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Common Security: Through Implementing Precedents Underlying the SDGs E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 March 2018 18:55

OBLIGATIONS AND COMMITMENTS UNDERLYING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

In the following, the SDGs are placed in the context of years of international obligation derived from a selection of Conventions, treaties, and Covenants  and of commitments from UNGA  Conference Action Plans, Declarations and and Resolutions.

Last Updated on Sunday, 15 April 2018 19:54
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B.C. recruits noted constitutional lawyer for court action over Trans Mountain expansion E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 13 March 2018 06:45

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/trans-mountain-kinder-morgan-court-joseph-arvay-1.4573634

B.C. recruits noted constitutional lawyer for court action over Trans Mountain expansion

Joseph Arvay has made arguments in several headline-grabbing court cases

By Liam Britten, CBC News Posted: Mar 12, 2018 10:12 PM PT Last Updated: Mar 12, 2018 10:12 PM PT

Joseph Arvay will be developing a reference case on behalf of the B.C. government as to whether or not the province can restrict bitumen exports.

Joseph Arvay will be developing a reference case on behalf of the B.C. government as to whether or not the province can restrict bitumen exports. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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A high-profile constitutional lawyer will represent British Columbia in an upcoming court action over Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

The province announced Monday that Joseph Arvay has been appointed external counsel for B.C. in a reference case that could establish whether or not B.C. can restrict bitumen transported through the province.

A reference case is where the court is asked to weigh in on a particular legal matter, often when the constitution or division of powers between the federal and provincial governments is involved.

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Opponents of Kinder Morgan pipeline call out media's false equivalency in coverage of demonstrations E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 12 March 2018 20:58

by Charlie Smith  Georgia Strait

on March 12th, 2018 at 4:32 PM

 

  • This was the scene in Burnaby on Saturday (March 10).
 
  • This was the scene in Burnaby on Saturday (March 10). Mike Hudema

There's an unusual clarification at the bottom of a recent CBC News web story about two pipeline demonstrations in Metro Vancouver.

"A previous version of this story gave coverage to the pro-pipeline rally that was disproportionate based on the number of people who attended it," the tagline states. "The story has been updated to more accurately reflect both sides of the debate."

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Trump Administration Tries to Torpedo Venezuelan Elections as It Intensifies “Regime Change” Efforts E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 03 March 2018 23:07

See article on original site 

In recent weeks, the Trump administration has stepped up its efforts at “regime change” in Venezuela. In the past, Trump himself has even mentioned military action as a possible option, but the most recent moves appear more likely to be implemented, and some are already operational. According to sources with knowledge of the matter, the leading opposition contender for Venezuela’s upcoming presidential election, Henri Falcón, was told by US officials that the Trump administration would consider financial sanctions against him if he entered the presidential race. (The US State Department did not return requests for comment.) The US has backed the main opposition coalition decision to boycott the election.

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Lax Kw’alaams hereditary leaders voice support for oil tanker ban E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 28 February 2018 16:50

 

Lax Kw’alaams hereditary leaders voice support for oil tanker ban

 

 

A group of North Coast First Nation hereditary leaders says it is in full support of the federal government’s proposed oil tanker ban.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 28 February 2018 16:55
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First Nations say they've secured major work stoppage on Site C dam in advance of injunction application E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 27 February 2018 14:56
Charlie Smith - February 26th, 2018

West Moberly Chief Roland Willson says "B.C. Hydro wouldn’t send their contractors home and shut down work for the next six months unless their back was against the wall. - Roland Willson

Many assumed the $10.7-billion Site C dam was a done deal when Premier John Horgan announced in December that B.C. Hydro would complete the project.

That perception was reinforced less than when the Crown utilitychose its preferred proponent for the generation station and spillways civil-works contract.

Moreover, the International Union of Operating Engineers, which strongly supports the Site C dam, donated $123,520 to the NDP before the 2017 election.

It left little doubt in the minds of most media commentators that nothing could stop the project.

Last Updated on Thursday, 01 March 2018 17:11
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Oak Bay, B.C., moves ahead with experimental deer control program E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 24 February 2018 09:44

Vancouver Island community hopes to launch first deer birth control program in Canada

Emily Brass · CBC News - February 23, 2018

The Urban Wildlife Stewardship Society is overseeing the deer control project, which aims to capture 20 does before fawning season begins in late March. (CBC )

The community of Oak Bay, on southern Vancouver Island, is moving ahead with an experimental project to control urban deer using a contraceptive that has been used on the wild horse population in Alberta.

The district has partnered with the Urban Wildlife Stewardship Society, which is overseeing the project. It aims to capture 20 does before fawning season begins in late March.

The group is now sedating and putting collars on the animals, equipped with tracking devices. The team is also taking blood, fecal and DNA samples.

Last Updated on Saturday, 24 February 2018 10:19
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'Science is being ignored:' prominent Alberta professor sides with B.C. on pipeline E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Tuesday, 20 February 2018 15:10

David Schindler

David Schindler was awarded an Alberta Order of Excellence in 2008 for his work protecting fresh water resources in Canada and around the world and has advised the provincial government on oil spill clean-ups in the past. (University of Alberta)

Notley announced a provincial boycott on all imports of B.C. wines and cut off talks to purchase $500 million worth of electricity from B.C, escalating the inter-provincial spat over the pipeline.

He mentioned a Royal Society of Canada study from 2015 that lays out the unknowns when it comes to the transport of bitumen and said that many of the issues raised then have still not been addressed.

In particular, he said, he is concerned with oil spills during colder months.

"We still don't know how to get bitumen out from under the ice," he said. "If it goes in to one of the major salmon rivers crossing B.C., we will just sit by and helplessly watch it go downstream."

Climate change commitments 

It's not just scientific research and answers that are lacking, Schindler says, but also commitment to promises during the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference held in Paris.

"From what I see, we are not taking this commitment very seriously at all," he said. "We are taking a very 'head in the sand' approach to the problem."

  • NEB clears Trans Mountain to begin pipeline tunnel work at Burnaby Mountain

He says ventures to more renewable sources of energy, particularly geothermal, and away from the oil and gas industry are key to moving forward.

"If this were the beginning of the 20th century, we'd probably be protecting the buggy manufacturers and telling people 

Ecology professor argues the interprovincial dispute is being driven by politics, not science

By Clare Hennig, CBC NewsPosted: Feb 19, 2018 3:35 PM PT Last Updated: Feb 19, 2018 3:35 PM PT

Despite the tough stance from Alberta Premier Rachel Notley about Kinder Morgan Canada's pipeline expansion, a prominent Alberta academic is taking British Columbia's side in the dispute.

David Schindler, professor emeritus of ecology at the University of Alberta, says he thinks B.C.'s concerns about the Trans Mountain pipeline are legitimate.

The issue is one of science and not politics, he argues.

"Somehow, science is being ignored in all this," he told CBC. Early Edition Stephen Quinn. "I think the questions [about spills] are very legitimate."

The National Energy Board recently announced that construction of the TransMountain pipeline expansion can go forward on Burnaby Mountain, but the B.C. government says it will restrict any increase in bitumen shipments until further study is conducted on spills.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 21 February 2018 19:25
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'Morally Bankrupt' Budget: After $1.5 Trillion Gift to Rich, Trump Demands $1.7 Trillion in Safety Net Cuts E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Saturday, 17 February 2018 10:05

"Millions of Americans will lose access to life-saving programs because the GOP gave $1.5 trillion in tax cuts to the rich."  After $1.5 Trillion Gift to Rich, Trump Demands $1.7 Trillion in Safety Net Cuts

Staff members display recently released printed copies of U.S. President Donald Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget at the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill February 12, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Staff members display recently released printed copies of U.S. President Donald Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget at the House Budget Committee on Capitol Hill February 12, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Those wondering how President Donald Trump plans to pay for the $1.5 trillion in tax cuts for the rich he signed into law last year got their answer on Monday, when the White House unveiled its 2019 budget (pdf) blueprint that calls for $1.7 trillion in cuts to crucial safety net programs over the next decade—including $237 billion in cuts to Medicare alone.

"Millions of Americans will lose access to life-saving programs because the GOP gave $1.5 trillion in tax cuts to the rich." 

Last Updated on Sunday, 18 February 2018 13:16
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Lets Party During BC Wine and Cheese Week E-mail
Posted by Dragonslayer   
Monday, 12 February 2018 18:25

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley recently attacked the innocent bystander (BC Wine Industry)  because of an unrelated issue about the Kinder Morgan pipe line. 

She went even further by pulling out the Russian playbook and suggested that If BC didn't do what she wants that she would encourage BC residents to vote against the BC NDP in BC byelections.   Blackmail and election tampering for sure.   Maybe she broke the law?  Ya think?

I would like to invite all those thirsty Albertans to come visit us in BC.  Open up the summer cottage and throw wine and cheese parties.  Perhaps we could convince Premier Horgan to declare a wine and cheese holliday so we could all take a day to tie one on.   Oh what the heck...Lets just make it a week and we can super charge our wine industry.  We might even end up with a stimulated cheese industry.

Last Updated on Monday, 12 February 2018 18:50
 
Fort McKay First Nation Fights for ‘Last Refuge’ Amidst Oilsands Development E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 09 February 2018 09:35

 

Moose Lake

First elected to lead Fort McKay First Nation in northeast Alberta more than three decades ago, Boucher has made a name for his cooperative relationship with industry, which includes launching a sizable oilsands service conglomerate, denouncing environmentalists and purchasing a 34 per cent stake in a $1 billion Suncor bitumen storage terminal.

But now, a proposed 10,000 barrel per day oilsands project is threatening to infringe on a nearby sacred region called Moose Lake that serves as the First Nation’s “key cultural heartland” and is shared with the local Métis community for traditional activities. And Boucher is speaking out against the project — specifically targeting the provincial NDP for failing to finalize a management plan that would restrict development in the area prior to the regulatory hearings.

This government does not want to do an agreement with Fort McKay,” said Boucher in an interview with DeSmog Canada, during a break in the Alberta Energy Regulator hearings. “We’ve had discussions with them. As a result of these discussions, we have gone nowhere in terms of trying to resolve our issues with respect to the integrity of Moose Lake.”

A spokesperson for Alberta’s environment and parks department didn’t provide a response before deadline.

Last Updated on Friday, 09 February 2018 09:41
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