve a state of peace; justice and security , and 
(v) to enable socially equitable and environmentally sound development. 
 
International agreements include both obligations incurred through the United Nations Charter, the United Nations Conventions, Treaties, and Covenants; expectations created through the United Nations Declarations, and General Assembly Resolutions; and commitments made through UN Conference Action Plans. 
 
For years governments like the US government have negotiated international agreements and neither signed or ratified these agreements, or like the Canadian government sign and ratify agreements but not enact the necessary domestic egislation to ensure compliance and enforcement. 
 
Rather than undermine international standards and regulations,  through a corporate-drive process, the member states of the United Nations must  sign and ratify international agreements that they  have not yet signed and ratified, and enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance and enforcement. In addition governments must undertake to fulfill expectations created through General Assembly resolutions and declarations, and to act upon commitments arising from conference action plans. 
 
Rather than continuing to devolve power and responsibility to the coproate sector for "voluntary compliance", governments must reaffirm 
and act on  the undertaking in the Platform of Action in the UN Conference on Women: (Beijing, China) and in the Habitat II Agenda  (Istanbul, Turkey) to ensure that corporations including transnationals comply with national codes, social security laws, international laws, including international environmental law
 
"Gorvernments of all the member states of the United Nations must establish mandatory international normative standards/regulations (MINS) drawn from international principles and from the highest and strongest regulations from member states harmonized continually upwards"  says Russow. To ensure compliance governments must be prepared to revoke licences and charters of corporations including transnationals if the corporations have violated human rights, caused environmental degradation, or contributed to conflict and war." continued Russow.  
 
 
Further, we undertake to establish an International Court of Compliance where citizens can take evidence of state and corporate non-compliance. 
 
 
If these years of obligations had been discharged, if these fifty years of expectations had been fulfilled, and if years of commitments had been acted upon, respect for human rights could have been guaranteed, preservation and protection of the environment could have been ensured, threats to peace prevented and removed, disarmament achieved, and socially equitable and environmentally sound development could have been enabled.
 
 
In June 1997, the Earth Summit II meeting of government leaders will take place in New York. At this meeting they will be endorsing a document related to the follow-up to the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development (UNCED), 
 
 
he Earth Summit II is important primarily for citizens to reveal that years of obligations incurred through the Charter of the United Nations, conventions, treaties and covenants; of expectations created through General Assembly resolutions, and of commitments made through conference action plans have not been undertaken, and that most of the obligations, expectations and commitments have neither been discharged, fulfilled, nor acted upon, and that it is time for compliance through action. 
 
Gorvernments of all the member states of the United Nations must establish mandatory international normative standards/regulations (MINS) drawn from international principles and from the highest and strongest regulations from member states harmonized continually upwards, and ensure that 
Taylor Hladik
 

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