Who's Online

We have 619 guests online

Popular

Earth News


Invoke the Precautionary Principle, no Highway through the Sooke Hills Wilderness PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 24 February 2019 10:05

 

by Joan Russow

Global Compliance Research Project

 

alt

from Sooke Mirror

 

In 1992, when there was a NDP Government, I received the following from Freedom of information;

In a document obtained through the Freedom of information Act there was evidence of the Provincial cabinet endorsement for the ratification of the Biodiversity and Climate Change Conventions:

..."The Province endorsed the ratification. We agreed with Canada to ratify it. There was provincial endorsement. The move to endorse the Conventions was made by John Cashore, the then B.C. Minister of Environment" Cashore then went to Cabinet, sought their support and endorsement of the ratification and then stated that the Cabinet had approved the Conventions to the CCME meeting

 

Through the endorsement, the BCT NDP government agreed to the precautionary principle as expressed in the UN Framework convention on Climate change and the convention on Biological Diversity. (obtained through freedom of information ,1992)

Last Updated on Sunday, 24 February 2019 10:30
Read more...
 
Cancel Site C, build gas plants, wind power: C.D. Howe PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 04 February 2019 14:35
 
Ratepayers better off if dams are cancelled, replaced with natural gas, wind, study says
By Nelson Bennett | January 17, 2019, 4:12pm
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/WhctKJVJfqMQHLxqMwgNWxPppgvLMXKXHsMWPxKhMqlGcvlRqRrDjfChJMRWCLGdGmdwtBg
 
alt
A powerhouse buttress at Site C dam. | BC Hydro
Cancelling multi-billion dollar hydro-electric dam projects like Site C in B.C. and Muskrat Falls in Labrador and providing power with natural gas and wind power would still be cheaper in the long-run, even with billions in sunk costs that governments and ratepayers would have to absorb.
 
That’s the conclusion of a study released January 17 for the C.D. Howe Institute.
 
Author A.J. Goulding says in his report that cost overruns at three large-scale Canadian hydro-electric dam projects should prompt governments to consider halting the projects, or at least stand as a lesson for other governments contemplating future large-scale hydro projects.
 
Goulding’s analysis finds the levelized costs of the $10.7 billion Site C dam and the $8.7 billion Keeysak project in Manitoba may exceed the cost of power that could be provided through combined cycle natural gas turbine (CCGT) power plants, even with the sunk costs of cancelling the projects, and even with a $50 per tonne carbon tax.
Read more...
 
223 international scientists urge B.C. to protect provincial rainforests PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 27 January 2019 17:28
 
'There are certain places that are so biologically rare and important'
Matt Humphrey · CBC News · Posted: Jun 28, 2018 8:00 AM PT | Last Updated: June 28, 2018
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/rain-forest-gone-1.4724448
 
alt
B.C. is known for its towering trees and temperate rain forests, but an international group of scientists is warning that without urgent protection, those forests are at risk of disappearing.
 
A total of 223 scientists from nine countries have signed a letter urging the provincial government to take immediate action to protect B.C.'s remaining temperate rain forests.
 
"There are certain places that are so biologically rare and important," said Dominick DellaSala, the chief scientist at the Geos Institute in Oregon who helped organize the letter.
 
"The B.C. rainforests are among those rare places."
 
NDP blamed for failing to save Vancouver Island old-growth giants from logging
DellaSala said both the province's coastal rainforests and rainforests further inland are dissimilar to anywhere else on the planet. Both play important roles in the preservation of biodiversity and the battle against climate change, he said.
Read more...
 
'It blows my mind': How B.C. destroys a key natural wildfire defence every year PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Sunday, 18 November 2018 21:02

Provincial rules require spraying of fire-resistant aspen trees to make way for valuable conifers

 

PLEASE SIGN PETITION 

 

https://www.change.org/p/government-of-british-columbia-stop-spraying-bc-forests-with-herbicide-to-kill-trees-like-poplar-that-wildlife-need?recruiter=728416211&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition

 

Bethany Lindsay · CBC News · Posted: Nov 17, 2018 8:00 AM PT | Last Updated: November 17

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/it-blows-my-mind-how-b-c-destroys-a-key-natural-wildfire-defence-every-year-1.4907358

 

Aspen trees naturally flourish after a wildfire, but they're also less vulnerable to flames than coniferous trees. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)

Last year, 12,812 hectares of B.C. forest was sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. It's an annual event — a mass extermination of broadleaf trees mandated by the province.

The eradication of trees like aspen and birch on regenerating forest stands is meant to make room for more commercially valuable conifer species like pine and Douglas fir.

 

But experts say it also removes one of the best natural defences we have against wildfire, at a time when our warming climate is helping make large, destructive fires more and more common.

Last Updated on Thursday, 22 November 2018 09:11
Read more...
 
Drought in northern and central B.C. has officials worried PDF Print E-mail
Earth News
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 17 October 2018 08:23

B.C. lands ministry is asking for voluntary reductions in water use so fracking can continue.

The Canadian Press · Posted: Oct 10, 2018 10:35 AM PT | Last Updated: October 10

 

alt

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 November 2018 23:00
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 55

Latest News