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SDG Goal 5 – Time to implement the Beijing Platform of Action PDF Print E-mail
Justice News
Posted by Joan Russow
Thursday, 20 August 2015 17:06

By Joan Russow Global Compliance Research Project

 

SDG GOAL 5: ACHIEVE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER ALL WOMEN AND GIRLS;

 

 

EVALUATION OF STATE PERFORMANCE ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLATFORM OF ACTION

October  1995 including  addressing 'militarism 

 

 

A. COVENANT OF IMPLEMENTION

B. aDDRESSING MILITARISM

A.COVENANT OF IMPLEMENTATION

 

 

 

 In 1995 all member states of the United Nations adopted the Beijing Platform ocf Action

 

After the Conference  in Beijing, I was concerned  about the failure of governments to implement the Platform of Action so I went through the document and made a scroll, the Covenant of Implementation, of   all the references to implementing the platform.  The following is the Covenant of  Implementation . At a minimum SDG Goal 5 should call for the implementation of  the commitments from Beijing

 

 

9.   Ensure the full implementation of the human rights of women and of the girl child as an inalienable, integral and indivisible part of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; 

 

11.  Achieve the full and effective implementation of the Nairob Forward-looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women;

 

19.  It is essential to design, implement and monitor, with the full participation of women, effective, efficient and mutually reinforcing gender-sensitive policies and programmes, including development policies and programmes, at all levels that will

 foster the empowerment and advancement of women;

 

20.  The participation and contribution of all actors of civil society  particularly women's groups and networks and other non- governmental organizations and community-based organizations, with full respect for their autonomy, in cooperation with    Governments, are important to the effective implementation and follow-up of the Platform for Action;

 

 

21.  The implementation of the Platform for Action requires commitment from Governments and the international community.  By making national and international commitments for action, including those made at the Conference, Governments and the international community recognize the need to take priority action for the empowerment and advancement of women.

 

 

38.  We hereby adopt and commit ourselves as Governments to implement the following Platform for Action,ensuring that a gender perspective is reflected in all our policies and programmes.  We urge the United Nations system, regional and international financial institutions, other relevant regional and international institutions and all women and men, as well as non-governmental organizations, with full respect for their autonomy, and all sectors of civil society, in cooperation with Governments, to fully commit themselves and contribute to the implementation of this Platform for Action.

 

 

FROM THE PLATFORM OF ACTION

1.   The Platform for Action is an agenda for women's empowerment.  Itaims at accelerating the implementation of the Nairobi Forward-lookingStrategies for the Advancement of Women 1/ and at removing all the obstacles to women's active participation in all spheres of public and private life through a full and equal share in economic, social, cultural and political decision-making.  This means that the principle of shared power and responsibility should be established between women and men at home, in the workplace and in the wider national and international communities.  Equality between women and men is a matter of human rights and a condition for social justice and is also a necessary and fundamental prerequisite for equality, development and peace.  A transformed partnership based on equality between women and men is a condition for people-centred sustainable development.  A sustained and long-term commitment is essential, so that women and men can work together for themselves, for their children and for society to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.

 

9.   The objective of the Platform for Action, which is in full conformity with the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations and international law, is the empowerment of all women.  The full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms of all women is essential for the empowerment of women.  While the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural and religious backgrounds must be borne in mind, it is the duty of States, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems, to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms.  The implementation of this Platform, including through national laws and the formulation of strategies, policies, programmes and development priorities, is the sovereign responsibility of each State,in conformity with all human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the significance of and full respect for various religious and ethical values, cultural backgrounds and philosophical convictions of individuals and their communities should contribute to the full enjoyment by women of their human rights in order to achieve equality, development and peace.

 

 

45.  A review of progress since the Nairobi Conference highlights special concerns - areas of particular urgency that stand out as priorities for action. All actors should focus action and resources on the strategic objectives relating to the critical areas of concern which are, necessarily, interrelated, interdependent and of high priority. There is a need for these actors to develop and implement mechanisms of accountability for all the areas of concern.

 

59.  The success of policies and measures aimed at supporting or strengthening the promotion of gender equality and the improvement of the status of women should be based on the integration of the gender perspective in general policies relating to all spheres of society as well as the implementation of positive measures with adequate institutional and financial support at all levels.

 

 

60. (c) Pursue and implement sound and stable macroeconomic and sectoral policies that are designed and monitored with the full and equal participation of  women, encourage broad-based  sustained economic growth, address the structural causes of  poverty and are geared towards eradicating poverty and  reducing gender-based inequality within the overall framework  of achieving people-centred sustainable development;

 

60 (j) Formulate and implement, when necessary, specific economic,  social, agricultural and related policies in support of  female-headed households; 

 

60 (k) Develop and implement anti-poverty programmes, including  employment schemes, that improve access to food for women  living in poverty, including through the use of appropriate  pricing and distribution  mechanisms;

 

 

60 (p) Formulate and implement policies and programmes that enhance  the access of women agricultural and fisheries producers  (including subsistence farmers and producers, especially in  rural areas) to financial, technical, extension and marketing  services; provide access to and control of land, appropriate  infrastructure and technology in order to increase women's  incomes and promote household food security, especially in  rural areas and, where appropriate, encourage the development  of producer-owned, market-based cooperatives;

 

61 (b) Strengthen analytical capacity in order to more systematically  strengthen gender perspectives and integrate them into the  design and implementation of lending programmes, including  structural adjustment and economic recovery programmes;

 

 

61 (c) Find effective development-oriented and durable solutions to  external debt problems in order to help them to finance  programmes and projects targeted at development, including the  advancement of women, inter alia, through the immediate  implementation of the terms of debt forgiveness agreed upon in  the Paris Club in December 1994, which encompassed debt  reduction, including cancellation or other debt relief  measures and develop techniques of debt conversion applied to  social development programmes and projects in conformity with  Platform priorities;

 

62(b) Engage in lobbying and establish monitoring mechanisms, as  appropriate, and other relevant activities to ensure  implementation of the recommendations on poverty eradication  outlined in the Platform for Action and aimed at ensuring  accountability and transparency from the State and private  sectors;

 

84.  By Governments, in cooperation with employers, workers and trade unions, international and non-governmental organizations, including women's and youth organizations, and educational institutions:   (a) Develop and implement education, training and retraining  policies for women, especially young women and women re-  entering the labour market, to provide skills to meet the  needs of a changing socio-economic context for improving their  employment opportunities;

 

 

Strategic objective B.5.   Allocate sufficient resources for and monitor the implementation of educational reforms

 

 

86. (a) Provide the required budgetary resources to the educational  sector, with reallocation within the educational sector to  ensure increased funds for basic education, as appropriate;

 

 86 (b) Establish a mechanism at appropriate levels to monitor the  implementation of educational reforms and measures in relevant  ministries, and establish technical assistance programmes, as  appropriate, to address issues raised by the monitoring  efforts.

 

 

89(a) Contribute to the evaluation of progress achieved, using  educational indicators generated by national, regional and  international bodies, and urge Governments,in implementing  measures, to eliminate  differences between women and men,  boys and girls with regard to opportunities in education and  training and the levels achieved in all fields, particularly  in primary and literacy programmes;

 

Strategic objective C.1.  Increase women's access throughout the  life cycle to appropriate, affordable and quality health care, information and related services

Actions to be taken

 

107. By Governments, in collaboration with non- governmental organizations and employers' and workers' organizations and with the support of international institutions:

 

107 (a) Support and implement the commitments made in the Programme of  Action of the International Conference on Population and  Development, as established in the report of that Conference  and the Copenhagen Declaration on Social Development and  Programme of Action of the World Summit for Social  Development 14/ and the obligations of States parties under  the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of  Discrimination against Women and other relevant international  agreements, to meet the health needs of girls and women of all  ages;

 

107 (c) Design and implement, in cooperation with women and  community-based organizations, gender-sensitive health  programmes, including decentralized health services, that  address the needs of women throughout their lives and take  into account their multiple roles and responsibilities, the  demands on their time, the special needs of rural women and  women with disabilities and the diversity of women's needs  arising from age and socio-economic and cultural differences,  among others; include women, especially local and indigenous  women, in the identification and planning of health-care  priorities andprogrammes; and remove all barriers to women's  health services and provide a broad range of health-care  services;

 

 

107 (g) Ensure that all health services and workers conform to human  rights and to ethical, professional and gender-sensitive  standards in the delivery of women's health services aimed at  ensuring responsible, voluntary and informed consent.  Encourage the development, implementation and dissemination of  codes of ethics guided by existing international  codes of  medical ethics as well as ethical principles that govern other  health professionals;

 

107 (r) Promote public information on the benefits of breast-feeding;  examine ways and means of implementing fully the WHO/UNICEF  International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes,  and enable  mothers to breast-feed their infants by providing  legal, economic, practical and emotional support;

 

107 (s) Establish mechanisms to support and involve non- governmental  organizations, particularly women's organizations,  professional groups and other bodies working to improve the  health of girls and women, in government policy-making,  programme design, as appropriate, and implementation within  the health sector and related sectors at all levels;

 

 

107 (w) Promote and ensure household and national food security, as  appropriate, and implement programmes aimed at improving the  nutritional status of all girls and women by implementing the  commitments made in the Plan of Action on Nutrition of the  International Conference on Nutrition, 16/ including a  reduction world wide of severe and moderate malnutrition among  children under the age of five by one half of 1990 levels by  the year 2000, giving special attention to the gender gap in  nutrition, and a reduction in iron deficiency anaemia in girls  and women by one third of the 1990 levels by the year 2000;

 

 

108 (g) Recognize the specific needs of adolescents and implement  specific appropriate programmes, such as education and  information on sexual and reproductive health issues and on  sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS, taking into  account the rights of the child and the responsibilities,  rights and duties of parents as stated in paragraph 108 (e);

 

 

108 (l) Devise and implement comprehensive and coherent programmes for  the prevention, diagnosis and  treatment of osteoporosis, a  condition that predominantly affects women;

 

108 (n) Reduce environmental hazards that pose a growing threat to  health, especially in poor regions and communities; apply a  precautionary approach, as agreed to in the Rio Declaration on  Environment and Development, adopted by the United Nations  Conference on Environment and Development, 17/ and include  reporting on women's health risks related to the environment  in monitoring the implementation of Agenda 21;

 

109. By Governments, international bodies including relevant United Nations organizations, bilateral and multilateral donors and

non-governmental organizations:

 

109 (a) Ensure the involvement of women, especially those infected  with HIV/AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases or  affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, in all decision-making  relating to the development,  implementation, monitoring and  evaluation of policies and programmes on HIV/AIDS and other  sexually transmitted diseases;

 

109 (b) Review and amend laws and combat practices, as appropriate,  that may contribute to women's susceptibility to HIV infection  and other sexually transmitted diseases, including enacting  legislation against those socio-cultural practices that  contribute to it, and implement legislation, policies and  practices to protect women, adolescents and young girls from  discrimination related to HIV/AIDS;

 

109(j) Assist women and their formal and informal organizations to  establish and expand effective peer education and outreach  programmes and to participate in the design, implementation  and monitoring of these programmes;

 

 

111(d) Develop goals and time-frames, where appropriate, for  improving women's health and for planning, implementing,  monitoring and evaluating programmes, based on gender-impact  assessments using qualitative and quantitative data  disaggregated by sex, age, other established demographic  criteria and socio- economic variables;

 

 

111 (e) Establish, as appropriate, ministerial and interministerial  mechanisms for monitoringthe  implementation of women's  health policy and programme reforms and establish, as  appropriate, high-level focal points in national planning  authorities responsible for monitoring to ensure that women's  health concerns are mainstreamed in all relevant government

 agencies and programmes.

 

112 (c) Give higher priority to women's health and develop mechanisms  for coordinating and implementing the health objectives of the  Platform for Action and relevant international agreements to  ensure progress.

 

123. The effective suppression of trafficking in women and girls for the sex trade is a matter of pressing international concern. Implementation of the 1949 Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others, 18/ as well as other relevant instruments, needs to be reviewed and strengthened.  The use of women in international prostitution and trafficking networks has become a major focus of international organized crime.  The Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights on violence against women, who has explored these acts as an additional cause of the violation of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and girls, is invited to address, within her mandate and as a matter of urgency, the issue of international trafficking for the purposes of the sex trade, as well as the issues of forced prostitution, rape, sexual abuse and sex tourism.  Women and girls who are victims of this international trade are at an increased risk of further violence, as well as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection, including infection with HIV/AIDS.

 

125 (d) Adopt and/or implement and periodically review and analyse  legislation to ensure its effectiveness in eliminating  violence against women, emphasizing the prevention of violence  and the prosecution of offenders; take measures to ensure the  protection of women subjected to violence, access to just and  effective remedies, including compensation and indemnification  and healing of victims, and rehabilitation of perpetrators;

 

125 (e) Work actively to ratify and/or implement international human  rights norms and instruments as they relate to violence  against women, including those contained in the Universal  Declaration of Human Rights, 19/ the International Covenant on  Civil and Political Rights, 12/ the International Covenant on  Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 12/ and the Convention  against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading  Treatment or Punishment; 20/

 

125  (f) Implement the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of  Discrimination against Women, taking into account general  recommendation 19 adopted by the Committee on the Elimination  of Discrimination against Women, at its eleventh session; 21/

 

125 (g) Promote an active and visible policy of mainstreaming a gender  perspective in all policies and programmes related to violence  against women and actively encourage, supportand implement  measures and programmes aimed at increasing the knowledge and  understanding of the causes, consequences and mechanisms of  violence against women among those responsible for  implementing these policies, such as law enforcement officers,  police personnel and judicial, medical and social workers, as  well as those who deal with minority, migration and refugee  issues, and develop strategies to ensure that the  revictimization of women victims of violence does not occur  because of gender-insensitive laws or judicial or enforcement  practices;

 

 

125  (j) Formulate and implement, at all appropriate levels, plans of  action to eliminate violence against women;

 

 

125 (p) Allocate adequate resources within the government budget and  mobilize community resources for activities related to the  elimination of violence against women, including resources for  the implementation of plans of action at all appropriate  levels;

 

 

125  (q) Include in reports submitted in accordance with the provisions  of relevant United Nations human rights instruments,  information pertaining to violence against women and measures  taken to implement the Declaration on the Elimination of

 Violence against Women;

 

129   Encourage the dissemination and implementation of the UNHCR  Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women and the UNHCR  Guidelines on the Prevention of and Response to Sexual Violence  against Refugees.

 

 

130 (a) Promote research, collect data and compile statistics,  especially concerning domestic violence relating to the  prevalence of different forms of  violence against women and  encourage research into the causes, nature, seriousness and  consequences of violence against women and the effectiveness  of measures implemented to prevent and redress violence  against women;

 

 

135.In a world of continuing instability and violence, the implementation of cooperative approaches to peace and security is urgently needed.  The equal access and full participation of women in power structures and their full involvement in all efforts for the prevention and resolution of conflicts are essential for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security.  Although women have begun to play an important role in conflict resolution, peace-keeping and defence and foreign affairs mechanisms, they are still underrepresented in decision- making positions.  If women are to play an equal part in securing and maintaining peace,  they must be empowered politically and economically and represented adequately at all levels of decision-making.

 

 

148 (b) In reviewing the implementation of the plan of action for the

 United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004),  take into account the results of the Fourth World Conference  on Women:  Action for Equality, Development and Peace;

 

 

149. By Governments, intergovernmental and non- governmental organizations and other institutions involved in providing protection, assistance and training to refugee women, other displaced women in need of international protection and internally displaced women, including the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the World Food Programme, as appropriate:

 

(a) Take steps to ensure that women are fully involved in the  planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of  all short-term and long-term projects and programmes providing  assistance to  refugee women, other displaced women in need of  international protection and internally displaced women,  including the management of refugee camps and resources;  ensure that refugee and displaced women and girls have direct  access to the services provided;

 

 

150. By Governments:   (a) Disseminate and implement the UNHCR Guidelines on the  Protection of Refugee Women and the UNHCR Guidelines on  Evaluation and Care of Victims of Trauma and Violence, or  provide similar guidance, in close cooperation with refugee  women and in all sectors of refugee programmes;

 

151. By Governments, intergovernmental and non- governmental

organizations:

151 (a) Support and promote the implementation of the right of self-  determination of all peoples as enunciated, inter alia, in the  Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action by providing  special programmes in leadership and in training for decision-  making;

 

 

151 (b) Support and promote the implementation of the right of self-  determination of all peoples as enunciated, inter alia, in the  Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action by providing  special programmes in leadership and in training for decision-  making.

 

 

167. By Governments:   (a) Enact and enforce legislation to guarantee the rights of women  and men to equal pay for equal work or work of equal value;

 (b) Adopt and implement laws against discrimination based on sex  in the labour market, especially considering older women  workers, hiring and promotion, the extension of employment  benefits and social security, and working conditions;  

 

167 (k) Revise and implement national policies that support the  traditional savings, credit and lending mechanisms for women;

 

 

168 (h) Review, reformulate, if necessary, and implement policies,  including business, commercial and contract law and government  regulations, to ensure that they do not discriminate against  micro, small and medium-scale enterprises owned by women in  rural and urban areas;

 

168 (i) Analyse, advise on, coordinate and implement policies that  integrate the needs and interests of employed, self-employed  and entrepreneurial women into sectoral and inter-ministerial  policies, programmes and budgets;

 

 

168 (l) Safeguard and promote respect for basic workers' rights,  including the prohibition of forced labour and child labour,  freedom of association and the right to organize and bargain  collectively, equal remuneration for men and women for work of  equal value and non-discrimination in employment, fully  implementing the conventions of the International Labour  Organization in the case of States party to those conventions  and, taking into account the principles embodied in the case  of those countries that are not party to those conventions in  order to achieve truly sustained economic growth and  sustainable development.

 

 

169 (d) Ensure that women's priorities are included in public  investment programmes for economic infrastructure, such as  water and sanitation, electrification and energy conservation,  transport and road construction.  Promote greater involvement  of women beneficiaries at the project planning and  implementation stages to ensure access to jobs and contracts.

 

 

171. By multilateral funders and regional development banks, as well as bilateral and private funding agencies, at the international, regional and subregional levels:

 

 171 (a) Review, where necessary reformulate, and implement policies,  programmes and projects, to ensure that a higher proportion of  resources reach women in rural and remote areas;

 

180. By Governments, employers, employees, trade unions and women's organizations:

 

 (a) Implement and enforce laws and regulations and encourage  voluntary codes of conduct that ensure that international  labour standards, such as International Labour Organization  Convention 100 on equal pay and workers' rights, apply equally  to female and male workers;

 

 180 (b)Enact and enforce laws and introduce implementing measures,  including means of redress and access to justice in cases of  non-compliance, to prohibit direct and indirect discrimination  on grounds of sex, including by reference to marital or family  status in relation to access to employment, conditions of  employment, including training, promotion, health and safety,  as well as termination of employment and social security of  workers, including legal protection against sexual and racial  harassment;

 

 

180 (f) Implement and monitor positive public and private-sector  employment, equity and positive action programmes to address  systemic discrimination against women in the labour force, in  particular women with disabilities and women belonging to  other disadvantaged groups, with respect to hiring, retention  and promotion, and vocational training of women in all  sectors;

 

 

180 (k) Increase efforts to close the gap between women's and men's  pay, take stepsto implement the principle of equal  remuneration for equal work of equal value by strengthening  legislation, including compliance with international labour  laws and standards, and encourage job evaluation schemes with  gender-neutral criteria;

 

180 (m) Set specific target dates for eliminating all forms  of child  labour that are contrary to accepted international standards  and ensure the full enforcement of relevant existing laws and,  where appropriate, enact the legislation necessary to  implement the Convention on the Rights of the Child and  International Labour Organization standards, ensuring the  protection of working children, in particular, street  children, through the provision of appropriate health,  education and other social services;

 

 

189. The equitable distribution of power and decision-making at all levels is dependent on Governments and other actors undertaking statistical gender analysis and mainstreaming a gender perspective in policy development and the implementation of programmes.  Equality in decision-making is essential to the empowerment of women.  In some countries, affirmative action has led to 33.3 per cent or larger representation in local and national Governments.

 

192. (a) Commit themselves to establishing the goal of gender balance  in governmental bodies and committees, as well as in public  administrative entities, and in the judiciary, including,  inter alia, setting specific targets and implementing measures  to substantiallyincrease the number of women with a view to  achieving equal representation of women and men, if necessary  through positive action, in all governmental and public  administration positions;

 

195. By the United Nations:

  (a) Implement existing and adopt new employment policies and  measures in order to achieve overall gender equality,  particularly at the Professional level and above, by the year  2000, with due regard to the importance of recruiting staff on  as wide a geographical basis as possible, in conformity with  Article 101, paragraph 3, of the Charter of the United  Nations;

 

 

198. National machineries for the advancement of women have been established in almost every Member State to, inter alia, design, promote the implementation of, execute, monitor, evaluate, advocate and mobilize support for policies that promote the advancement of women.  National machineries are diverse in form and uneven in their effectiveness, and in some cases have declined.  Often marginalized in national government structures, these mechanisms are frequently hampered by unclear mandates, lack of adequate staff, training, data and sufficient resources, and insufficient support from national political leadership.

 

 

203. A national machinery for the advancement of women is the central policy-coordinating unit inside government.  Its main task is to support government-wide mainstreaming of a gender-equality perspective in all policy areas.  The necessary conditions for an effective functioning of such national machineries include:

 

203 (a) Location at the highest possible level in the government,  falling under the responsibility of a Cabinet minister;

   and  monitoring with a view to involving non-governmental  organizations and community organizations from the grass-roots  upwards;

 

 

(b) Based on a strong political commitment, create a national  machinery, where it does not exist, and strengthen, as  appropriate, existing national machineries, for the  advancement of women at the highest possible level of  government; it should have clearly defined mandates and  authority; critical elements would be adequate resources and  the ability and competence to influence policy and formulate  and review legislation.  Among other things, it should perform  policy analysis, undertake advocacy, communication,  coordination and monitoring of implementation;

 

206(e) Report, on a regular basis, to legislative bodies on the  progress of efforts, as appropriate, to mainstream gender  concerns, taking into account the implementation of the  Platform for Action;

 

207 (b) Regularly review national policies, programmes and projects,  as well as their implementation, evaluating the impact of  employment and income policies in order to guarantee that  women are direct beneficiaries of development and that their  full contribution to development, both remunerated and  unremunerated, is considered in economic policy and planning;

 

 

207 (e) Give all ministries the mandate to review policies and  programmes from a gender perspective and in the light of the  Platform for Action.  Locate the responsibility for the  implementation of that mandate at the highest possible level.  Establish and/or strengthen an inter-ministerial coordination  structure to carry out this mandate and monitor progress and  to network with relevant machineries.

 

 

208. (a) Facilitate the formulation and implementation of government  policies on equality between women and men, develop  appropriate strategies and methodologies, and promote  coordination and cooperation within the central government in  order to ensure mainstreaming of a gender perspective in all  policy-making processes;

 

209 (b) Collect, compile, analyse and present on a regular basis data  disaggregated by age, sex, socio-economic and other relevant  indicators, including number of dependants, for utilization in  policy and programme planning and implementation and to  reflect problems and questions related to men and women in  society;

 

209 (c) Involve centres for women's studies and research organizations  in developing and testing appropriate indicators and research  methodologies to strengthen gender analysis, as well as in  monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the goals of  the Platform for Action;

 

210  (d) Use more gender-sensitive data in the formulation of policy  and implementation of programmes and projects.

 

 

218. In order to protect the human rights of women, it is necessary to avoid, as far as possible, resorting to reservations and to ensure that no reservation is incompatible with the object and purpose of the Convention or is otherwise incompatible with international treaty law. Unless the human rights of women, as defined by international human rights instruments, are fully recognized and effectively protected, applied, implemented and enforced in national law as well as in national practice in family, civil, penal, labour and commercial codes and administrative rules and regulations, they will exist in name only.

 

 

219. In those countries that have not yet become parties to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other international human rights instruments, or where reservations that are incompatible with the object or purpose of the Convention have been entered, or where national laws have not yet been revised to implement international norms and standards, women's de jure equality is not yet secured.  Women's full enjoyment of equal rights is undermined by the discrepancies between some national legislation and international law and international instruments on human rights.  Overly complex administrative procedures, lack of awareness within the judicial process and inadequate monitoring of the violation of the human rights of all women, coupled with the underrepresentation of women in justice systems, insufficient information on existing rights and persistent attitudes and practices perpetuate women's de facto inequality. De facto inequality is also perpetuated by the lack of enforcement of, inter alia, family, civil, penal, labour and commercial laws or codes, or administrative rules and regulations intended to ensure women's full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

 

Strategic objective I.1.   Promote and protect the human rights of women, through the full implementation of all human rights instruments, especially the Convention on the Elimination of  All Forms of Discrimination against Women

 

230. (a) Work actively towards ratification or accession to and  implement international and regional human rights treaties;

 

 

230 (b) Ratify and accede to and ensure implementation of the  Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination  against Women so that universal ratification of the Convention  can be achieved by the year 2000;

 

 

230 (h) If they are States parties, implement the Convention by  reviewing all national laws, policies, practices and  procedures to ensure that theymeet the obligations set out in  the Convention; all States should undertake a review of all  national laws, policies, practices and procedures to ensure  that  they meet international human rights obligations in this  matter;

 

 

230  (j) Report on schedule to the Committee on the Elimination of  Discrimination against Women regarding the implementation of  the Convention, following fully the guidelines established by  the Committee and involving non-governmental organizations,  where appropriate, or taking into account their contributions  in the preparation of the report;

 

 

230 (m) Take urgent measures to achieve universal ratification of or  accession to the Convention on the Rights of the Child before  the end of 1995 and ensure full implementation of the  Convention to ensure equal rights for girls and boys, and urge  those that have not already done so to become a party in order  to realize universal implementation of the Convention on the  Rights of the Child by the year 2000;

 

230 (o) Strengthen the implementation of all relevant human rights  instruments in order to combat and eliminate, including  through international cooperation, organized and other forms  of trafficking in women and children, including for the  purposes of sexual exploitation, pornography, prostitution and  sex tourism, and provide legal and social services to the  victims.  This should include provisions forinternational  cooperation to prosecute and punish those responsible for  organized exploitation of women and children;

 

 

231 (b) Ensure the implementation of the recommendations of the World  Conference on Human Rights for the full integration and  mainstreaming of the human rights of women;

 

 231 (c) Develop a comprehensive policy programme for mainstreaming the  human rights of women throughout the United Nations system,  including activities with regard to advisory services,  technical assistance, reporting methodology, gender impact  assessments, coordination, public information and human rights  education, and play an active role in the  implementation of  the programme;

 

231(d) Review national laws, including customary laws and legal  practices in the areas of family, civil, penal, labour and  commercial law in order to ensure the implementation of the  principles and procedures of all relevant international human  rights instruments by means of national legislation, and  revoke any remaining laws that discriminate on the basis of  sex and remove gender bias in the administration of justice;

 

232(p) Strengthen and encourage the implementation of the  recommendations contained in the Standard Rules on the  Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities,  paying special attention to ensure non-discrimination and  equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms  by women and girls with disabilities, including their access  to information and services in the field of violence against  women, as well as their active participation in and economic  contribution to all aspects of society;

 

 

233  (f) Encourage, coordinate and cooperate with local and regional  women's groups, relevant non-governmental organizations,  educators and the media, to implement programmes in human  rights education to make women aware of their human rights;

 

 

243 (a) Promote research and implementation of a strategy of  information, education and communication aimed at promoting a  balanced portrayal of women and girls and their multiple  roles;

 

253 (a) Ensure opportunities for women, including indigenous women, to  participate in environmental decision-making at all levels,  including as managers, designers and planners, and as  implementers and evaluators of environmental projects;

 

 

243 (e) Take measures to integrate a gender perspective in the design  and implementation of, among other things, environmentally  sound and sustainable resource management mechanisms,  production techniques and infrastructure development in rural  and urban areas;

 

254 (d) Establish strategies and mechanisms to increase the proportion  of women, particularly at grass-roots levels, involved as  decision makers, planners, managers, scientists and technical  advisers and as beneficiaries in the design, development and  implementation of policies and programmes for natural resource  management and environmental protection and conservation;

 

 

254 (i) Develop programmes to involve female professionals and  scientists, as well as technical, administrative and clerical  workers, inenvironmental management, develop training  programmes for girls and women in these fields, expand  opportunities for the hiring and promotion of women in these  fields and implement  special measures to advance women's  expertise and participation in these activities;

 

256 (i) Develop programmes to involve female professionals and  scientists, as well as technical, administrative and clerical  workers, inenvironmental management, develop training  programmes for girls and women in these fields, expand  opportunities for the hiring and promotion of women in these  fields and implement  special measures to advance women's  expertise and participation in these activities;

 

256 (l) Ensure that clean water is available and accessible to all by  the year 2000 and that environmental protection and  conservation plans are designed and implemented to restore  polluted water systems and rebuild damaged watersheds.

 

 

259 (d) Promote coordination within and among institutions to  implement the Platform for Action and chapter 24 of Agenda 21  by, inter alia, requesting the Commission on Sustainable  Development, through the Economic and Social Council, to seek  input from the Commission on the Status of Women when  reviewing the implementation of Agenda 21 with regard to women  and the environment.

 

 

274(a) By States that have not signed or ratified the Convention on  the Rights of the Child, take urgent measures towards signing  and ratifying the Convention, bearing in mind the strong  exhortation made at the World Conference on Human Rights to  sign it before the end of 1995, and by States that have signed  and ratified the Convention, ensure its full implementation  through the adoption of all necessary legislative,  administrative and other measures and by fostering an enabling  environment that encourages full respect for the rights of  children;

 

274 (f) Develop and implement comprehensive policies, plans of action  and programmes for the survival, protection, development and  advancement of the girl child to promote and protect the full  enjoyment of her human rights and to ensure equal  opportunities for girls; these plans should form an integral  part of the total development process;

 

274 (g) Ensure the disaggregation by sex and age of all data related  to children in the health, education and other sectors in  order to include a gender perspective in planning,  implementation and monitoring of such programmes.

 

 

278 (a) Generate awareness of the disadvantaged situation of girls  among policy makers, planners, administrators and implementors  at all levels, as well as within households and communities;

 

286. The Platform for Action establishes a set of actions that should lead to fundamental change.  Immediate action and accountability are essential if the targets are to be met by the year 2000.  Implementation is primarily the responsibility of Governments, but is also dependent on a wide range of institutions in the public, private and non- governmental sectors at the community, national, subregional/regional

 

 

 

286. The Platform for Action establishes a set of actions that should lead to fundamental change.  Immediate action and accountability are essential if the targets are to be met by the year 2000.  Implementation is primarily the responsibility of Governments, but is also dependent on a wide range of institutions in the public, private and non- governmental sectors at the community, national, subregional/regional STRONGLY AGREE 1 2 3 4  5  STRONGLY DISAGREE)

 

288. Implementation of the Platform for Action by national, subregional/regional and international institutions, both public and private, would be facilitated by transparency, by increased linkages between networks and organizations   and by a consistent flow of information among all concerned.  Clear objectives and accountability mechanisms are also required.  Links with other institutions at the national, subregional/regional and international levels and with networks and organizations devoted to the advancement of women are needed. STRONGLY AGREE 1 2 3 4  5  STRONGLY DISAGREE)

 

289. Non-governmental and grass-roots organizations have a specific role to play in creating a social, economic, political and intellectual climate based on equality between women and men.  Women should be for Action. in the internal dynamics of institutions and organizations, including values, behaviour, rules and procedures that are inimical to the advancement of women. Sexual harassment should be eliminated. should have strong and clear mandates and the authority, resources and for Action.  Their methods of operation should ensure efficient and effective implementation of the Platform.  There should be a clearwomen and men as a basis for all actions. STRONGLY AGREE 1 2 3 4  5  STRONGLY DISAGREE)

 

 

 

292. To ensure effective implementation of the Platform for Action and to enhance the work for the advancement of women at the national, subregional/ regional and international levels, Governments, the United Nations system and all other relevant organizations should promote an inter alia, in the monitoring and evaluation of all policies  STRONGLY AGREE 1 2 3 4  5  STRONGLY DISAGREE)

 

293. Governments have the primary responsibility for implementing the Platform for Action.  Commitment at the highest political level is advancement of women.  The Fourth World Conference on Women is a requires commitment from Governments and the international community. The Platform for Action is part of a continuing process and has a catalytic effect as it will contribute to programmes and practical outcomes for girls and women of all ages.  States and the international commitments for action.  As part of this process, many States have made commitments for action as reflected, inter alia, in their national

 

294. National mechanisms and institutions for the advancement of women should participate in public policy formulation and encourage the implementation of the Platform for Action through various bodies and institutions, including the private sector, and, where necessary, should act as a catalyst in developing new programmes by the year 2000 in areas that are not covered by existing institutions.

 

297. As soon as possible, preferably by the end of 1995, Governments, in consultation with relevant institutions and non-governmental

organizations, should begin to develop implementation strategies for the Platform and, preferably by the end of 1996, should have developed their strategies or plans of action.  This planning process should draw upon persons at the highest level of authority in Government and relevant comprehensive, have time-bound targets and benchmarks for monitoring, and include proposals for allocating or reallocating resources for community could be enlisted, including resources.

 

300 B.  Subregional/regional level subregional/ regional structures should promote and assist the pertinent national institutions in monitoring and implementing the global Platform for Action within their mandates.  This should be done in coordination with the implementation of the respective regional platforms or plans of Women, taking into account the need for a coordinated follow-up to

related fields.

 

301. In order to facilitate the regional implementation, monitoring and commissions within their mandates, including their women's units/focal Consideration should be given, inter alia, and, where appropriate, to strengthening capacity in this respect.

 

302. Within their existing mandates and activities, the regional commissions should mainstream women's issues and gender perspectives and should also consider the establishment of mechanisms and processes to ensure the implementation and monitoring of both the Platform for Action commissions should, within their mandates, collaborate on gender issues organizations, financial and research institutions and the private sector.

 

303. Regional offices of the specialized agencies of the United Nations system should, as appropriate, develop and publicize a plan of action for implementing the Platform for Action, including the identification of time-frames and resources.  Technical assistance and operational targets for the advancement of women.  To this end, regular coordination should be undertaken among United Nations bodies and agencies.

 

305. The Platform for Action needs to be implemented through the work of all of the bodies and organizations of the United Nations system during the period 1995-2000, specifically and as an integral part of wider programming.  An enhanced framework for international cooperation for gender issues must be developed during the period 1995-2000 in order to ensure the integrated and comprehensive implementation, follow-up and assessment of the Platform for Action, taking into account the results of global United Nations summits and conferences.  The fact that at all of these summits and conferences, Governments have committed themselves to the empowerment of women in different areas, makes coordination crucial to the follow-up strategies for this Platform for Action. The Agenda for Development and the Agenda for Peace should take into account

 

313. The General Assembly, as the highest intergovernmental body in the United Nations, is the principal policy-making and appraisal organ on matters relating to the follow-up to the Conference, and as such, should integrate gender issues throughout its work.  It should appraise progress in the effective implementation of the Platform for Action, recognizing that these issues cut across social, political and economic policy.  At its fiftieth session, in 1995, the General Assembly will have before it the report of the Fourth World Conference on Women.  In accordance with its resolution 49/161, it will also examine a report of the Secretary-General on the follow-up to the Conference, taking into account the recommendations of the Conference.  The General Assembly should include the follow-up to the Conference as part of its continuing work on the advancement of women.  In 1996, 1998 and 2000, it should review the implementation of the Platform for Action. Economic and Social Council

 

314. The Economic and Social Council, in the context of its role under Assembly resolutions 45/264, 46/235 and 48/162, would oversee system-wide coordination in the implementation of the Platform for invited to review the implementation of the Platform for Action, giving due consideration to the reports of the Commission on the Status of the mandate of the Commission on the Status of Women, taking into commissions and Conference follow-up.  The Council should incorporate consideration to recommendations prepared by the Commission.  It should consider dedicating at least one high-level segment before the year 2000 to the  advancement of women and implementation of the Platform for Action with the active involvement and participation, inter alia, of the specialized agencies, including the World Bank and IMF.

 

316. The Council should consider dedicating at least one operational activities segment before the year 2000 to the coordination of development activities related to gender, based on the revised system-wide medium-term plan for the advancement of women, with a view to instituting guidelines and procedures for implementation of the Platform for Action by the funds and programmes of the United Nations system.

From a content analysis of the Beijing Declaration and the Platform of Action

Compiled by the Global Compliance Project, and presented at a public meeting as a 12 foot scroll of expectations about implementation of the Platform of Action

 

Contact: Dr. Joan E. Russow

1230 St. Patrick St. Victoria, B.C. CANADA

Tel/FAX (604) 598-0071; e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

...

 

 

POST- 50

1996 GLOBAL COMPLIANCE RESOLUTION

         

          We prepared the following draft resolution for the “We the Peoples Conference: the Role of Civil Society in the History and Future of the United Nations”. This resolution called upon states, at the June 26, 1995 UN Affirmation Ceremony, to pledge to discharge fifty years of obligations.

          This resolution was adopted by the plenary at the Conference, and the assembly agreed that the resolution should be passed on to Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali who subsequently addressed the plenary. We recently received a letter of support from Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali:

 

Thank you for sharing with me the “Global Compliance Resolution” whose spirit reaffirms the commitment of people the world over to the principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations (signed, Boutros Boutros-Ghali July 5, 1995)

 

Since then on September 13, a version of the Global Compliance resolution was officially distributed to all delegations of the member states at the United Nations at the United Nations Conference on Women: Equality, Development and Peace. The Global Compliance resolution was distributed again to all delegations of the member states of the United Nations on September 15, on the final day of the conference.

A proposed resolution for October 24 was sent to all the UN 50th Anniversary representatives. A response was received from Dr. Sohreh Tabatabai, the Coordinator, Fiftieth Anniversary Secretariat:

 

  I regret that it is not possible for us to arrange for presentation of the Global compliance Resolution to the General Assembly. As resolutions may be introduced only by Member States ...

  You may be interested to learn  that the special commemorative session of the General Assembly planned for 22-24 October is expected to endorse a Declaration rededicating Member States to achieving the goals of the United Nations Charter.

 

STATES HAVE CONTINUALLY BEEN PREPARED TO DEDICATE THEMSELVES TO ACHIEVING THE GOALS OF THE UNITED NATIONS CHARTER. THEY ARE, HOWEVER,  NOT PREPARED TO DISCHARGE 50 YEARS OF OBLIGATIONS. THE GLOBAL COMPLIANCE RESOLUTION CALLS UPON STATES TO DISCHARGE 50 YEARS OF OBLIGATIONS WHICH IF FULFILLED WOULD DEMONSTRATE THEIR DEDICATION TO ACHIEVING THE GOALS OF THE UNITED NATIONS.

 

THE GLOBAL COMPLIANCE PROJECT CHALLENGES A STATE  TO PROPOSE THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION TO COMPLEMENT THE DECLARATION OF REDEDICATION TO THE ORIGINAL PURPOSE OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS.

 

51/1 Proclamation of the International Year of Global Compliance

 

The General Assembly

 

          Whereas the General Assembly has decided unanimously to proclaim solemnly, on the  Fifty-first Anniversary of the United Nations, the International Year of Global Compliance on the 24 October 1996,

          Whereas for fifty-one years, since the formation of the United Nations, member states of the United Nations have undertaken in UN system governing bodies obligations reflected in Charters, Covenants, Conventions, Declarations and Resolutions,

          Whereas, if these fifty-one years of obligations had been honored and acted upon, respect for human rights could have been guaranteed, preservation and protection of the environment could have been ensured, threats to peace prevented and removed, disarmament achieved, and socially equitable and environmentally sound development could have been enabled,

          Whereas fulfillment of the purpose of the United Nations would require the discharging of the fifty-one years of obligations related to guaranteeing respect for human rights, preserving and protecting the environment, promoting peace, and ensuring socially equitable and environmentally sound development;

          Whereas, the freeing up of money through the peace dividend would assist in the discharging of these obligations,

          Whereasthe Fifty-first Anniversary of the United Nations provides a unique opportunity to reaffirm the support for and commitment to the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United nations, and to undertake to discharge previous obligations   undertaken through Charters, Covenants, Conventions, Declarations and Resolutions,

 

Now, therefore,

 

The General Assembly, and its member states

Solemnly proclaim October 1995 the International Day of Global Compliance

 

and solemnly pledge to do the following:

 

• to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and international law can be maintained;

• to fulfill fifty years of obligations undertaken through Conventions, Treaties, Declarations and Resolutions made in the UN system;

• to sign and ratify what they have not yet signed and ratified, and to enact the necessary legislation to ensure the discharging of these obligations;

• to fulfill additional obligations undertaken through globally adopted UN Conference action plans, and programs of action.

 

50th plenary meeting 24, October, 1996

 


 

 

CONCURRING with the Jakarta Declaration that the world today is still far from being a peaceful, just and secure place. Simmering disputes, violent conflicts, aggression and foreign occupation, interference in the internal affairs of states, policies of hegemony and domination, ethnic strife, religious intolerance, new forms of racism and narrowly conceived nationalism are major and dangerous obstacles to harmonious co-existence among states and peoples and have even led to the disintegration of states and societies;

 

CONCURRING with UNCED that Humanity stands at a defining moment in history, we are confronted with a perpetuation of disparities between and within nations, a worsening of poverty, hunger, ill health and illiteracy and the continuing deterioration of the ecosystem on which we depend for our well being (Agenda 21, UNCED, 1992);

 

CONCURRING with the international Conference on Population and Development that “around the world many of the basic resources on which future generations will depend for their survival and well-being are being depleted and environmental degradation is intensifying, driven by unsustainable patterns of production and consumption, unprecedented growth in population, widespread and persistent poverty, and social and economic inequality”. (Preamble, 1.2 1994 , International Conference on Population and Development);

 

CONCURRING with the International Conference on Population and Development that Women who have unwanted pregnancies should shall have ready access to reliable information and compassionate counseling. any measures or changes related to abortion within the health system can only be determined at the national or local level according to the national legislative process. In circumstances where abortion is not against the law, such abortion should be safe. In all cases, women should have access to quality services for the management of complications arising from abortion. Post-abortion counseling, education and family-planning services should be offered promptly, which will also help to avoid repeat abortions. (8.25, International Conference on Population and Development, 1994);

 

MINDFUL that while distinct cultural traditions contribute to the wealth of global diversity, no cultural practices that are in violation of fundamental human rights shall be tolerated by the global civil society;

 

APPRECIATING the right of specific religious practices; practices that violate fundamental human rights shall not be condoned. Such practices such as genital mutilation shall be immediately globally condemned;

 

WELCOMING the commitment in the Platform of Action (1995) to take special measures to ensure women’s equal access to and full participation in the decision making process, and to promote the full and equal participation of women in power structures and decision making at all levels and at all areas, including international;

 

AFFIRMING the equal access to and full participation of women in the decision making of international affairs within the United Nations, women call upon the member states of the United Nations to fulfill 50 years of obligations by signing what they have not signed, by ratifying what they have not ratified, by enacting legislation to ensure compliance and by implementing the necessary measures for discharging these obligations. In addition women in Beijing called upon states to undertake new commitment that might be necessary for the discharging of these obligations and for the creation of a world of peace, where the fulfillment of basic needs and human rights to food, shelter, education, health and safety are guaranteed as inalienable and fundamental rights. Women also call for a redefinition of development based on equitable and ecological principles;

 

REAFFIRMING the recognition of the equal rights of men and women (Charter, United Nations, 1945);

 

REAFFIRMING the recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world (Preamble, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948);

 

REAFFIRMING that the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom (Preamble, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948);

 

REAFFIRMING that Everyone is entitled to all the rights an freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, tribe, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, sexual orientation, family structure, or other status. (Art. 2, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948), CLARIFYING that the term “other status” is an open term which includes forms of discrimination that are now prevalent such as that on the grounds of “sexual orientation” and “family structure”, and that in the future the term “other status” will include future unanticipated forms of discrimination.

 

CONVINCED that sovereign rights shall not be used to justify the continuation of a practice that is in violation of human rights, is ecologically destructive, contributes to violence, conflict and war, or increases the threat to peace;

 

REAFFIRMING the Convention on the Rights of the child that, in accordance with the principles proclaimed in the Charter of the United Nations, recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world:

 

REAFFIRMING that [the provision] [Provide] of access to safe and healthy shelter is essential to a person's physical, psychological, social and economic well-being and should shall be a fundamental part of national and         international action. The right to adequate housing as a basic human right is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights (7.6, Settlement, Agenda 21, UNCED, 1992)

 

REAFFIRMING that every man, woman and child has the inalienable right to be free from hunger and malnutrition in order to develop fully and maintain their physical and mental faculties. Society today already possess sufficient resources, organizational ability and technology and hence the competence to achieve this objective. Accordingly, the eradication of hunger is a common objective of all the countries of the international community, especially of the developed countries and others in a position to help. (Art. 1. Universal Declaration on the Eradication of Hunger and Malnutrition, 1974) The need for society to properly channel its resources in ways that will eradicate hunger rather than exacerbate it.

 

PROCLAIMING thatIt is a fundamental responsibility of Governments to work together for higher food production and a more equitable and efficient distribution of food between countries and within countries. Governments should shall initiate immediately a greater concerted attack on chronic malnutrition and deficiency diseases among the vulnerable and lower income groups. In order to ensure adequate nutrition for all, Governmentsshould formulate appropriate [shall ensure] food and nutrition policies [are] integrated in overall socio-economic and agricultural development plans based on adequate knowledge of available as well as potential food resources (Sect. 2, Universal Declaration on the Eradication of Hunger and Malnutrition, 1974)

 

REAFFIRMING that The States parties to the present Covenant recognize the right of everyone to social security, including social insurance (Art. 9., International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 1966)

 

 

REAFFIRMING  that The States... recognize the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living. for himself [herself] and his [her] family, including adequate food, clothing and housing and to the continuous improvement of living conditions. the states parties will take [appropriate~] steps to ensure the realization of this right recognizing to this effect the essential importance of international co-operation based on free consent (Art.11.1, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 1966)

 

 MINDFUL that while distinct cultural traditions contribute to the wealth of global diversity, no cultural or religious practices that are in violation of fundamental human rights shall be tolerated by the global civil society;

 

CONCURRING that indigenous and tribal peoples shall enjoy the full measure of human rights and fundamental freedoms without hindrance or discrimination. the provisions of the Convention shall be applied without discrimination to male and female members of these peoples. (Art. 3 Convention (no. 169) concerning indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent countries);

 

MINDFUL that since the first United Nations Conference on the Environment in Stockholm in 1972 we have come to realize that the threats to the biosphere which sustains all life on this planet have increased in rate, magnitude and scale beyond expectation; inaction is negligent; the international community has enough information about the pending state of ecological irreversibility that it must act immediately;

 

Mindful of the spirit, principles, aims and functions of the World Charter for Nature adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations at its thirty-seventh session as a rule of ethics in respect of the human environment and the conservation of natural resources, (Preamble, Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal, 1992);

 

CONCURRING that every form of life is unique, warranting respect regardless of its worth to man [Humanity], and to accord other organisms such recognition's, man [humans] must be guided by a moral code of action (∞ World Charter of nature, 1982)

 

RECOGNIZING That Humankind is a part of nature and life depends on the uninterrupted functioning of natural systems which ensure the supply of energy and nutrients (World Charter of Nature, 1992);

 

COMMITTED to the invoking of the precautionary principle, as enunciated in the Biodiversity Convention:

 where there is a threat of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should shall not be used as a reason for postponing measures to avoid or minimize such a threat (from the Biodiversity Convention, 1992);

 

COMPLYING with the non-transference principle from the Rio Declaration

States should shall effectively cooperate to discourage or prevent the relocation and transfer to other States of any activities and substances that cause severe environmental degradation or are found to be harmful to human health (Principle 14 Rio Declaration, 1992);

 

CONCURRING with the assessment in recent international instruments that significant responsibility for the current urgency of the global situation lies in a current model of development which contributes to the increase of conflict, to the escalation of war, to the violation of human rights, to the destruction of the environment and to the denial of equality and equity;

 

CONCURRING that the current model of development reflects the unbridled power and practices of transnationals which have contributed to the increase of conflict, to the escalation of war, to the violation of human rights, to the degradation of the environment, and to exploitative development;

 

CONVINCED that the charters of all the transnationals that have contributed to conflict, to the escalation of war, to the violation of human rights and to the degradation of the environment shall be revoked. In addition full compensation shall be sought from the transnationals and funds shall be transferred into assisting the member states of the United Nations to promote and fully guarantee respect for human rights, to ensure the preservation and protection of the environment, to create a global structure that respects the rule of law, to achieve a state of peace, justice and security , and to participate in  socially equitable/equal and environmentally sound development;

 

RECOGNIZING the need to Enact legislation to allow conscientious objectors to redirect the military portion of the state budget to peaceful purposes (Conscience Canada, Peace tax Campaign, War Resisters International);

 

REAFFIRMING the urgent need to reinforce the endeavours of all States and international action in the area of the reduction of military budgets, with a view to reaching international agreements to freeze, reduce or otherwise restrain military expenditures (A. 1 Resolution 36/82 1981, Reduction of Military Budgets. 1981);

 

MINDFUL that as agreed in 1972 at Stockholm weapons of mass destruction must be eliminated, and that as recognized through numerous UN General Assembly Resolutions, the military budget must be frozen at 1981 levels (as decided in 1981through General Assembly resolutions), and that the largest proportion of the military budget shall be used to achieve and maintain peace, to restore degraded ecosystems and to provide restitution to those having been impacted by war;

 

RECALLING the Declaration of the 1980s as the Second Disarmament Decade, which provides that during this period renewed efforts should be made to reach agreement on the reduction of military expenditures and the reallocation of resources thus saved to economic and social development, especially for the benefit of developing countries, (Preamble, UN Resolution 36/82 1981, Reduction of Military Budgets); 

 

COMMITTED to establishing a time-table for phasing out fossil fuel and nuclear energy and for the rapid development of soar and other forms of non-polluting energy, and for more efficient energy use; (Nobel Laureate , UNCED, 1992);

 

RECOGNIZING that outstanding obstacles and systemic constraints have prevented the establishment of the international political will necessary to discharge previous obligations and to undertake new commitments, and that many of these obstacles and systemic constraints arise from the current economic model of development;

 

CONVINCED that in 1996, on the first post-50 anniversary of the United Nations, the member states of the United Nations must ensure that the previous 50 years of obligations are fully discharged, and be willing to make additional commitments which might be necessary to finally bring about fulfillment of the ideals of the United Nations — a world free from the scourge of war, a world of equality for all humanity and a world worthy of passing on to future generations;

 

 

We, the state members of the United Nations pledge that we will, in 1996, on October 24th on the first post-50th Anniversary of the United Nations

move into the next stage of the United Nations: the stage of compliance, implementation and enforcement in which we fulfill the original objectives of the United Nations and establish a civil community of global compliance, equality, peace and justice.

• We will sign what we have not yet signed,

• We will ratify what we have not yet ratify,

• We will enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance, and

• We will enforce and monitor the enforcement of our international obligations.

 

STATE:

CONTACT PERSON

ADDRESS

 

 

Please send  to the Secretary General of the United Nations, and a copy to the Global Compliance Project

Contact: Dr. Joan E. Russow

Co-ordinator, Global Compliance Research Project

1230 St. Patrick Street, Victoria, B.C. CANADA V8S 4Y4

 

 

 

PROCLAMATION FOR TRANSLATING WORDS OF RHETORIC TO ACTION OF COMPLIANCE, IMPLEMENTATION AND ENFORCEMENT: COVENANT OF IMPLEMENTATION.

.

The Global Compliance Research Project prepared the Charter of Obligations”— a 350 page compilation of 50 years of obligations incurred internationally in the area of human rights, peace, environment and social justice. This Charter was approved for official distribution as a research document and circulated to every state delegation at the Fourth UN conference on Women: Equality, Development and Peace. Since Beijing we have done a content analysis of the Beijing Declaration and the Platform of Action and we are  linking the Charter of Obligations with what we have referred to as the “Covenant of Implementation”—84 x 8 inch covenant of 10 point single-spaced references to statements related to the  need for implementation. The statements in the Charter and the Covenant have been linked with concerns expressed by the Women Participating in the NGO Forum for the purpose of determining which issues could be accommodated within existing obligations. This analysis could assist in planning for lobbying activities by delineating which issues have been covered by previous instruments and thus require implementation and which issues need to be accommodated in future international instruments. 50 years of obligations exist, what is needed is to determine what would constitute compliance, implementation and enforcement of these obligations.

 

 

 

GLOBAL COMPLIANCE RESEARCH PROJECT

 

The Global Compliance Research Project is a project linking over 60 states. For the Beijing Conference . The Global Compliance Research Project prepared the Charter of Obligations”— a 350 page compilation of 50 years of obligations incurred internationally in the area of human rights, peace, environment and social justice. This Charter was approved for official distribution as a research document and circulated to every state delegation at the Fourth UN conference on Women: Equality, Development and Peace. Every year until the states agree the Global Compliance Research Project will lobby states to endorse the Global Compliance Resolution which call upon states to sign what they have not yet signed, ratified what they have not ratified, enact the necessary legislation to ensure compliance, and to undertake to enforce accrued obligations. Also   the Global Compliance Research Project will update the Charter of Obligations and circulate the Charter to members of the Global Compliance Research Project. Furthermore, the Global Compliance Research Project has developed an educational program called “principle-based” education which If you would like to be a member of the Global Compliance Research project or if you would like a copy of the Charter of Obligations. Please fill out and return the following form:

 

I would like to be a member of the Global Compliance Research Project

If you would like to be a member of the Global Compliance Research Project please send

information about your interests and issues  

I would like to have a copy of the Charter of Obligations that was circulated in Beijing ($25 including postage)

I would like to have a copy of the next version of the 1996 Charter of Obligations ($30 including postage)

I would like to submit information on issues related to the implementation of international obligations for possible inclusion in the next Charter of Obligations

I would like to lobby my government to introduce the Global Compliance Resolution on the Floor of the General Assembly for October 24, 1996 “Year of Global Compliance

 

 

B. ADDRESSING MILITARISM

 

13. Excessive military expenditures, including global military expenditures and arms trade or trafficking, and investments for arms production and acquisition have reduced the resources available for social development. As a result of the debt burden and other economic difficulties, many developing countries have undertaken structural adjustment policies. Moreover, there are structural adjustment programmes that have been poorly designed and implemented, with resulting detrimental effects on social development. The number of people living in poverty has increased disproportionately in most developing countries, particularly the heavily indebted countries, during the past decade.

16. Widespread economic recession, as well as political instability in some regions, has been responsible for setting back development goals in many countries. This has led to the expansion of unspeakable poverty. Of the more than 1 billion people living in abject poverty, women are an overwhelming majority. The rapid process of change and adjustment in all sectors has also led to increased unemployment and underemployment, with particular impact on women. In many cases, structural adjustment programmes have not been designed to minimize their negative effects on vulnerable and disadvantaged groups or on women, nor have they been designed to assure positive effects on those groups by preventing their marginalization in economic and social activities. The Final Act of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations 10/ underscored the increasing interdependence of national economies, as well as the importance of trade liberalization and access to open, dynamic markets. There has also been heavy military spending in some regions. Despite increases in official development assistance (ODA) by some countries, ODA has recently declined overall.

138. Many women’s non-governmental organizations have called for reductions in military expenditures world wide, as well as in international trade and trafficking in and the proliferation of weapons. Those affected most negatively by conflict and excessive military spending are people living in poverty, who are deprived because of the lack of investment in basic services. Women living in poverty, particularly rural women, also suffer because of the use of arms that are particularly injurious or have indiscriminate effects. There are more than 100 million anti-personnel land-mines scattered in 64 countries globally. The negative impact on development of excessive military expenditures, the arms trade, and investment for arms production and acquisition must be addressed. At the same time, maintenance of national security and peace is an important factor for economic growth and development and the empowerment of women.

Strategic objective E.2. Reduce excessive military expenditures and control the availability of armaments Actions to be taken 143. By Governments: (a) Increase and hasten, as appropriate, subject to national security considerations, the conversion of military resources and related industries to development and peaceful purposes; (b) Undertake to explore new ways of generating new public and private financial resources, inter alia, through the appropriate reduction of excessive military expenditures, including global military expenditures, trade in arms and investment for arms production and acquisition, taking into consideration national security requirements, so as to permit the possible allocation of additional funds for social and economic development, in particular for the advancement of women;

Actions to be taken 143. By Governments: (a) Increase and hasten, as appropriate, subject to national security considerations, the conversion of military resources and related industries to development and peaceful purposes; (b) Undertake to explore new ways of generating new public and private financial resources, inter alia, through the appropriate reduction of excessive military expenditures, including global military expenditures, trade in arms and investment for arms production and acquisition, taking into consideration national security requirements, so as to permit the possible allocation of additional funds for social and economic development, in particular for the advancement of women; (c) Take action to investigate and punish members of the police, security and armed forces and others who perpetrate acts of violence against women, violations of international humanitarian law and violations of the human rights of women in situations of armed conflict; (d) While acknowledging legitimate national defence needs, recognize and address the dangers to society of armed conflict and the negative effect of excessive military expenditures, trade in arms, especially those arms that are particularly injurious or have indiscriminate effects, and excessive investment for arms production and acquisition; similarly, recognize the need to combat illicit arms trafficking, violence, crime, the production and use of and trafficking in illicit drugs, and trafficking in women and children;

 

138. Many women’s non-governmental organizations have called for reductions in military expenditures world wide, as well as in international trade and trafficking in and the proliferation of weapons. Those affected most negatively by conflict and excessive military spending are people living in poverty, who are deprived because of the lack of investment in basic services. Women living in poverty, particularly rural women, also suffer because of the use of arms that are particularly injurious or have indiscriminate effects. There are more than 100 million anti-personnel land-mines scattered in 64 countries globally. The women.

 

 

 

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 September 2015 14:43
 

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